news 2018


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Results 341 - 360 of 440.


Health - History / Archeology - 04.04.2018
Inner Ear Provides Clues to Human Dispersal
Inner Ear Provides Clues to Human Dispersal
The early migration of humans out of Africa and across the world can be proven using genetic and morphological analyses. However, morphological data from the skull and skeleton often only allow limited conclusions to be drawn about the geographical dispersal pattern, especially because of the many ways in which the human skeleton adapts to local environmental conditions.

Health - 03.04.2018
Attacking Flu Viruses from Two Sides
Attacking Flu Viruses from Two Sides
Fever, shivering, headaches, and joint pains - each year millions of people around the world are affected by the flu. While most people recover after a few days, the WHO estimates that each year between 250,000 and 500,000 people die from the disease. As there are only few effective treatment options, medical efforts have thus far focused on vaccination to combat the flu.

Physics - 03.04.2018
Using water molecules to read electrical activity in lipid membranes
Using water molecules to read electrical activity in lipid membranes
EPFL researchers were able to map out in real time how charges are transported across and along membranes simply by observing the behavior of adjacent water molecules. Their non-invasive and label-free method represents a valuable new tool in the effort to understand how cells - and neurons in particular - function.

Health - Pharmacology - 29.03.2018
Smartphone Applications to Improve Child Health
Smartphone Applications to Improve Child Health
New technologies are progressively transforming health care. Swiss TPH developed two generations of digital point of care systems that support clinical personnel in the diagnosis and care of sick children. Swiss TPH will actively participate at this year's Geneva Health Forum on "Precision Global Health in the Digital Age" from 10-12 April 2018.

Life Sciences - Administration - 29.03.2018
Gene rhythm: how the circadian clock regulates 3D chromatin structure
Gene rhythm: how the circadian clock regulates 3D chromatin structure
EPFL biologists and geneticists have uncovered how the circadian clock orchestrates the 24-hour cycle of gene expression by regulating the structure of chromatin, the tightly wound DNA-protein complex of the cell. The work is published in Genes & Development. The circadian clock is an internal, biological "metronome" that dictates our 24-hour activity pattern.

Health - Life Sciences - 27.03.2018
The ugly ducklings: biofilms in bath toys
Rubber ducks and crocodiles have always been popular bathtime companions. An Eawag study has now revealed the "dark side" of flexible plastic bath toys. Diverse microbial growth is promoted not only by the plastic materials but by bath users themselves. Warm, humid bathrooms provide ideal conditions for the formation of bacterial and fungal biofilms - for example, on shower curtains or behind cabinets.

Physics - Chemistry - 26.03.2018
New Method Speeds Up Development of Medication
New Method Speeds Up Development of Medication
One of the key steps in developing new drugs is determining the atomic structure of its biologically active substances. This generally involves performing X-ray analyses of single crystal structures to determine the ingredient's detailed three-dimensional set-up. However, growing suitable single crystals is often a complex and time-consuming process.

Innovation - 26.03.2018
A smart car that can read brain signals
A smart car that can read brain signals
EPFL and Nissan researchers are able to read a driver's brain signals and send them to a smart vehicle so that it can anticipate the driver's moves and facilitate the driving process.

Health - Music - 26.03.2018
Healing instead of cutting down
Healing instead of cutting down
Trees can also get sick. In urban areas, this usually means that the infested tree has to be felled for safety reasons.

Health - 23.03.2018
Breakthrough article on mechanistic features of microRNA targeting and activity
Giovanna Brancati and Helge Grosshans from the FMI have described target specialization of miRNAs of the let-7 family. They identified target site features that determine specificity, and revealed that specificity can be modulated in a manner that allows cells to integrate target site quality and miRNA abundance.

Health - Pharmacology - 22.03.2018
Attacking lymphoma at the source
Attacking lymphoma at the source
The efficacy of target specific therapies in lymphoma is limited to subgroups of patients. EPFL scientists have identified a mechanism that confers resistance against a common therapy for lymphoma.

Microtechnics - Computer Science - 22.03.2018
Robots working together to build a NEST
Robots working together to build a NEST
Researchers from ETH Zurich are using a new method for digital timber construction in a real-world project for the first time.

Microtechnics - Computer Science - 22.03.2018
Robots work together to build NEST unit
Robots work together to build NEST unit
Researchers from ETH Zurich are using a new method for digital timber construction in a real-world project for the first time. The load-bearing timber modules, which are prefabricated by robots, will be assembled in the "DFAB HOUSE" unit at Empa and Eawag's NEST research and innovation building, thus combining architecture with robotics and craftsmanship.

Environment - Chemistry - 20.03.2018
The world's first formic acid-based fuel cell
The world's first formic acid-based fuel cell
Scientists at EPFL and GRT Group have built the world's first integrated power supply unit that can produce electricity from formic acid, using a fuel cell in an energy-efficient, safe, cost-effective, and sustainable way.

Health - Pharmacology - 19.03.2018
LSD Blurs Boundaries between the experience of Self and Other
LSD Blurs Boundaries between the experience of Self and Other
Virtually all mental health disorders come with difficulties in interpersonal relations that in the long run negatively affect the progression of the disease. The associated health an social restrictions can only be marginally improved by current forms of therapy. One of the reasons for this is that there has been very little research into the basic neurobiological principles and in particular the neurochemical mechanisms of these kinds of disorders.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.03.2018
Wyss Center microscope reveals brain circuit reorganisation that could help solve paralysis
Wyss Center microscope reveals brain circuit reorganisation that could help solve paralysis
High resolution imaging has revealed neuronal reorganisation that enables rats to walk again after therapy. The detailed 3D images were captured using the Wyss Center's custom-built lightsheet microscope. Publication of the paper coincides with the two-day Wyss Center lightsheet microscopy workshop held at Campus Biotech in Geneva.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.03.2018
Tiny implants for cells are functional in vivo
Tiny implants for cells are functional in vivo
For the first time, an interdisciplinary team from the University of Basel has succeeded in integrating artificial organelles into the cells of living zebrafish embryos. This innovative approach using artificial organelles as cellular implants offers new potential in treating a range of diseases, as the authors report in an article published.

Life Sciences - Health - 16.03.2018
Mice Change Their Appearance as a Result of Frequent Exposure to Humans
Mice Change Their Appearance as a Result of Frequent Exposure to Humans
Dogs, cows, sheep, horses, pigs, and birds - over the past 15,000 years, our ancestors domesticated dozens of wild animals to keep them as farm animals or pets. To make wild wolves evolve into tame dogs, the least aggressive animals, or most gentle ones, were selected for breeding. Tameness was therefore the key criterion for selection.

Astronomy / Space Science - 16.03.2018
A massive telescope for seeing the invisible
Some of the universe's greatest mysteries could soon be resolved thanks to the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), a huge radio telescope that will be built in South Africa and Australia. Several EPFL labs are involved in this epic project. With the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) telescope, scientists hope to be able to view matter and forces that have been invisible until now.

Health - Pharmacology - 15.03.2018
New Understanding of Parasite Biology Might Help Stop Malaria Transmission
New Understanding of Parasite Biology Might Help Stop Malaria Transmission
Researchers at Swiss TPH made an important step toward deeper understanding of how malaria blood stage parasites turn the switch to become transmissible to other humans. This knowledge is fundamental for future research aiming to interrupt malaria transmission. The results will be published on Friday 16 March 2018 in the multidisciplinary journal Science.