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Materials Science - Physics - 26.05.2020
Watching single protons moving at water-solid interfaces
Watching single protons moving at water-solid interfaces
Scientists at EPFL have been able to observe single protons moving at the interface between water and a solid surface. Their research reveals the strong interactions of these charges with surfaces. The H+ proton consists of a single ion of hydrogen, the smallest and lightest of all the chemical elements.

Physics - Materials Science - 25.05.2020
Lossless conduction at the edges
Lossless conduction at the edges
Atomically thin layers of the semimetal tungsten ditelluride conduct electricity losslessly along narrow, one-dimensional channels at the crystal edges. The material is therefore a second-order topological insulator. By obtaining experimental proof of this behavior, physicists from the University of Basel have expanded the pool of candidate materials for topological superconductivity.

Life Sciences - Physics - 20.05.2020
Elucidating the mechanism of a light-driven sodium pump
Elucidating the mechanism of a light-driven sodium pump
Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI have succeeded for the first time in recording, in action, a light-driven sodium pump from bacterial cells.  The findings promise progress in the development of new methods in neurobiology. The researchers used the new X-ray free-electron laser SwissFEL for their investigations.

Physics - 13.05.2020
Speeding up long-range coherent LiDAR
Speeding up long-range coherent LiDAR
LiDAR is a technique used for measuring distances with laser light. In a study published in Nature, researchers at EPFL show a new way to speed up a type of LiDAR engine by using photonic circuits. Light detection and ranging (LiDAR) comprised an array of techniques using laser light to measure distances by multiplying the time delay between transmitted and received optical signals with the speed of light.

Physics - 12.05.2020
Transistor sets a new standard for energy efficiency
Transistor sets a new standard for energy efficiency
Researchers at EPFL's Nanoelectronic Devices Laboratory (Nanolab), working under Professor Adrian Ionescu, have designed and demonstrated a new type of technology based on 2D semiconducting materials that's almost as energy-efficient as the human brain. Smartphones, laptops and smartwatches consume vast quantities of energy, yet only around half of this energy is actually used to power important functions.

Physics - Materials Science - 07.05.2020
Laser loop couples quantum systems over a distance
Laser loop couples quantum systems over a distance
For the first time, researchers have succeeded in creating strong coupling between quantum systems over a greater distance. They accomplished this with a novel method in which a laser loop connects the systems, enabling nearly lossless exchange of information and strong interaction between them. In the scientific journal Science, the physicists from the University of Basel and University of Hanover reported that the new method opens up new possibilities in quantum networks and quantum sensor technology.

Chemistry - Physics - 01.05.2020
In search of the lighting material of the future
In search of the lighting material of the future
At the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI, researchers have gained insights into a promising material for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). The substance enables high light yields and would be inexpensive to produce on a large scale - that means it is practically made for use in large-area room lighting.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 23.04.2020
A major step towards the explanation of the matter-antimatter asymmetry
A major step towards the explanation of the matter-antimatter asymmetry
The international T2K Collaboration has published results showing the strongest evidence to date implying the breaking of the symmetry between matter and antimatter in so-called neutrino oscillations. This is a major step towards the understanding of the dominance of matter over antimatter in the Universe.

Physics - 22.04.2020
A material with a particular twist
A material with a particular twist
In a material made of two thin crystal layers that are slightly twisted with respect to each other, researchers at ETH have studied the behaviour of strongly interacting electrons. Doing so, they found a number of surprising properties. Many modern technologies are based on special materials, such as the semiconductors that are important for computers, inside of which electrons can move more or less freely.

Physics - Electroengineering - 20.04.2020
Photonic microwave generation using on-chip optical frequency combs
Photonic microwave generation using on-chip optical frequency combs
Using integrated photonic chips fabricated at EPFL, scientists have demonstrated laser-based microwave generators. These microwave signals, as well as their optical carriers, could be used in radars, satellite communications and future 5G wireless networks. In our information society, the synthesis, distribution, and processing of radio and microwave signals are ubiquitous in wireless networks, telecommunications, and radars.

Physics - 17.04.2020
MegaX, the first camera to capture the smallest particles of light
MegaX, the first camera to capture the smallest particles of light
EPFL scientists, working in association with Canon, have developed a camera that can take 3D images with record-breaking speed and resolution "It's something I'd been dreaming of for a long time," says Edoardo Charbon, an EPFL professor and head of the Advanced Quantum Architecture Laboratory in EPFL's School of Engineering.

Physics - 01.04.2020
Shortage of certain products explained by quantum physics
Shortage of certain products explained by quantum physics
All the media talk about the lack of certain products in the stores in connection with the Covid-19 pandemic.

Physics - Electroengineering - 25.03.2020
A nanoscale device that can see through walls
A nanoscale device that can see through walls
Researchers at EPFL have developed a nanodevice that operates more than 10 times faster than today's fastest transistors, and about 100 times faster than the transistors you have on your computers. This new device enables the generation of high-power terahertz waves. These waves, which are notoriously difficult to produce, are useful in a rich variety of applications ranging from imaging and sensing to high-speed wireless communications.

Chemistry - Physics - 18.03.2020
Chemistry: Access to forbidden rings
Chemistry: Access to forbidden rings
Researchers from the University of Geneva have developed a new method for creating chains of molecular rings with unparalleled sophistication. Cyclic molecules are everywhere, and everything around us stems from the way they are assembled: not just taste, colour and smell but also (for example) pharmaceutical drugs.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 10.03.2020
Solved: the mystery of the expansion of the universe
Solved: the mystery of the expansion of the universe
A researcher from the University of Geneva has solved a scientific controversy about the speed of the expansion of the universe by suggesting that it is not totally homogeneous on a large scale. The earth, solar system, entire Milky Way and the few thousand galaxies closest to us move in a vast "bubble" that is 250 million light years in diameter, where the average density of matter is half as large as for the rest of the universe.

Computer Science - Physics - 10.03.2020
Introducing the light-operated hard drives of tomorrow
Introducing the light-operated hard drives of tomorrow
What do you get when you place a thin film of perovkite material used in solar cells on top of a magnetic substrate? More efficient hard drive technology. EPFL physicist László Forró and his team pave the way for the future of data storage. "The key was to get the technology to work at room temperature," explains László Forró, EPFL physicist.

Computer Science - Physics - 03.03.2020
Solving problems of analytic continuation through machine learning
Solving problems of analytic continuation through machine learning
An EPFL student has shown how deep learning can be used to analytically connect digital simulations and experimental results more quickly and reliably than conventional methods. This work, which the student carried out for his semester project, was recently published in Physical Review Letters. It's not unusual for scientists to compare experimental results with the predictions made by theoretical models.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 28.02.2020
Tracking down the mystery of matter
Tracking down the mystery of matter
Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI have measured a property of the neutron more precisely than ever before. In the process they found out that the elementary particle has a significantly smaller electric dipole moment than was previously assumed. With that, it has also become less likely that this dipole moment can help to explain the origin of all matter in the universe.

Chemistry - Physics - 27.02.2020
Tying up molecules as easily as you tie up your laces
Tying up molecules as easily as you tie up your laces
UNIGE researchers have succeeded in tying molecules together, thereby modifying their intrinsic mechanical properties. Knots are all around us: in computer cables, headphones and wires. But, although they can be a nuisance, they're also very useful when it comes to tying up your laces or when you go sailing.

Physics - Health - 26.02.2020
Glass slides that stand to revolutionize fluorescence microscopy
Glass slides that stand to revolutionize fluorescence microscopy
EPFL scientists have developed a new type of microscope slide that can boost the amount of light in fluorescence microscopy by a factor of up to 25. These new slides can both amplify and direct light, making them ideal for applications ranging from early-stage diagnosis to the rapid archiving of pathology samples.
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