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Results 21 - 40 of 270.


Psychology - Social Sciences - 05.06.2024
Sexual minorities experience greater exclusion in everyday situations
Sexual minorities experience greater exclusion in everyday situations
Lesbian, gay and bisexual people experience greater exclusion than heterosexual people. This is the conclusion of a recent study by researchers from the University of Basel and the University of Kaiserslautern-Landau (RPTU). Heterosexual individuals who deviate from traditional gender roles are also affected.

Paleontology - Computer Science - 03.06.2024
Artificial intelligence closes the gaps in the fossil archive
Artificial intelligence closes the gaps in the fossil archive
The patchy fossil record makes it difficult for paleontologists to draw an accurate picture of the extent of past biodiversity and to understand how it has changed over time. A study led by Rebecca Cooper and Daniele Silvestro from the University of Fribourg shows how artificial intelligence (AI) can make this task easier .

Health - Environment - 03.06.2024
Not just a sneeze: Pollen increase blood pressure
An estimated one-fifth of the world's population is affected by pollen allergies. Researchers at Swiss TPH and the University of Basel have now discovered that a high concentration of pollen can increase blood pressure in allergy sufferers. It is estimated that around 20% of adults globally are allergic to pollen.

Health - Pharmacology - 03.06.2024
Antibody-peptide inhibitor conjugates: a new path for cancer therapy
Antibody-peptide inhibitor conjugates: a new path for cancer therapy
Cancer treatments often struggle with balancing efficacy and side effects. A new study by scientists offers a promising solution using antibody-peptide inhibitor conjugates to target specific cell types and block the activity of cancer-promoting enzymes called cathepsins. Tumor cells often hijack normal physiological processes to support their growth, exploiting proteins that are in charge of essential cell functions.

Health - Environment - 31.05.2024
More than sneezing: Pollen increases blood pressure
More than sneezing: Pollen increases blood pressure
An estimated one-fifth of the world's population is affected by pollen allergies. Researchers at Swiss TPH have now discovered that high pollen concentrations can increase blood pressure in allergy sufferers. Pollen allergies are thus becoming a growing public health problem, especially as the pollen season is becoming longer and more intense due to climate change.

Environment - 31.05.2024
Scientists map biodiversity changes in the world's forests
Scientists map biodiversity changes in the world's forests
A group of EPFL and scientists have mapped the biodiversity in forests worldwide. Their data, when combined with climate projections, reveal trends that could support ecosystem conservation and restoration efforts. According to the latest figures from the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, forests cover just over 4 billion hectares of the Earth's surface, or one-third of its total land.

Life Sciences - Health - 30.05.2024
Too much or too little: the impact of protein dosage on development
Too much or too little: the impact of protein dosage on development
A recent study carried out at the University of Lausanne reveals that both excess and deficiency of the same protein can lead to severe intellectual impairment. The discovery opens up vital prospects for the early diagnosis of a rare developmental disorder. A team of scientists led by Alexandre Reymond, an expert in human genetics at the Centre intégratif de génomique (CIG) and Professor at the Faculty of Biology and Medicine (FBM) at the University of Lausanne (UNIL), has produced a major breakthrough in the detection of a rare genetic disease.

History / Archeology - Chemistry - 30.05.2024
Chemists, biologists, archaeologists - who will unearth the recipes of our ancestors?
Chemists, biologists, archaeologists - who will unearth the recipes of our ancestors?
Thanks to a new multidisciplinary approach, a team from the University of Geneva and the CNRS has traced the dietary practices of a Senegalese village. This method will be used for other archaeological digs. Food is more than just a biological need. A veritable marker of culture and identity, it encompasses a wide range of practices that allow us to "read" a region, a country or a social group.

Life Sciences - Health - 30.05.2024
Stem cells boosted with glucose to combat osteoarthritis
Scientists from the University of Geneva have discovered how to increase the lifespan of stem cells injected into cartilage to facilitate the regeneration of tissue damaged by osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis, a degenerative disease of the cartilage that affects the majority of the elderly population, seriously compromises patients' quality of life.

Life Sciences - 29.05.2024
A key protein preserves motor ability during aging
A new study by scientists shows that age-related decline in motor ability can be countered in fruit flies by enhancing the expression of the protein Trio, suggesting potential treatments for age-related movement decline. As we age, we suffer a noticeable decline in motor ability, which affects our quality of life and independence.

Transport - Computer Science - 28.05.2024
Bio-Inspired Cameras and AI Help Drivers Detect Pedestrians and Obstacles Faster
Bio-Inspired Cameras and AI Help Drivers Detect Pedestrians and Obstacles Faster
Artificial intelligence (AI) combined with a novel bio-inspired camera achieves 100 times faster detection of pedestrians and obstacles than current automotive cameras. This important step for computer vision and AI achieved by researchers can greatly improve the safety of automotive systems and self-driving cars.

Innovation - Economics - 28.05.2024
Retail banks: cryptocurrencies on the rise as an investment
Retail banks: cryptocurrencies on the rise as an investment
Despite widespread skepticism, more and more retail banks are offering cryptocurrencies as a fully-fledged asset class. While some banks are specifically building up their own expertise in blockchain, most are relying on third-party providers. These are the findings of a new study by Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts.

Environment - Life Sciences - 27.05.2024
Better archiving of genetic data
Better archiving of genetic data
Every year, researchers upload vast amounts of genetic information to publicly accessible databases.

Social Sciences - Life Sciences - 27.05.2024
Cultural Networks of Central African Hunter-Gatherers Have Ancient Origin
Cultural Networks of Central African Hunter-Gatherers Have Ancient Origin
Extensive social networks between different hunter-gatherer groups in the Congo Basin existed long before agriculture arrived in the region. This continent-wide exchange preserved a cultural diversity that evolved thousands of years ago, as researchers from the University of Zurich show based on musical instruments, specialized vocabulary and genetic information.

Life Sciences - Health - 27.05.2024
Alzheimer’s disease risk: hyperactivation of memory circuits
By exploring the effects of sport on memory, scientists from the University of Geneva have discovered compensatory mechanisms in the brains of young individuals at genetic risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. The benefits of physical activity on health are widely accepted, and those on cognitive capacity are increasingly well known.

Life Sciences - 27.05.2024
How and why different cell division strategies evolve
How and why different cell division strategies evolve
Scientists, in collaboration with researchers at EMBL Heidelberg, have discovered that a group of marine protists (eukaryotic organisms) closely related to animals use open or closed mitosis based on their life cycle stages, suggesting that the way animal cells perform cell division evolved long before animals themselves.

Health - Pharmacology - 23.05.2024
New approach to Epstein-Barr virus and resulting diseases
New approach to Epstein-Barr virus and resulting diseases
The Epstein-Barr virus can cause a spectrum of diseases, including a range of cancers. Emerging data now show that inhibition of a specific metabolic pathway in infected cells can diminish latent infection and therefore the risk of downstream disease, as reported by researchers from the University of Basel and the University Hospital Basel in the journal Science.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 22.05.2024
The double face of fentanyl: the neuronal basis of opioid addiction
The double face of fentanyl: the neuronal basis of opioid addiction
Scientists from the University of Geneva have discovered that fentanyl leads to the activation of two distinct cell populations in the brain, first when the drug is taken and then during withdrawal, suggesting a novel model for opioid addiction. Fentanyl is a particularly powerful synthetic opioid. Diverted from its original medical use, it has become a deadly drug responsible for three-quarters of overdose deaths in the United States.

Health - Pharmacology - 22.05.2024
Gentler cell therapies for blood cancer
Researchers have developed an approach to -deleting- a blood system affected by leukemia while simultaneously building up a new, healthy system with donor blood stem cells. Writing in the journal Nature, the team reports on the promising results obtained in animal experiments and with human cells in the laboratory.

Physics - 22.05.2024
Gamma-ray method monitors nuclear reactors safely and quickly
Gamma-ray method monitors nuclear reactors safely and quickly
Scientists at EPFL have devised and tested out a new, gamma-noise method for monitoring nuclear reactors non-invasively and from a distance. The new method, tested out on EPFL's CROCUS nuclear reactor, can improve nuclear safety and treaty compliance. Monitoring nuclear reactors around the world to ensure that they comply with international treaties is essential for safety.