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Life Sciences - Health - 20.02.2020
New insights into the processes that cause Parkinson's disease
New insights into the processes that cause Parkinson's disease
In a breakthrough for Parkinson's disease, scientists at EPFL have reconstructing the process by which Lewy bodies form in the brain of patients. The study offers new insights into how Parkinson's disease begins and evolves, and opens up a set of potential new treatment targets. The brains of patients with Parkinson's disease contain distinct, characteristic structures called 'Lewy bodies', after Friedrich Heinrich Lewy who first reported their discovery in 1912.

Environment - Materials Science - 20.02.2020
Intensified research in concrete and asphalt
Intensified research in concrete and asphalt
As of March 2020, the new "Concrete and Asphalt" lab will strengthen Empa's research in the field of building materials. Innovative technologies and materials for sustainable production and use are particularly in demand in these areas, as these two building materials, with an annual volume of more than 4.5 billion tonnes, account for the largest proportion of all materials used worldwide by far.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.02.2020
From obesity to liver cancer: can we prevent the worst?
From obesity to liver cancer: can we prevent the worst?
By identifying the role of a specific protein in the development of obesity-related liver diseases, UNIGE researchers pave the way for better diagnosis, and potentially better treatment. Hepatocellular carcinoma, a very common liver cancer linked to the presence of fat in the liver, is one of the leading causes of cancer death worldwide.

Life Sciences - Computer Science - 19.02.2020
Using performance modelling for brain tissue simulations
Using performance modelling for brain tissue simulations
Scientists from EPFL (Switzerland) have extended performance modelling techniques to the field of computational brain science. In a paper published in Neuroinformatics, they provide a quantitative appraisal of the performance landscape of brain tissue simulations, and analyze in detail the relationship between an in silico experiment, the underlying neuron and connectivity model, the simulation algorithm and the hardware platform being used.

Physics - Electroengineering - 19.02.2020
Time-resolved measurement in a memory device
Time-resolved measurement in a memory device
Researchers at ETH have measured the timing of single writing events in a novel magnetic memory device with a resolution of less than 100 picoseconds. Their results are relevant for the next generation of main memories based on magnetism. At the Department for Materials of the ETH in Zurich, Pietro Gambardella and his collaborators investigate tomorrow's memory devices.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.02.2020
Fruit flies have a radical strategy for dealing with free radicals
Flies belonging to the genus Drosophila combat oxidative stress by removing excess fat from their blood. This remarkable mechanism proves that evolution has no shortage of answers to a problem that affects all life on Earth. Oxidative stress affects all living organisms, and the damage it causes is believed to play a part in cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer's disease and a number of other health conditions.

Physics - Materials Science - 18.02.2020
Creating custom light using 2D materials
Creating custom light using 2D materials
Researchers from the University of Geneva and the University of Manchester have discovered structures based on two-dimensional materials that emit tailor-made light in any colour you could wish for. Finding new semi-conductor materials that emit light is essential for developing a wide range of electronic devices.

Environment - 18.02.2020
Climate change will disrupt existing energy systems
As climate changes and extreme weather events become more commonplace, we will need to fundamentally rethink how we produce renewable energy. Researchers at EPFL have developed a simulation method to reduce the adverse influences due to climate-related uncertainties in the energy sector and guarantee robust operation of energy infrastructure during extreme climate events.

Materials Science - Life Sciences - 18.02.2020
How to mend a broken heart
How to mend a broken heart
If the heart muscle is damaged, repairing the constantly active organ is a challenge. Empa researchers are developing a novel tissue adhesive inspired by nature, which is able to repair lesions in muscle tissue. They have taken advantage of the incredible ability of marine mussels to adhere to any kind of surface.

Materials Science - Pedagogy - 14.02.2020
Our memory prefers essence over form
Our memory prefers essence over form
Researchers from the University of Geneva and CY Cergy Paris University have shown that current situations conjure up past situations that share deep, structural, similarities. What clues does our memory use to connect a current situation to a situation from the past? The results of a study conducted by researchers from the University of Geneva , Switzerland, - working in collaboration with CY Cergy Paris University in France - contrast sharply with the explanations found until now in the existing literature.

Materials Science - Physics - 13.02.2020
A fast light detector made of two-dimensional materials
A fast light detector made of two-dimensional materials
Two research groups at ETH Zurich have joined forces to develop a novel light detector. It consists of two-dimensional layers of different materials that are coupled to a silicon optical waveguide. In the future, this approach can also be used to make LEDs and optical modulators. Fast and highly efficient modulators as well as detectors for light are the core components of data transmission through fibre optic cables.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.02.2020
Printing tiny, high-precision objects in a matter of seconds
Researchers at EPFL have developed a new, high-precision method for 3D-printing small, soft objects. The process, which takes less than 30 seconds from start to finish, has potential applications in a wide range of fields, including 3D bioprinting. It all starts with a translucent liquid. Then, as if by magic, darker spots begin to form in the small, spinning container until, barely half a minute later, the finished product takes shape.

Life Sciences - 12.02.2020
Extinct Giant Turtle Had Horned Shell of up to Three Meters
Extinct Giant Turtle Had Horned Shell of up to Three Meters
Paleobiologists from the University of Zurich have discovered exceptional specimens in Venezuela and Colombia of an extinct giant freshwater turtle called Stupendemys. The carapace of this turtle, which is the largest ever known, measured between 2.4 to almost 3 meters. Moreover, the shell of male Stupendemys had horns ' a rare feature in turtles.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.02.2020
Algorithms for identifying new
Algorithms for identifying new "cancer genes"
It is estimated that the number of cancer cases worldwide will double by 2040. This makes the search for genes that cause cancer even more important. A team of researchers from the University of Bern and Inselspital, University Hospital Bern, has now developed algorithms that massively simplify the hunt for "cancer genes" in a poorly understood part of our genome.

Physics - Materials Science - 12.02.2020
New quasiparticle unveiled in room temperature semiconductors
New quasiparticle unveiled in room temperature semiconductors
Physicists from Switzerland and Germany have unveiled fingerprints of the long-sought particle known as Mahan exciton in the room temperature optical response of the popular methylammonium lead halide perovskites. The optical properties of semiconductors are governed by the so-called 'excitons', which are bound pairs of negative electrons and positive holes.

Health - Physics - 11.02.2020
Bacteria under the microscope: a new growth model for tuberculosis
Bacteria under the microscope: a new growth model for tuberculosis
New research has shed light on how mycobacteria grow. This discovery could explain why some members of this family of single-celled organisms, which includes the bacillus that causes tuberculosis, can develop resistance to antibiotics For centuries, scientists have peered down the lens of a microscope and watched as bacteria - some circular, others rod-shaped - multiply before their eyes.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.02.2020
Connecting two important processes in gene expression
Connecting two important processes in gene expression
RNA decay plays a fundamental role in gene expression by controlling the quality and quantity of messenger RNAs. However, it has proved difficult to study and is still shrouded in mystery. Scientists from the Bühler group now uncovered key targets, components and functions of mammalian RNA decay pathways, and found that RNA decay is tightly connected to another crucial stage of gene expression: protein synthesis (translation).

Life Sciences - 10.02.2020
Observe how microorganisms interact
Observe how microorganisms interact
Microbial communities are known to be indispensable for our planet. But surprisingly little is known about how they function. Researchers at the Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology and ETH Zurich are now shedding a little light on this subject. Without them there would be on oxygen, humans and animals could not digest, and the material cycles on Earth would come to a halt: Microorganisms.

Pharmacology - Health - 10.02.2020
Personalized cancer vaccines
Personalized cancer vaccines
The only therapeutic cancer vaccine available on the market has so far showed very limited efficacy in clinical trials. EPFL researchers are currently working on an alternative. They have developed a platform that allows a cancer vaccine to be delivered to a precise location and stimulate the immune system in a safe way - thereby overcoming one of the two obstacles to creating an effective vaccine.

Life Sciences - Environment - 10.02.2020
New world map of fish genetic diversity
New world map of fish genetic diversity
An international research team has studied genetic diversity among fish around the world for the first time. Their research produced a map that will serve as a tool in improving the protection of species and genetic diversity in the future. In a population of animals or plants, genetic diversity can decline much more quickly than species diversity in response to various stress factors: disease, changes to habitat or climate, and so on.
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