Postdoc/Senior Scientist in Skin Ageing (80-100%)

     

Employer

Published11 January 2017
WorkplaceZurich, Zurich region, Switzerland
CategoryLife Sciences
PositionSenior Researcher / Postdoc

Description

The Laboratory for Immunoengineering & Regenerative Medicine, Department of Health Science & Technology at ETH Zurich, is recruiting for its team per 15.2.2017, or by mutual agreement, a

The main task of the candidate will be to elucidate molecular mechanisms of skin ageing, specifically related to a hypoxia as an environmental factor, and the development of new approaches to counteract these processes, with a focus on naturally occurring marine substances. The candidate will conduct in vitro assays on keratinocytes as well as 3D skin models, including (but not limited to) cytotoxicity assays, qPCR, immunoblotting, ELISA and luciferase assays. This 2-year project will be run in close collaboration with two Swiss industrial partners as well as another Swiss academic institution. We offer an intellectually challenging position in the inspiring atmosphere of an interdisciplinary and international team.

A successful candidate will be highly motivated and experienced, with strong communication skills and an interest to work at the interface of basic research and product development. Applicants should have a PhD in Cell or Molecular Biology or related fields and ideally experience in skin biology. Experience in cell culture (cell lines, primary cells, 3D models) and biological assays (qPCR, immunoblotting, ELISA, pathway analysis) is necessary. We furthermore require applicants to have experience in scientific writing and supervision of students. Academic excellence, independence, a professional work attitude, a collaborative mind, leadership potential as well as the motivation to develop and pursue new research ideas, including acquisition of third party funding for such projects, are expected.

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