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Results 161 - 180 of 186.


Health - Life Sciences - 25.02.2019
Neanderthals Walked Upright just like the Humans of Today
Neanderthals Walked Upright just like the Humans of Today
Neanderthals are often depicted as having straight spines and poor posture. However, these prehistoric humans were more similar to us than many assume. University of Zurich researchers have shown that Neanderthals walked upright just like modern humans ' thanks to a virtual reconstruction of the pelvis and spine of a very well-preserved Neanderthal skeleton found in France.

Health - Life Sciences - 25.02.2019
Bacteria walk (a bit) like we do
Bacteria walk (a bit) like we do
EPFL biophysicists have been able to directly study the way bacteria move on surfaces, revealing a molecular machinery reminiscent of motor reflexes. Do bacteria control their "walks" like we do? It might sound strange, but it's a fundamental question. Understanding bacteria motility would not only expand our understanding of their behavior, but would also help us fight certain aggressive pathogens.

Health - Life Sciences - 21.02.2019
Bat Influenza Viruses Could Infect Humans
Bat Influenza Viruses Could Infect Humans
Bats don't only carry the deadly Ebola virus, but are also a reservoir for a new type of influenza virus. These newly discovered flu viruses could potentially also attack the cells of humans and livestock, researchers at the University of Zurich have now shown. Seasonal outbreaks of the flu are caused by influenza viruses that can only infect people.

Life Sciences - 20.02.2019
A prosthetic that restores the sense of where your hand is
A prosthetic that restores the sense of where your hand is
Researchers have developed a next-generation bionic hand that allows amputees to regain their proprioception. The results of the study, which have been published in Science Robotics, are the culmination of ten years of robotics research. The next-generation bionic hand, developed by researchers from EPFL, the Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies in Pisa and the A. Gemelli University Polyclinic in Rome, enables amputees to regain a very subtle, close-to-natural sense of touch.

Environment - Life Sciences - 20.02.2019
Floating research station to illuminate Lake Geneva
Floating research station to illuminate Lake Geneva
Our lakes are unique resources for us and for nature, providing water for drinking and irrigation, habitats for fish, plants and small animals, and space for relaxation and fun. But these sensitive ecosystems are under pressure. In addition to the problems associated with changing land use and inputs of nutrients and pollutants, climate change is also affecting the lakes in our Alpine regions.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.02.2019
Diabetes: human cells can also change jobs
Diabetes: human cells can also change jobs
UNIGE researchers demonstrate the ease of some human pancreatic cells to make insulin. In diabetes, this type of cell conversion could compensate for the loss or dysfunction of cells that naturally produce this hormone. A world first. Biology textbooks teach us that adult cell types remain fixed in the identity they have acquired upon differentiation.

Environment - Life Sciences - 13.02.2019
Fate of Meerkats Tied to Seasonal Climate Effects
Fate of Meerkats Tied to Seasonal Climate Effects
Does a drier and hotter climate present a threat to the meerkats in the Kalahari Desert? Researchers from UZH and Cambridge show that climate change is likely to impact meerkats, and seasonal rainfall and temperature will be the key factors. The effects of climate change are especially obvious in arid environments where resources are scarce and subject to seasonal availability.

Life Sciences - Physics - 12.02.2019
The physical forces of cells in action
The physical forces of cells in action
Swiss scientists have developed probes designed to reveal the physical forces inside living cells. A world first. The detection of physical forces is one of the most complex challenges facing science. Although Newton's apple has long solved the problem of gravity, imaging the physical forces that act in living cells remains one of the main mysteries of current biology.

Environment - Life Sciences - 11.02.2019
The search for Selenium: Traces in the high Alps
The search for Selenium: Traces in the high Alps
Up to a billion people around the world are deficient in selenium and do not get sufficient amounts in their diets. This is detrimental to health, as selenium plays an important role in the immune system and is involved in the formation of countless proteins in the body. Animal products and, most of all, grains contain a lot of selenium.

Life Sciences - 06.02.2019
Morals versus Money: How We Make Social Decisions
Our actions are guided by moral values. However, monetary incentives can get in the way of our good intentions. Neuroeconomists at the University of Zurich have now investigated in which area of the brain conflicts between moral and material motives are resolved. Their findings reveal that our actions are more social when these deliberations are inhibited.

Life Sciences - 05.02.2019
Fine-tuning gene regulation by CG dinucleotides
Fine-tuning gene regulation by CG dinucleotides
Transcription of our genes mostly begins in regions of the genome called CpG islands. These are rich in the dinucleotide CpG (thus the name), critical for gene activity and devoid of DNA methylation. Despite the relevance of CpG islands, it is unclear if the CpG dinucleotide itself contributes to their activity.

Life Sciences - 31.01.2019
Learning new vocabulary during deep sleep
Learning new vocabulary during deep sleep
Researchers of the University of Bern, Switzerland, showed that we can acquire the vocabulary of a new language during distinct phases of slow-wave sleep and that the sleep-learned vocabulary could be retrieved unconsciously following waking. Memory formation appeared to be mediated by the same brain structures that also mediate wake vocabulary learning.

Life Sciences - Environment - 30.01.2019
A small fish provides insight into the genetic basis of evolution
A small fish provides insight into the genetic basis of evolution
A genetic analysis of sticklebacks shows that isolated populations in similar environments develop in comparable ways. The basis for this is already present in the genome of their genetic ancestors. Evolutionary biologists from the University of Basel and the University of Nottingham report these insights in the journal Evolution Letters.

Health - Life Sciences - 29.01.2019
Wheat Resistance Gene also Protects Corn and Barley against Fungal Disease
Wheat Resistance Gene also Protects Corn and Barley against Fungal Disease
Plant researchers at the University of Zurich have developed transgenic corn and barley lines with improved resistance against several fungal diseases thanks to the wheat resistance gene Lr34. Following successful tests in the greenhouse, the researchers are now planning to carry out field trials at the Agroscope site in Zurich-Reckenholz.

Health - Life Sciences - 28.01.2019
Cancer: A mutation that breaks gene interplay in 3D
Cancer: A mutation that breaks gene interplay in 3D
EPFL scientists have discovered how a mutated gene can affect the three-dimensional interactions of genes in the cell, leading to various forms of cancer. Inside the cell, DNA is tightly wrapped around proteins and packed in a complex, 3D structure that we call "chromatin". Chromatin not only protects our genetic material from damage, but also organizes the entire genome by regulating the expression of genes in three dimensions, unwinding them to be presented to the cell's gene-expression machinery and then winding them back in.

Life Sciences - Health - 28.01.2019
A solid scaffolding for our cells
A solid scaffolding for our cells
UNIGE researchers have discovered the fundamental role of the Not1 protein, which allows proteins to find each other and assemble at a precise pace, in the right place and at the right time. To perform properly the task for which they have been synthesized, proteins must first assemble to form effective cellular "machines".

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 28.01.2019
How do mRNAs deal with stress?
How do mRNAs deal with stress?
Two hallmarks of the integrated stress response of cells are the inhibition of translation and the formation of stress granules (SGs) and processing bodies (PBs). However, it is not well understood how both processes are coupled. In a study published in Molecular Cell, researchers from the Chao group applied single-molecule RNA imaging to study the interactions of mRNAs with SGs and PBs, and found out that the generally accepted assumptions about the function of granules need to be revised.

Health - Life Sciences - 21.01.2019
Discovery of bacterial signature of intestinal disease
Discovery of bacterial signature of intestinal disease
Researchers from the Department of Biomedical Research of the University of Bern and the University Clinic of Visceral Surgery and Medicine of the Inselspital Bern, Switzerland, have discovered that changes in the composition of the intestinal bacteria in patients with chronic inflammatory bowel disease affect the severity of the disease and the success of therapy.

Life Sciences - Computer Science - 16.01.2019
A robot recreates the walk of a 300-million-year-old animal
A robot recreates the walk of a 300-million-year-old animal
Using the fossil and fossilized footprints of a 300-million-year-old animal, an interdisciplinary team that includes scientists from EPFL and Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin have developed a method for identifying the most likely gaits of extinct animals and designed a robot that can recreate their walk.

Health - Life Sciences - 15.01.2019
Engineered'T cells promote long-term organ transplant acceptance
Engineered’T cells promote long-term organ transplant acceptance
Organ transplant rejection is a major problem in transplantation medicine. Suppressing the immune system to prevent organ rejection, however, opens the door to life-threatening infections. Researchers at the University of Basel's Biozentrum have now discovered a molecular approach preventing rejection of the transplanted graft while simultaneously maintaining the ability to fight against infections.