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Results 21 - 40 of 146.


Life Sciences - Environment - 26.08.2020
Explosive diversification explained by network analysis
Explosive diversification explained by network analysis
Using genomic analyses of 100 cichlid species, scientists from Eawag and the University Bern, together with co-workers in Australia, the UK, Tanzania, Uganda and the US, have investigated the striking variation observed in cichlid fish speciation rates. Their findings show that exchanges of genetic variants between existing species dramatically accelerate the development of new species - given favourable ecological conditions.

Life Sciences - Health - 26.08.2020
How Plants Close their Gates when Microbes Attack
Like humans, plants protect themselves against pathogens. An international consortium under the lead of UZH professor Cyril Zipfel has now identified a long sought-after factor of this plant immune system: The calcium channel triggers the closure of stomata upon contact with microbes such as bacteria.

Health - Life Sciences - 25.08.2020
Discovery of new genes that influence the success of cancer treatment
Discovery of new genes that influence the success of cancer treatment
One of the great mysteries of cancer research is why certain patients respond better to radiation therapy than others. Researchers at the University of Bern have now discovered which genes play an important role in this. This results in new findings for cancer treatment. Radiotherapy is a cornerstone of today's cancer treatment.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 18.08.2020
RNA as a future cure for hereditary diseases
RNA as a future cure for hereditary diseases
ETH Zurich scientists have developed an RNA molecule that can be used in bone marrow cells to correct genetic errors that affect protein production. Patients suffering from a rare hereditary disease that causes a painful hypersensitivity to sunlight could benefit in future. Short RNA molecules can be used as medication.

Life Sciences - 17.08.2020
Protective factor against psychological trauma
The endogenous regulation of a specific gene is associated with a reduced risk of developing post-traumatic stress disorder following a terrifying experience. In particular, traumatic memories of the experience are less severe. Researchers from the University of Basel have reported these findings in the scientific journal PNAS.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.08.2020
How a protein stops cells from attacking their own DNA
How a protein stops cells from attacking their own DNA
Scientists at EPFL have demonstrated the mechanism that allows cells to fight off viral DNA without triggering an immune response against their own genetic material. Viruses multiply by injecting their DNA into a host cell. Once it enters the intracellular fluid, this foreign material triggers a defense mechanism known as the cGAS-STING pathway.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.08.2020
The (neuro)science of getting and staying motivated
Neuroscientists at EPFL and the University of Edinburgh have discovered that the degree of motivation and the stamina to keep it up depends on the ratio between the neurotransmitters glutamine and glutamate in the nucleus accumbens of the brain. There is no question that motivation is one of the hardest and yet important factors in life.

Innovation - Life Sciences - 12.08.2020
New device delivers single cells in just one click
EPFL spin-off SEED Biosciences has developed a pipetting robot that can dispense individual cells one by one. Their innovation allows for enhanced reliability and traceability, and can save life-science researchers time and money. The engineers at SEED Biosciences, an EPFL spin-off, have come up with a unique pipetting robot that can isolate single cells with the push of a button - without damaging the cells.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.08.2020
Neurotechnology holds promise for chronic stroke patients
Personalized neurotech could boost rehab success Personalized neurotechnology-aided rehabilitation of the arm could improve recovery in severe chronic stroke patients according to a new paper published today in the journal Brain .

Life Sciences - Computer Science - 11.08.2020
New microscopes to unravel the mysteries of brain organization
New microscopes to unravel the mysteries of brain organization
Researchers around the world share their stunning images and insights: The open source mesoSPIM Initiative The secret of capturing exquisite brain images with a new generation of custom-built microscopes is revealed today . The new microscopes, known as mesoSPIMs, can image the minute detail of brain tissue down to individual neurons that are five times thinner than a human hair, and can uncover the 3D anatomy of entire small organs, faster than ever before.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.08.2020
Fireflies shed light on the function of mitochondria
The mitochondria provide energy for our cells, yet their role in many diseases is still poorly understood. Thanks to a bioluminescent molecule, scientists at EPFL can observe them at work in living mammals Tiny factories float inside our cells and provide them with almost all the energy they need: the mitochondria.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 06.08.2020
Long Neck Helped Reptile Hunt Underwater
Long Neck Helped Reptile Hunt Underwater
Its neck was three times as long as its torso, but had only thirteen extremely elongated vertebrae: "Tanystropheus", a bizarre giraffe-necked reptile which lived 242 million years ago, is a paleontological absurdity. A new study led by the University of Zurich has now shown that the creature lived in water and was surprisingly adaptable.

Life Sciences - Health - 06.08.2020
REM sleep tunes eating behaviour
REM sleep tunes eating behaviour
Despite our broad understanding of the different brain regions activated during rapid-eye-movement sleep, little is known about what this activity serves for. Researchers at the University of Bern and the Inselspital have now discovered that the activation of neurons in the hypothalamus during REM sleep regulates eating behaviour: suppressing this activity in mice decreases appetite.

Life Sciences - 05.08.2020
Autism: How a gene alteration modifies social behavior
Autism: How a gene alteration modifies social behavior
A team of researchers at the Biozentrum, University of Basel, has discovered a new connection between a genetic alteration and social difficulties related to autism: A mutation in the neuroligin-3 gene reduces the effect of the hormone oxytocin. In the journal -Nature-, the researchers report on a treatment approach that could normalize social behavior in autism.

Life Sciences - Health - 05.08.2020
Discovery shows promise for treating Huntington's Disease
Scientists at EPFL's Brain Mind Institute have identified an enzyme that can play a central role in developing a new route of treatment for Huntington's Disease. Huntington disease is a progressive and aggressively debilitating brain disorder that causes uncontrolled movements, psychological problems, and loss of cognition.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 04.08.2020
Blood-thinner with no bleeding side-effects is here
Blood-thinner with no bleeding side-effects is here
In a study led by EPFL, scientists have developed a synthetic blood-thinner that, unlike all others, doesn't cause bleeding side-effects. The highly potent, highly selective, and highly stable molecule can suppress thrombosis while letting blood clot normally following injury. Patients who suffer from thrombosis, pulmonary embolism or stroke are usually put on drugs that help their blood flow more smoothly through their body.

Life Sciences - Materials Science - 04.08.2020
Cells relax their membrane to control protein sorting
Cells relax their membrane to control protein sorting
Researchers have succeeded in measuring the tension of the membrane of an organelle forming inside a cell. The tension in the outer membrane of cells plays an important role in a number of biological processes. A localised drop in tension, for example, makes it easier for the surface to be bending inward and form invaginations that will become free vesicles inside the cell.

Health - Life Sciences - 30.07.2020
Rapid test for the determination of antibodies against SARS-CoV-2
Rapid test for the determination of antibodies against SARS-CoV-2
A Swiss-German team presents a test that determines the amount of neutralising antibodies within a short period of time. The test was developed at the Institute of Virology and Immunology (IVI) of the University of Bern and the Swiss Federal Office for Food Safety and Animal Health, and evaluated in cooperation with colleagues from the Ruhr-University Bochum using serum samples from COVID-19 patients.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 27.07.2020
The amazing travels of small RNAs
Biologists have known for some time that RNA interference can silence genes in far-off cells. They suspected that a messenger substance "transmits" RNA interference. Now, ETH researchers have definitively shown that these messengers in plants are short double-stranded RNA fragments. In most organisms, small bits of RNA play a key role in gene regulation by silencing gene expression.

Life Sciences - 24.07.2020
Big Brains and Dexterous Hands
Big Brains and Dexterous Hands
Primates with large brains can master more complex hand movements than those with smaller brains. However, fine motor skills such as using tools can take time to learn, and humans take the longest of all. Large-brained species such as humans and great apes do not actually learn more slowly than other primates but instead start later, researchers at the University of Zurich have shown.