news

« BACK

Electroengineering



Results 21 - 40 of 47.


Physics - Electroengineering - 15.05.2017
Quantum reservoir for microwaves
Quantum reservoir for microwaves
EPFL researchers use a mechanical micrometer-size drum cooled close to the quantum ground state to amplify microwaves in a superconducting circuit. Image: Photograph of the chip used in the experiment to couple a microwave cavity to a micrometer-size drum (the sharp purple pencil tip is placed as a scale).

Physics - Electroengineering - 12.05.2017
One laser is enough
One laser is enough
Gases in the environment can be spectroscopically probed fast and precisely using so-called dual frequency combs. Researchers at ETH have now developed a method by which such frequency combs can be created much more simply and cheaply than before. In contrast to the light emitted by a simple lamp, laser light has a very precisely defined frequency.

Physics - Electroengineering - 09.03.2017
Artificial magnetic fields for photons
Artificial magnetic fields for photons
Light particles do not usually react to magnetic fields. Researchers at ETH Zurich have now shown how photons can still be influenced by electric and magnetic fields. In the future that method could be used to create strong artificial magnetic fields for photons. In modern information technology there is a rather clear division of labour between light particles (photons), used for transmitting data fast and reliably over large distances, and electrons, which are responsible for data processing in computer chips.

Electroengineering - 22.12.2016
The fight against creeping cables
The fight against creeping cables
Switzerland's overhead power lines are showing signs of old age and can be damaged by power surges. But how long will they actually last? Empa researchers have developed a tool to keep tabs on the aging process.

Physics - Electroengineering - 07.11.2016
Earth's magnetic field under the ‘simulation magnifying glass'
Earth’s magnetic field under the ‘simulation magnifying glass’
Earth's magnetic field has reversed direction hundreds of times in the course of our planet's history.

Physics - Electroengineering - 06.09.2016
En route to better transformers
En route to better transformers
Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI have found a way of looking inside the iron core of transformers. Transformers are indispensable in regulating electricity both in industry and in domestic households. The better their iron cores are magnetized, the less energy they lose and the more efficiently they work.

Electroengineering - 05.07.2016
Using servers for home heating
Using servers for home heating
05.07.16 - Summer Series on Student Projects - For his Bachelor's degree in electrical engineering, Karim Ziadé assessed the feasibility of putting data centers into residential buildings for heating purposes.

Health - Electroengineering - 20.06.2016
A tiny pump comes to the aid of weakened hearts
A tiny pump comes to the aid of weakened hearts
20.06.16 - EPFL researchers have developed an innovative cardiac support system in the form of a small ring placed on the aorta.

Health - Electroengineering - 02.03.2016
Diabetes: a smart shoe to help reduce amputations
Diabetes: a smart shoe to help reduce amputations
02.03.16 - EPFL researchers have developed a shoe sole with valves that electronically control the pressure applied to the arch of the foot.

Materials Science - Electroengineering - 29.02.2016
Stretchable electronics that quadruple in length
Stretchable electronics that quadruple in length
29.02.16 - EPFL researchers have developed conductive tracks that can be bent and stretched up to four times their original length. They could be used in artificial skin, connected clothing and on-body sensors. Conductive tracks are usually hard printed on a board. But those recently developed at EPFL are altogether different: they are almost as flexible as rubber and can be stretched up to four times their original length and in all directions.

Electroengineering - Materials Science - 25.01.2016
Producing electrical power with cardboard, tape, and a pencil
Producing electrical power with cardboard, tape, and a pencil
A small device made from everyday materials can generate enough energy to power several diodes. This clever discovery by an EPFL researcher was presented yesterday at a global conference on microand nanosystems in Shanghai.

Electroengineering - Materials Science - 20.01.2016
Charging an electric car as fast as filling a tank of gas
Charging an electric car as fast as filling a tank of gas
20.01.16 - Electric cars will be competitive when they can be charged in the time it takes to fill the gas tank.

Earth Sciences - Electroengineering - 11.12.2015
Upside-down lightning strikes
Upside-down lightning strikes
11.12.15 - Upward lightning strikes initiate on the ground and head skyward. These discharges, which usually begin at the top of tall and slender structures, pose a real risk for wind turbines.

Electroengineering - 10.11.2015
Going back in time to locate short circuits in power grids
Going back in time to locate short circuits in power grids
10.11.15 - EPFL researchers have come up with a method to determine the exact location of short circuits in a power grid. This is an important step towards operating complex power grid topologies that enable the massive integration of renewable energy resources. When a high-voltage power line is damaged by wind, ice or a tree, electricity utilities must quickly find the fault location and repair it to meet the power quality requirements or avoid cascade blackout.

Physics - Electroengineering - 21.09.2015
Tiny magnets mimic steam, water and ice
Tiny magnets mimic steam, water and ice
Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) created a synthetic material out of 1 billion tiny magnets. Astonishingly, it now appears that the magnetic properties of this so-called metamaterial change with the temperature, so that it can take on different states; just like water has a gaseous, liquid and a solid state.

Electroengineering - 28.01.2015
Electronic circuits with reconfigurable pathways closer to reality
Electronic circuits with reconfigurable pathways closer to reality
Multitasking circuits capable of reconfiguring themselves in real time and switching functions as the need arises - this is the promising application stemming from a discovery made at EPFL and published. Other potential uses: miniaturising our electronic devices and developing resilient circuits. Will it be possible one day to reconfigure electronic microchips however we want, even when they are in use? A recent discovery by a team at EPFL suggests as much.

Physics - Electroengineering - 06.03.2014
Observed live with x-ray laser: electricity controls magnetism
Observed live with x-ray laser: electricity controls magnetism
Data on a hard drive is stored by flipping small magnetic domains. Researchers have now changed the magnetic arrangement in a material much faster than is possible with today's hard drives. The researchers used a new technique where an electric field triggers these changes, in contrast to the magnetic fields commonly used in consumer devices.

Physics - Electroengineering - 31.08.2011
An innovative method for measuring nanoparticles
An innovative method for measuring nanoparticles
Precise measurement of the molecular weight, size and density of a nanoparticle in a single procedure is now possible, thanks to an ultracentrifugation method. Although nanoparticles are used in a variety of domains - such as medicine, solar energy and photonics - there is still much about them to be discovered.

Electroengineering - Environment - 29.08.2011
A high-tech propulsion system for the next 100 years
A high-tech propulsion system for the next 100 years
Environmentally friendly fuels are not just of interest for use in cars. The University of Birmingham has been operating a canal boat with a fuel cell drive for three years now.

Mechanical Engineering - Electroengineering - 03.08.2011
A new motor for the watch of tomorrow
A new motor for the watch of tomorrow
An electromagnetic three-phase motor will enable the watchmaking industry to build watches that are three times more efficient and that can include more applications.