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Results 101 - 120 of 440.


Life Sciences - 04.10.2018
Super-resolution microscopy builds multicolor 3D from 2D
Super-resolution microscopy builds multicolor 3D from 2D
A new technique developed by EPFL overcomes the noise and color limitations of super-resolution microscopy by creating three-dimensional reconstructions from single-color, two-dimensional images of protein complexes. Image: Human centrioles labelled with antibodies against two proteins (Cep152, HsSAS-6) and imaged using super-resolution microscopy.

Environment - Astronomy / Space Science - 04.10.2018
Satellite pictures reveal the condition of lakes
Satellite pictures reveal the condition of lakes
When does the poisonous blue alga reach its critical point and how does the lake react to heat waves' In the future, satellite pictures will answer these questions in real time. This is demonstrated by an Eawag researcher's new dataset. Hardly any other ecosystem is more strongly affected by environmental changes than fresh-water lakes.

Health - Life Sciences - 03.10.2018
Roche announces new data for risdiplam in Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) at the World Muscle Society Congress
Roche announces new data for risdiplam in Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) at the World Muscle Society Congress Preliminary findings from Part 1 of the FIREFISH study show that infants with Type 1 SMA are meeting developmental milestones including sitting without support Preliminary data from Part 1 of the SUNFISH study show improvements in motor function in people with Type 2/3 SMA No drug-related safety findings leading to withdrawal in risdiplam

Life Sciences - 02.10.2018
Giraffe Babies Inherit Spot Patterns from their Mothers
Giraffe Babies Inherit Spot Patterns from their Mothers
Some features of a giraffe's spot pattern are passed on from mother to calf, a new study led by researchers from University of Zurich and Penn State reveals. The study also shows that the survival of young giraffes is linked to their spot patterns, which may help provide camouflage from predators. The study also highlights a new set of tools that can be used to study the markings of other wild animals.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 02.10.2018
New tool helps scientists better target the search for alien life
New tool helps scientists better target the search for alien life
An EPFL scientist has developed a novel approach that boosts the chances of finding extraterrestrial intelligence in our galaxy. His method uses probability theory to calculate the possibility of detecting an extraterrestrial signal (if there is one) at a given distance from Earth.

Health - Life Sciences - 02.10.2018
Human hair cells from a test tube
Human hair cells from a test tube
Researchers from the University of Bern and Bern University Hospital have managed for the first time to differentiate human inner ear cells in a laboratory from somatic progenitors and to investigate their origin. This will make it possible to develop new treatment methods for hearing impairment in the future.

Life Sciences - Environment - 02.10.2018
How the Elephant Cracked its Skin to Cool
How the Elephant Cracked its Skin to Cool
Researchers have observed that elephants regulate their body heat through their skin, which cracks into deep cracks, absorbing a maximum water. An intricate network of minuscule crevices adorns the skin surface of the African bush elephant. By retaining water and mud, these micrometer-wide channels greatly help elephants in regulating their body temperature and protecting their skin against parasites and intense solar radiation.

Health - Pharmacology - 02.10.2018
Roche to present five-year OCREVUS (ocrelizumab) efficacy and safety data in relapsing and primary progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) at ECTRIMS
Roche to present five-year OCREVUS (ocrelizumab) efficacy and safety data in relapsing and primary progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) at ECTRIMS Data reinforce importance of early initiation and continuation of OCREVUS treatment New analyses highlight the need for active treatment in underrepresented populations, such as primary progressive MS (PPMS) patients with more advanced disability and relapsing MS (RMS) patients of African descent Roche

Physics - 01.10.2018
Microresonators offer a simpler approach to sensing with light pulses
Microresonators offer a simpler approach to sensing with light pulses
Researchers at EPFL have found a way to implement an optical sensing system by using spatial multiplexing, a technique originally developed in optical-fiber communication. The method, which produces three independent streams of ultrashort optical pulses using a single continuous-wave laser and a single optical microresonator, is far simpler than existing technologies.

Physics - Chemistry - 01.10.2018
Eco-Friendly Nanoparticles for Artificial Photosynthesis
Quantum dots are true all-rounders. These material structures, which are only a few nanometers in size, display a similar behavior to that of molecules or atoms, and their form, size and number of electrons can be modulated systematically. This means that their electrical and optical characteristics can be customized for a number of target areas, such as new display technologies, biomedical applications as well as photovoltaics and photocatalysis.

Physics - 01.10.2018
Rugby or football? ISOLDE reveals shape-shifting character of Mercury isotopes
Rugby or football? ISOLDE reveals shape-shifting character of Mercury isotopes
Geneva 1 st October 2018. An unprecedented combination of experimental nuclear physics and theoretical and computational modelling techniques has been brought together to reveal the full extent of the odd-even shape staggering of exotic mercury isotopes, and explain how it happens. The result, from an international team at the ISOLDE nuclear physics facility at CERN 1 , published today , demonstrates and explains a phenomenon unique to mercury isotopes where the shape of the atomic nuclei dramatically moves between a football and rugby ball.

Health - 28.09.2018
Targeted Vaccination to Interrupt Rabies Transmission
Targeted Vaccination to Interrupt Rabies Transmission
Although the disease is preventable, rabies continues to kill more than 60'000 people per year - mainly children in Asia and Africa. New research by Swiss TPH may pave the way to more targeted dog vaccination in order to eliminate rabies by 2030. The rabies virus is primarily (99%) transmitted to humans through dog bites.

Health - Psychology - 28.09.2018
New software helps analyze writing disabilities
Nearly 10% of elementary school students have trouble learning to write, with potentially lasting consequences on their education. EPFL researchers have developed a software program that can analyze these children's writing disabilities and their causes with unparalleled precision. Trouble learning how to write, called dysgraphia, affects some 10% of schoolchildren.

Environment - Innovation - 27.09.2018
Centralised or decentralised - that is the question
Centralised or decentralised - that is the question
Dealing with wastewater right where it is being produced, instead of in central treatment plants, can be more flexible and economical depending on the location. In Switzerland, however, there are very few such decentralised wastewater treatment plants - although, as Eawag researchers have established, there is a surprisingly strong market potential for them.

Life Sciences - 25.09.2018
Diversity in the brain - How millions of neurons become unique
Diversity in the brain - How millions of neurons become unique
How is it possible that so many different and highly specific neurons arise in the brain? A mathematic model developed by researchers from the University of Basel's Biozentrum demonstrates that different variants of genes enable such a random diversity. The scientists describe in "Cell Reports" that despite countless numbers of newly formed neurons, the genetic variants equip neurons individually and precisely for their specific function.

Life Sciences - Environment - 25.09.2018
Genome Duplication Drives Evolution of Species
Genome Duplication Drives Evolution of Species
Many wild and cultivated plants arise through the combination of two different species. The genome of these so-called polyploid species often consists of a quadruple set of chromosomes - a double set for each parental species - and thus has about twice as many genes as the original species. About 50 years ago, evolutionary biologists postulated that this process drives evolution, leading to new species.

Life Sciences - 25.09.2018
The Soothing Effects of Strangers
The Soothing Effects of Strangers
Pain-relieving actions by other people trigger a learning effect in the brain which reduces pain. A new study led by the University of Zurich shows that pain relief is more effective when it is provided by a stranger. Pain and the psyche are closely linked, and social factors play a crucial role in determining how people experience pain.

Materials Science - Innovation - 24.09.2018
EPFL unveils SolAce, a solar-powered pilot unit in Dübendorf
EPFL's SolAce pilot unit was inaugurated today at the NEST R&D center on the Empa campus in Dübendorf, Switzerland. Researchers at this solar-powered unit will test out new technology designed to make buildings energy positive and carbon neutral - while providing maximum comfort for their occupants.

Innovation - Environment - 24.09.2018
A facade that is a power plant and a guarantee of wellbeing
A facade that is a power plant and a guarantee of wellbeing
Anyone who spends most of their day indoors knows the importance of a comfortable atmosphere to work and live in. Researchers from EPFL's Solar Energy and Building Physics Laboratory are searching for ways to maximize the energy gain from a building's envelope while also optimizing interior comfort in an environmentally friendly way.

Astronomy / Space Science - 21.09.2018
Space research: What happens to soils in weightlessness?
Space research: What happens to soils in weightlessness?
In the future, astronauts on long missions in space will have to take care of their own farming. But will that even work? An unusual experiment by Eawag researcher was designed to find some of the answers. Life on our planet has always been under the influence of gravity. But how would soils, plants and other organisms react in a zero-gravity situation? Scientists have been puzzling over this question since last decades until now, and Eawag hydrologist and soil physicist, Joaquin Jimenez-Martinez and his colleagues are also keen to understand how zero gravity affects soil processes.