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Results 41 - 60 of 546.


Health - Life Sciences - 28.11.2023
Reprogramming tissue mechanically
Reprogramming tissue mechanically
Researchers at PSI and ETH Zurich have taken connective tissue cells that have been mechanically reprogrammed to resemble stem cells and transplanted them into damaged skin. In their laboratory experiment, they were able to show that this can promote wound healing. Mature somatic cells can be turned back into youthful, stem-cell-like cells by means of a surprisingly simple mechanical stimulus.

Health - Materials Science - 28.11.2023
Bacteria, stay out!
Bacteria, stay out!
Antimicrobial hospital curtains Hospital germs and pathogens are not always transmitted directly from person to person. They can also spread via germ-contaminated surfaces and objects. researchers, together with the chemical company BASF, Spiez Laboratory and the Technical University of Berlin, have now developed coated textiles that inhibit or even kill pathogens.

Environment - Life Sciences - 28.11.2023
Protection of Highly Threatened Sharks and Rays Inadequate
Paleontology Sharks, rays and skates are the ocean's most threatened vertebrate group. Research led by the University of Zurich into their functional diversity has now revealed previously overlooked, critical conservation priorities, thereby underscoring the urgent need for targeted action to safeguard the threatened species.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 27.11.2023
Molecular cooperation at the threshold of life
Molecular cooperation at the threshold of life
Protein-like aggregates known as amyloids can bind to molecules of genetic material. It is possible that these two types of molecules stabilised each other during the development of life - and that this might even have paved the way for the genetic code. How organisms develop from inanimate matter is one of the biggest questions in science.

Health - Life Sciences - 27.11.2023
How bacterial cords spread tuberculosis
How bacterial cords spread tuberculosis
A groundbreaking study reveals how Mycobacterium tuberculosis forms resilient cords within host cells, opening the way for a deeper understanding and innovative treatment of tuberculosis. Tuberculosis is a lung disease caused by the Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacterium (Mtb). According , tuberculosis afflicts 10 million people globally and claims 1.5 million lives.

Life Sciences - Environment - 24.11.2023
How plants determine where light comes from
How plants determine where light comes from
With no visual organs, how can a plant know where light is coming from? In an original study combining biological and engineering expertise, the team led by Prof. Christian Fankhauser at the University of Lausanne, in collaboration with colleagues at EPFL, has deciphered a novel mechanism using the interface between air and water to generate a gradient of light "visible" to the plant.

Health - Pharmacology - 24.11.2023
Treating tumors with engineered dendritic cells
Treating tumors with engineered dendritic cells
Cancer biologists at EPFL, UNIGE, and the German Cancer Research Center (Heidelberg) have developed a novel immunotherapy that does not require knowledge of a tumor's antigenic makeup. The new results may pave the way to first-in-kind clinical applications. Dendritic cells (DCs) work at the forefront of the immune system.

Chemistry - Pharmacology - 23.11.2023
Artificial intelligence finds ways to develop new drugs
Artificial intelligence finds ways to develop new drugs
A new AI model developed by chemists at ETH Zurich can not only predict where a pharmaceutically active molecule can be chemically modified, but also how best to do it. This makes it possible to identify new pharmaceutical ingredients more quickly and improve existing ones in a targeted manner. New active pharmaceutical ingredients lay the foundations for innovative and better medical treatments.

Earth Sciences - Physics - 23.11.2023
Predicting earthquakes and tsunamis with fibre-optic networks
Geophysicists at ETH Zurich have shown that every single wave of a magnitude 3.9 earthquake registers in the noise suppression system of fibre-optic networks.

Life Sciences - 23.11.2023
Pregnancy remodels the brain: stem cells shape the sense of smell in mothers
Pregnancy remodels the brain: stem cells shape the sense of smell in mothers
Pregnancy and motherhood lead to brain remodeling. A research team at the University of Basel has now discovered through experiments with mice that distinct pools of stem cells in the adult brain are turned on during pregnancy. They give rise to specific types of olfactory bulb neurons, the team reports in "Science".

Environment - Life Sciences - 23.11.2023
Scientists explore hidden dynamics in peat under mosses and shrubs
Scientists explore hidden dynamics in peat under mosses and shrubs
Global warming is causing extensive changes to peatland vegetation in Europe and Western Siberia, with consequences for soil composition and the peatlands' ability to sequester carbon. An EPFL-led study has examined the mechanisms behind these complex processes. Peatlands are significant carbon sinks, meaning they're potential time bombs when it comes to greenhouse gas emissions.

Environment - Social Sciences - 22.11.2023
Durability: young people use their phones longer
Durability: young people use their phones longer
Young Swiss use their smartphones for almost three years before replacing them. That's almost a year longer than in 2016, according to the latest JAMESfocus report from ZHAW and Swisscom. While technical features and price remain central for young people when buying a cell phone, sustainability criteria are also gaining in importance .

Computer Science - Astronomy / Space - 22.11.2023
AI helps detecting plastic in oceans
AI helps detecting plastic in oceans
A research team from EPFL and Wageningen University has developed a new artificial intelligence model that recognises floating plastics much more accurately in satellite images than before. This could help to systematically remove plastic litter from the oceans with ships. Our society relies heavily on plastic products and the amount of plastic waste is expected to increase in the future.

Life Sciences - Health - 22.11.2023
Halting a malformation of the heart
Halting a malformation of the heart
Researchers at ETH Zurich have now shown that a previously unknown protein plays a key role in a congenital malformation of the heart. Their findings point the way towards new treatment options. Through the experiments on the genetically modified mice, her team determined which molecular switches are involved and how they need to be thrown to halt the malformations that damage the heart.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.11.2023
Wireless in the blood
Wireless in the blood
Biological computing machines, such as micro and nano-implants that can collect important information inside the human body, are transforming medicine. Yet, networking them for communication has proven challenging. Now, a global team, including researchers, has developed a protocol that enables a molecular network with multiple transmitters.

History / Archeology - 21.11.2023
Neanderthals were the world's first artists
Neanderthals were the world’s first artists
Recent research has shown that engravings in a cave in La Roche-Cotard (France), which has been sealed for thousands of years, were actually made by Neanderthals. This research was performed by Basel archaeologist Dorota Wojtczak together with a team of researchers from France and Denmark, whose findings reveal that the Neanderthals were in fact the first humans with an appreciation of art.

Life Sciences - 21.11.2023
Sophisticated swarming: Bacteria support each other across generations
Sophisticated swarming: Bacteria support each other across generations
When bacteria build communities, they cooperate and share nutrients across generations. Researchers at the University of Basel have been able to demonstrate this for the first time using a newly developed method. This innovative technique enables the tracking of gene expression during the development of bacterial communities over space and time.

Environment - Innovation - 21.11.2023
New technology can collect CO2 from a truck's exhaust pipe
New technology can collect CO2 from a truck's exhaust pipe
EPFL spin-off Qaptis has developed a system that can cut freight trucks' carbon emissions by up to 90%.

Civil Engineering - Environment - 20.11.2023
The future of construction with more sustainable cement
The future of construction with more sustainable cement
A new material developed at EPFL could change how we make cement forever - and cut 500 million tons of emissions by 2030.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.11.2023
New approaches for medical diagnostics
New approaches for medical diagnostics
An international research group led by the University of Lucerne has developed novel approaches for medical imaging. These hold great potential for earlier diagnosis, more precise localization and a better understanding of many human diseases. Imaging procedures such as computed tomography (CT) or positron emission tomography (PET) are nowadays indispensable for the diagnosis and localization of many diseases.