news 2021

Health - Apr 13
Scientists have developed algorithms that, combined with wearable sensors, could help clinicians to monitor the progression of Parkinson's disease and assess the effects of medications commonly used by people with this neurodegenerative disorder. Parkinson's disease affects neurons in an area of the brain that controls movement, causing tremors, difficulty walking and other motor problems.
Environment - Apr 13

When trees die during a period of drought, they die of thirst. Researchers from the University of Basel have demonstrated in a field study that a rapid collapse in the hydraulic system is responsible for tree death.

Health - Apr 8
Health

A new study published in Science Translational Medicine by EPFL professor Johan Auwerx and scientists from EPFL start-up Amazentis highlights the effectiveness of mitophagy-stimulating molecule Urolithin A in mice to cure a disease similar to Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

Pharmacology - Apr 9
Pharmacology

Cognitive motor training helps in the fight against Alzheimer's and dementia, as demonstrated for the first time in a study by an international team of researchers with ETH Zurich involvement.

Health - Apr 8

By adopting a few simple measures, farmers can drastically reduce the use of antibiotics and improve the well-being of their animals without economic disadvantages. This was confirmed in a field trial- the first of its kind in Switzerland - carried out by researchers of the University of Bern based on the specially developed "outdoor veal calf" method.


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Health - Pharmacology - 13.04.2021
Parkinson's disease: wearable sensors to track symptoms
Scientists have developed algorithms that, combined with wearable sensors, could help clinicians to monitor the progression of Parkinson's disease and assess the effects of medications commonly used by people with this neurodegenerative disorder. Parkinson's disease affects neurons in an area of the brain that controls movement, causing tremors, difficulty walking and other motor problems.

Environment - 13.04.2021
Tree hydraulics and water relations: why trees die as a result of drought
When trees die during a period of drought, they die of thirst. Researchers from the University of Basel have demonstrated in a field study that a rapid collapse in the hydraulic system is responsible for tree death. And they found out that the trees possibly die more rapidly than previously thought.

Pharmacology - Health - 09.04.2021
Fighting dementia with play
Fighting dementia with play
Cognitive motor training helps in the fight against Alzheimer's and dementia, as demonstrated for the first time in a study by an international team of researchers with ETH Zurich involvement. The training platform used was developed by an ETH Zurich spin-off. A dementia diagnosis turns the world upside down, not only for the person affected but also for their relatives, as brain function gradually declines.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.04.2021
Urolithin A shows effective against muscular dystrophy
Urolithin A shows effective against muscular dystrophy
A new study published in Science Translational Medicine by EPFL professor Johan Auwerx and scientists from EPFL start-up Amazentis highlights the effectiveness of mitophagy-stimulating molecule Urolithin A in mice to cure a disease similar to Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. And points to a possible treatment for affected people.

Health - Pharmacology - 08.04.2021
Veal calf fattening: it can work with less antibiotics
By adopting a few simple measures, farmers can drastically reduce the use of antibiotics and improve the well-being of their animals without economic disadvantages. This was confirmed in a field trial- the first of its kind in Switzerland - carried out by researchers of the University of Bern based on the specially developed "outdoor veal calf" method.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 08.04.2021
Modern Human Brain Originated in Africa Around 1.7 Million Years Ago
Modern Human Brain Originated in Africa Around 1.7 Million Years Ago
The human brain as we know it today is relatively young. It evolved about 1.7 million years ago when the culture of stone tools in Africa became increasingly complex. A short time later, the new Homo populations spread to Southeast Asia, researchers from the University of Zurich have now shown using computed tomography analyses of fossilized skulls.

Physics - 07.04.2021
Hint for new particles
Hint for new particles
The US research laboratory "Fermilab" has published the eagerly awaited results of the experimental measurement of the so-called anomalous magnetic dipole moment of the muon. As members of the "Muon g-2 Theory Initiative", researchers from the University of Bern have calculated the same physical quantity theoretically in parallel, based on the Standard Model.

Health - 07.04.2021
Conspiracy theories and cognitive biases in the Covid-19 pandemic
Conspiracy theories and cognitive biases in the Covid-19 pandemic
Conspiracy theories appear to be increasing in popularity as the Covid-19 pandemic continues. But to what extent do people really agree with them, and what is the association with cognitive biases? A research team from the University of Basel studied these questions in German-speaking Switzerland and Germany.

Physics - Life Sciences - 07.04.2021
Artificial intelligence to explore the biomolecular world
Artificial intelligence to explore the biomolecular world
Scientists have developed AI-powered nanosensors that let researchers track various kinds of biological molecules without disturbing them.  The tiny world of biomolecules is rich in fascinating interactions between a plethora of different agents such as intricate nanomachines (proteins), shape-shifting vessels (lipid complexes), chains of vital information (DNA) and energy fuel (carbohydrates).

Chemistry - 07.04.2021
Chain length determines molecular colour
Chain length determines molecular colour
Researchers at ETH Zurich have developed fluorescent polymers whose colour can be easily tuned. Depending on their length, the polymers emit a different colour. Potential applications include biomedicine, security printing and solar energy. Around the world, a huge amount of research and development work is currently being done on carbon-containing, or organic, molecules that emit coloured light after appropriate excitation.

Life Sciences - 06.04.2021
How the fly selects its reproductive male
How the fly selects its reproductive male
Researchers from the University of Geneva have discovered a very small protein in Drosophila that plays a key role in how females select the semen that will fertilize its eggs when it mates with several males. Even a well-characterized genome, such as that of the Drosophila the so-called fruit fly, still holds surprises.

Computer Science - Innovation - 06.04.2021
Topological data analysis can help predict stock-market crashes
Topological data analysis can help predict stock-market crashes
Scientists, together with local startup L2F, have developed a robust model that can predict when a systemic shift is about to occur, based on methods from a branch of mathematics called topological data analysis. Topological data analysis (TDA) involves extracting information from clouds of data points and using the information to classify data, recognize patterns or predict trends, for example.

Materials Science - Economics / Business - 02.04.2021

Health - Pharmacology - 31.03.2021
Promising Treatment Alternative Against Parasitic Worm Infection
Promising Treatment Alternative Against Parasitic Worm Infection
Strongyloidiasis, a parasitic worm infection caused by soil-transmitted helminths, remains a neglected public health problem with limited treatment options. Swiss TPH researchers conducted the first dose-finding study with moxidectin against strongyloidiasis. The drug could become a treatment alternative to the only treatment available so far and help fill the empty anthelminthic drug pipeline.

Media - Politics - 31.03.2021
A physical party to prove you're a real virtual person
A physical party to prove you're a real virtual person
The ease of creating fake virtual identities plays an important role in shaping the way information - and misinformation - circulates online. Could 'pseudonym' parties, that would verify proof of personhood not proof of identity, resolve this tension' Social media platforms have completely changed the way information flows online.

Life Sciences - 31.03.2021
Study contributes to our understanding of how cocaine withdrawal affects brain circuits
Study contributes to our understanding of how cocaine withdrawal affects brain circuits
The results could help clinicians understand addiction and enable people to better manage substance withdrawal Geneva & Lausanne, Switzerland - Cocaine is a highly addictive substance that, in the long term, can have adverse effects on health and wellbeing. There are around 18 million cocaine users globally, according to a UN report.

Environment - 31.03.2021
Carbon-neutral Biofuel from Lakes
Carbon-neutral Biofuel from Lakes
Lakes store huge amounts of methane. In a new study, environmental scientists at the University of Basel offer suggestions for how it can be extracted and used as an energy source in the form of methanol. Discussion about the current climate crisis usually focuses on carbon dioxide (CO2). The greenhouse gas methane is less well known, but although it is much rarer in the atmosphere, its global warming potential is 80 to 100 times greater per unit.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 31.03.2021
Two strange planets
Two strange planets
Uranus and Neptune both have a completely skewed magnetic field, perhaps due to the planets- special inner structures. But new experiments by ETH researchers now show that the mystery remains unsolved. The two large gas planets Uranus and Neptune have strange magnetic fields. These are each strongly tilted relative to the planet's rotation axes and are significantly offset from the physical centre of the planet.

Physics - Chemistry - 31.03.2021
ALPHA cools antimatter using laser light for the first time
ALPHA cools antimatter using laser light for the first time
Geneva, 31 March 2021. The ALPHA collaboration at CERN has succeeded in cooling down antihydrogen atoms - the simplest form of atomic antimatter - using laser light. The technique, known as laser cooling, was first demonstrated 40 years ago on normal matter and is a mainstay of many research fields.

Environment - Life Sciences - 30.03.2021
Precisely determining toxic concentrations
Precisely determining toxic concentrations
Ecotoxicological tests need to be extremely accurate - which often poses challenges in research and practice. Eawag has now developed a computer model that enables even more accurate testing at high throughput; the model is simple, widely applicable and saves resources. How dangerous are chemicals that enter water bodies for aquatic life' To answer this question, tests are needed on organisms - or as is increasingly the case - on isolated cells, which can replace tests on organisms.
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