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Health - 23.07.2024 - Today
Political Campaigns Can Induce Stress in Minorities
Political Campaigns Can Induce Stress in Minorities
How did the 2021 national marriage equality referendum campaign in Switzerland affect the well-being of the LGBTIQ+ community? A team led by researchers at UZH has shown that LGBTIQ+ individuals and their cisgender heterosexual allies exhibited more stress hormones during the controversial campaign.

Life Sciences - Health - 22.07.2024
An over- or under-synchronised brain may predict psychosis
An over- or under-synchronised brain may predict psychosis
A team from the University of Geneva shows that overly strong or weak interconnections between certain brain areas could be a predictive marker of the disease. Is it possible to assess an individual's risk of psychosis? Identifying predictive markers is a key challenge in psychiatry. A team from the University of Geneva , part of the Synapsy Centre for Neuroscience and Mental Health Research, studied a cohort of patients with a 22q11.2DS microdeletion-a genetic anomaly linked to psychotic disorders.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.07.2024
Enhancing breast cancer diagnosis and treatment
Enhancing breast cancer diagnosis and treatment
Addressing problems with diagnosing and treating breast cancer, scientists at EPFL have developed EMBER, a tool that integrates breast cancer transcriptomic data from multiple databases. EMBER can improve precision oncology by accurately predicting molecular subtypes and therapy responses. Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer worldwide.

Health - Pharmacology - 18.07.2024
Improving HIV treatment for children and adolescents - the right way
Improving HIV treatment for children and adolescents - the right way
Globally, around 2.6 million children and adolescents are currently living with HIV, the majority of them in Africa. These young people are much more likely to experience treatment failure than adults. Experts long assumed that testing for viral drug resistance could improve treatment in cases where treatment has failed.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.07.2024
'Paleolithic' diets are not without risks
’Paleolithic’ diets are not without risks
A study highlights the toxicity risks of high-protein diets, which can lead to severe neurological disorders. High-protein diets, known as ''Paleolithic diets'', are popular. Using mouse models, scientists at the University of Geneva have studied their impact. While effective in regulating weight and stabilizing diabetes, these diets are not without risks.

Health - Innovation - 17.07.2024
A hydrogel implant to treat endometriosis
Researchers from ETH Zurich and Empa have developed a hydrogel implant that can help prevent endometriosis, a condition that affects a great many women. This innovation also acts as a contraceptive. Hydrogels have a variety of use cases, including contact lenses, delivering doses of medication within the body, moisturisers, water storage in soil, cleaning polluted water and as gelling and thickening agents.

Health - Pharmacology - 17.07.2024
Key Driver for Epithelial Cancer Development Identified
Key Driver for Epithelial Cancer Development Identified
A distinct signaling pathway called TNF- drives the transformation of epithelial cells into aggressive tumor cells. During cancer progression, cells activate their own TNF- program and become invasive. This finding could help to improve early detection and treatment of patients with cancers in skin, esophagus, bladder or colon, as researchers state.

Health - Life Sciences - 16.07.2024
Unraveling amyloid fibrils
Unraveling amyloid fibrils
Researchers at EPFL have discovered how amyloid fibrils form complex structures, shedding light on diseases like Alzheimer's and opening new doors in material science. Amyloids are protein aggregates that can form in the body, sometimes leading to diseases like Alzheimer's. These fibrils can adopt multiple shapes, known as "polymorphs", which complicate our understanding of their role in health and disease.

Health - Life Sciences - 15.07.2024
Autoantibodies Behind Lifelong Risk of Viral Infections
A new study shows that about two percent of the population develop autoantibodies against type 1 interferons, mostly later in life. This makes individuals more susceptible to viral diseases like COVID-19. The study, conducted by researchers together with a USZ team, is based on an analysis of a large collection of historical blood samples.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.07.2024
New Treatment Restores Gut Health and Growth in Malnourished Newborns
New Treatment Restores Gut Health and Growth in Malnourished Newborns
A new study published by the Grassi laboratory and collaborators in "Cell Reports Medicine" demonstrates that releasing the inhibitory effect of adenosine-triphosphate (ATP) on secretory IgA (Immunoglobulin A) production in the gut protects from enteropathy and restores growth in malnourished newborns.

Health - Pharmacology - 04.07.2024
New anti-aging therapy identified
New anti-aging therapy identified
Scientists from USI in collaboration with italian scientists have made a significant discovery by identifying a novel anti-aging therapeutic. The study is published in the prestigious journal "Nature Aging". Aging is a primary risk factor for the development of numerous chronic diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, arthritis, chronic kidney disease and cancer.

Life Sciences - Health - 04.07.2024
How our brain decodes other people's gaze
How our brain decodes other people’s gaze
A team from the University of Geneva has succeeded in determining the exact moment when the brain detects another person's gaze direction. The gaze plays a central role in everyday social interactions. Our capacity for instant communication relies on the brain's ability to detect and interpret the direction of others' gaze.

Life Sciences - Health - 04.07.2024
AI matches protein interaction partners
Scientists at EPFL unveil DiffPALM, an innovative AI method that enhances the prediction of protein interactions and our understanding of biological processes potentially relevant to medical applications. Proteins are the building blocks of life, involved in virtually every biological process. Understanding how proteins interact with each other is crucial for deciphering the complexities of cellular functions, and has significant implications for drug development and the treatment of diseases.

Health - Life Sciences - 02.07.2024
Why schizophrenia and apathy go hand in hand
By deciphering the neural response to a possible reward in people suffering from schizophrenia, a team from the University of Geneva and HUG explains the origin of the lack of motivation, one of the symptoms of the illness. Schizophrenia, which affects up to 1% of the population, is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by multiple symptoms.

Health - Pharmacology - 01.07.2024
Novel Blood Test Helps Improve Cancer Treatments
Novel Blood Test Helps Improve Cancer Treatments
Oncologists use biopsy and imaging techniques to diagnose and monitor tumor diseases and assess treatment success. UZH and USZ researchers have now further developed an advanced method to analyze liquid biopsies of DNA fragments in the blood. It is fast and practical, without putting much of a strain on patients.

Pharmacology - Health - 01.07.2024
Physical exercise prevents nerve damage during chemotherapy
Physical exercise prevents nerve damage during chemotherapy
Cancer treatments often cause nerve damage that can lead to long-lasting symptoms. Medication has proven ineffective in these cases. A sports scientist at the University of Basel, together with an interdisciplinary team from Germany, has now shown that simple exercises can prevent nerve damage. Cancer therapies have improved over the years.

Health - Pharmacology - 27.06.2024
The Mechanism Behind Melanoma Resistance to Treatment
In many cases of malignant melanoma, the effect of targeted treatment is lost over time. A research team from UZH and USZ has now discovered that a factor secreted by tumor cells is responsible for the resistance. These findings could pave the way for more effective therapies. Malignant melanoma is one of the most aggressive types of cancer.

Health - Pharmacology - 26.06.2024
New findings on skin disinfection before operations
New findings on skin disinfection before operations
Surgery carries the risk of infection at the surgical site. Proper skin disinfection before the incision minimizes this risk. Two disinfectants are used worldwide for this purpose, one of which was previously considered to be better. A joint study by Inselspital, Bern University Hospital and the University of Bern in collaboration with the University Hospitals of Basel and Zurich now shows that both agents are equally effective.

Health - 26.06.2024
Why some people with the flu may be more contagious
Why some people with the flu may be more contagious
Scientists have discovered that in indoor spaces, droplets containing the flu virus will remain infectious for longer when they also contain certain types of bacteria found in our respiratory tract. This finding provides important insight into how respiratory infections are transmitted and can enhance estimates of exposure risk.

Life Sciences - Health - 24.06.2024
The hippocampus, the cerebral conductor of our daily priorities
The hippocampus, the cerebral conductor of our daily priorities
Scientists from the University of Geneva and the Icahn School of Medicine have shown how a specific region of our brain is activated to prioritise our activities. How does our brain distinguish between urgent and less urgent goals? Researchers at the University of Geneva and the Icahn School of Medicine in New York have explored how our brain remembers and adjusts the goals we set ourselves on a daily basis.
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