PSI, Paul Scherrer Institute


PSI, Paul Scherrer Institute   link
Location: Villigen
PSI, Forschungsstrasse 111, 5232 Villigen

Discipline: Physics
Affiliation: Conseil des EPF / ETH Rat

The Paul Scherrer Institute, PSI, is the largest research institute for natural and engineering sciences within Switzerland. We perform world-class research in three main subject areas: Matter and Material; Energy and the Environment; and Human Health. By conducting fundamental and applied research, we work on long-term solutions for major challenges facing society, industry and science.

Physics - Chemistry - Sep 17
Physics - Chemistry
Physicists propose a new path to detect infrared radiation with outstanding sensitivity, allowing detection of signals as low as that of a single quantum of light. When using our webcam or cell phone camera, we experience the tremendous capabilities of cheap and compact sensors developed in the past decades for the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum.
Earth Sciences - Physics - Sep 17
Earth Sciences - Physics

Researchers have used a computer model to test a new hypothesis about the formation of the Alps while simulating seismic activity in Switzerland. This will help improve current earthquake risk models.

Physics - Electroengineering - Sep 7
Physics - Electroengineering

Physicists at the University of Basel have developed a minuscule instrument able to detect extremely faint magnetic fields. At the heart of the superconducting quantum interference device are two atomically thin layers of graphene, which the researchers combined with boron nitride. Instruments like this one have applications in areas such as medicine, besides being used to research new materials.

Astronomy - Physics - Sep 4
Astronomy - Physics

NASA's InSight mission provides data from the surface of Mars. Its seismometer, equipped with electronics built at ETH Zurich, not only records marsquakes, but unexpectedly reacts to solar eclipses as well. When the Martian moon, Phobos moves directly in front of the sun, the instrument tips slightly to one side. This miniscule effect could aid researchers in determining the planet's interior.

Computer Science - Physics - Sep 9
Computer Science - Physics

Using computer simulations powered by machine-learning algorithms EPFL scientists have made an important breakthrough in understanding how hydrogen behaves on Saturn and Jupiter.

Physics - Electroengineering - Sep 7
Physics - Electroengineering

Researchers from EPFL's Photonics Systems Lab have come up with a way of reconfiguring microwave photonic filters without the need for an external device.

Physics - Chemistry - Sep 4
Physics - Chemistry

Researchers, working at the boundary between classical and quantum physics, have developed a method for quickly spotting molecules with particularly interesting electron properties.