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Results 41 - 60 of 87.


Physics - Chemistry - 31.01.2024
How to make bright quantum dots even brighter
How to make bright quantum dots even brighter
Researchers at Empa and ETH have developed methods for making perovskite quantum dots faster and more efficient emitters, thereby significantly improving their brightness. This is relevant for applications in displays as well as in quantum technologies. Quantum dots are a kind of artificial atom: just a few nanometres in size and made of semiconductor materials, they can emit light of a specific colour or even single photons, which is important for quantum technologies.

Life Sciences - Health - 31.01.2024
Firing Nerve Fibers in the Brain Are Supplied with Energy on Demand
Firing Nerve Fibers in the Brain Are Supplied with Energy on Demand
To rapidly transmit electrical signals in the brain, the long nerve fibers are insulated by specialized cells called oligodendrocytes. These cells also respond to the electrical signals of active nerve fibers and provide them with energy on demand, as researchers have discovered. If this process, regulated by potassium, is disabled in mice, the nerve fibers are severely damaged as the animals age - resembling the defects of neurodegenerative diseases.

Health - 31.01.2024
COVID-19: How effective was contact tracing?
COVID-19: How effective was contact tracing?
Based on data from Geneva, Switzerland, a team from the University of Geneva and the HUG assessed the effectiveness of contact tracing in controlling the pandemic. During the COVID-19 pandemic, Switzerland, like many other countries, relied on contact tracing to identify people likely to have been contaminated by an infected acquaintance.

Microtechnics - Environment - 30.01.2024
Robot swings its way to unexplored treetops
Robot swings its way to unexplored treetops
It abseils from a height and swings around obstacles: robot Avocado will one day manoeuvre through the canopy of the rainforest and collect data for researchers about this hard-to-reach habitat. It's called Avocado and does actually look a bit like one: currently being developed by researcher on, the innovative robot has a robust housing similar in shape to the green fruit.

Electroengineering - Microtechnics - 30.01.2024
Artificial muscles - lighter, safer, more robust
Artificial muscles - lighter, safer, more robust
Researchers at ETH Zurich have recently developed artificial muscles for robot motion. Their solution offers several advantages over previous technologies: it can be used wherever robots need to be soft rather than rigid or where they need more sensitivity when interacting with their environment. Many roboticists dream of building robots that are not just a combination of metal or other hard materials and motors but also softer and more adaptable.

Health - 29.01.2024
Reducing Health Inequities in the Prevention of Cervical Cancer
Reducing Health Inequities in the Prevention of Cervical Cancer
Cervical cancer is the leading cause of cancer related deaths among women in sub-Saharan Africa. Women living with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are six times more likely to develop cervical cancer than those who are HIV negative. To tackle this issue, Swiss TPH together with partners developed the Cervical Cancer Prevention and Care Cascade - a framework to enhance cervical cancer screening programmes for women living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa.

Materials Science - Innovation - 29.01.2024
Sound-powered sensors stand to save millions of batteries
Sound-powered sensors stand to save millions of batteries
Researchers at ETH Zurich have developed a sensor that utilises energy from sound waves to control electronic devices. This could one day save millions of batteries. Sensors that monitor infrastructure, such as bridges or buildings, or are used in medical devices, such as prostheses for the deaf, require a constant supply of power.

Physics - 29.01.2024
Turning glass into a 'transparent' light-energy harvester
Turning glass into a ’transparent' light-energy harvester
Physicists propose a novel way to create photoconductive circuits, where the circuit is directly patterned onto a glass surface with femtosecond laser light. The new technology may one day be useful for harvesting energy, while remaining transparent to light and using a single material. What happens when you expose tellurite glass to femtosecond laser light?

Environment - Earth Sciences - 26.01.2024
Glacier melting destroys important climate data archive
Glacier melting destroys important climate data archive
As part of the Ice Memory initiative, PSI researchers, with colleagues from the University of Fribourg and Ca' Foscari University of Venice as well as the Institute of Polar Sciences of the Italian National Research Council (CNR), analysed ice cores drilled in 2018 and 2020 from the Corbassière glacier at Grand Combin in the canton of Valais.

Environment - History / Archeology - 26.01.2024
Ozone stresses European forests
Ozone stresses European forests
Ozone causes visible damage to the foliage of European deciduous trees, as shown by a large-scale study led by the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research WSL. The researchers found that some plants under certain environmental condition react particularly sensitively to ozone, which is toxic at ground level.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 25.01.2024
'Mini-placentas' shed light on early events that are key for a successful pregnancy
’Mini-placentas’ shed light on early events that are key for a successful pregnancy
The placenta provides oxygen and nutrients to a growing baby, but its early interactions with a mother's uterus remain an enigma.

Computer Science - 25.01.2024
Video game disorders: how to identify at-risk gamers?
Video game disorders: how to identify at-risk gamers?
Researchers from the Universities of Bordeaux and Lausanne have just published a study showing that the time spent playing video games has no influence on the quality of life of adult gamers.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 25.01.2024
How gases travel laterally through a lake
How gases travel laterally through a lake
At night or during cold winter days, lake water cools faster near the shore than in the middle of the lake. This creates a current that connects the shallow shore region with the deeper part of the lake. An international team led by researchers were able to show for the first time that this horizontal circulation transports gases such as oxygen and methane.

Pharmacology - Health - 24.01.2024
Innovative dengue vaccine successfully tested
Innovative dengue vaccine successfully tested
Unisanté (University of Lausanne) has conducted a clinical study on a new type of vaccine that induces cellular immunity to combat dengue fever. The results have just been published in The Lancet eBioMedicine. They are positive and encourage further investigation. This approach is also promising for other diseases.

Environment - 24.01.2024
Groundwater levels are sinking ever faster around the world
Groundwater levels are sinking ever faster around the world
A global study shows that the world's groundwater resources are dwindling: levels are falling sharply worldwide, and the decline has accelerated in the 21st century. Nevertheless, there is still reason for hope. At the beginning of November, The New York Times ran the headline, "America is using up its groundwater like there's no tomorrow." The journalists from the renowned media outlet had published an investigation into the state of groundwater reserves in the United States.

Social Sciences - 24.01.2024
Young People from Poorer Families Make Fewer Friends
A new study has found that children growing up in low-income families have fewer opportunities to make friends and to socially integrate at school. Researchers from the University of Zurich and the University of Stockholm examined data from over 200 school classes in Sweden and reached this conclusion.

Health - History / Archeology - 24.01.2024
Syphilis-like diseases were already widespread in America before the arrival of Columbus
Syphilis-like diseases were already widespread in America before the arrival of Columbus
Researchers at the Universities of Basel and Zurich have discovered the genetic material of the pathogen Treponema pallidum in the bones of people who died in Brazil 2,000 years ago. This is the oldest verified discovery of this pathogen thus far, and it proves that humans were suffering from diseases akin to syphilis - known as treponematoses - long before Columbus's discovery of America.

Physics - Electroengineering - 24.01.2024
A new state in a quantum material
A new state in a quantum material
Scientists at EPFL break new ground in quantum physics, revealing a mysterious and unique behavior in a quantum magnetic material and hinting at future tech breakthroughs. In the mysterious world of quantum materials, things don't always behave as we expect. These materials have unique properties governed by the rules of quantum mechanics, which often means that they can perform tasks in ways traditional materials cannot - like conducting electricity without loss - or having magnetic properties that may prove useful in advanced technologies.

Health - Environment - 23.01.2024
Heat islands have an impact on health costs
Heat islands have an impact on health costs
A new study has produced the first cost estimate of the impact that urban heat islands have on human health. The study looked at 85 European cities over the course of three full years, meaning it also took into account the protection that heat islands offer in winter - an aspect that has been little studied until now.

Pharmacology - Chemistry - 22.01.2024
New agent blocks stress response
New agent blocks stress response
If the body's natural stress response gets knocked off balance, it can result in physical and mental health disorders. Researchers at ETH Zurich have developed an agent capable of selectively inhibiting this response. Stress isn't merely an oppressive feeling we experience when we're overwhelmed; it's the body's natural reaction to acute or persistent strain.



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