Life Sciences - Dec 17
Life Sciences
For more than 100 years, biologists have known that cells contain various kinds of membraneless organelles and conjectured what organizing principles underlie them. During the past decade, liquid-liquid phase separation has emerged as one of the concepts that can explain these cellular structures. Phase separation has become an increasingly hot topic, as it can be related to pathologies such as neurodegenerative diseases.
Health - Dec 14
Health

Schistosomiasis is a parasitic worm infection affecting 250 million people globally. The current prevalence thresholds for preventive chemotherapy of schistosomiasis are based on the Kato-Katz method using stool samples.

Life Sciences - Dec 12
Life Sciences

Although wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) remove over 95 per cent of human fecal bacteria, many resistant bacteria can still be detected in the final effluent.

Microtechnics - Dec 12
Microtechnics

A research team from the University of Zurich and EPFL have developed a new drone that can retract its propeller arms in flight and make itself small to fit through narrow gaps and holes.

Pharmacology - Dec 11
Pharmacology

A widely used diabetes medication combined with an antihypertensive drug specifically inhibits tumor growth - this was discovered by researchers from the University of Basel's Biozentrum two years ago.


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Life Sciences - Health - 09:00
How liquid droplets grow in cells
How liquid droplets grow in cells
For more than 100 years, biologists have known that cells contain various kinds of membraneless organelles and conjectured what organizing principles underlie them. During the past decade, liquid-liquid phase separation has emerged as one of the concepts that can explain these cellular structures. Phase separation has become an increasingly hot topic, as it can be related to pathologies such as neurodegenerative diseases.

Health - Pharmacology - 14.12.2018
Modelling for New Schistosomiasis Treatment Thresholds
Modelling for New Schistosomiasis Treatment Thresholds
Schistosomiasis is a parasitic worm infection affecting 250 million people globally. The current prevalence thresholds for preventive chemotherapy of schistosomiasis are based on the Kato-Katz method using stool samples. A new more sensitive point-of-care urine test is now available in particular for settings with low prevalence.

Microtechnics - 12.12.2018
New foldable drone flies through narrow holes in rescue missions
New foldable drone flies through narrow holes in rescue missions
A research team from the University of Zurich and EPFL have developed a new drone that can retract its propeller arms in flight and make itself small to fit through narrow gaps and holes. This is particularly useful when searching for victims of natural disasters. Inspecting a damaged building after an earthquake or during a fire is exactly the kind of job that human rescuers would like drones to do for them.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.12.2018
Enrichment of resistance genes in wastewater treatment plants
Enrichment of resistance genes in wastewater treatment plants
Although wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) remove over 95 per cent of human fecal bacteria, many resistant bacteria can still be detected in the final effluent. How is this to be explained? To find out, a group led by microbiologist Helmut Bürgmann investigated the fate and expression of antibacterial resistance genes in the course of treatment at twelve WWTPs.

Pharmacology - Health - 11.12.2018
Lethal combination: Drug cocktail turns off the juice to cancer cells
Lethal combination: Drug cocktail turns off the juice to cancer cells
A widely used diabetes medication combined with an antihypertensive drug specifically inhibits tumor growth - this was discovered by researchers from the University of Basel's Biozentrum two years ago. In a follow-up study, recently published in "Cell Reports", the scientists report that this drug cocktail induces cancer cell death by switching off their energy supply.

Life Sciences - Physics - 11.12.2018
Using water molecules to unlock neurons' secrets
EPFL researchers have developed a method to observe the electrical activity of neurons by analyzing the behavior of surrounding water molecules. This simple and non-invasive method, which could eliminate the need for electrodes and fluorophores, can be used to monitor the activity within a single neuron or potentially on an entire region of the brain.

Health - Pharmacology - 06.12.2018
Statins Overprescribed for Primary Prevention
Taking cholesterol-lowering drugs, or statins, as a preventive measure can reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. A study by the University of Zurich now shows that this measure is recommended too often, as current guidelines fail to take into account the risks of side effects. Even healthy people who don't suffer from a cardiovascular disease are prescribed cholesterol-lowering drugs, known as statins, if they meet certain risk criteria.

Life Sciences - Health - 05.12.2018
Whole-brain imaging of mice during behavior
In a study published in Neuron, researchers have demonstrated how functional ultrasound imaging can yield high-resolution, unbiased, brain-wide activity maps of behaving mice. These can lead to a brain-wide understanding of how brain activity relates to specific behavior - in healthy mice and in mouse models of neurologic or psychiatric diseases.

Environment - 05.12.2018
Bringing La Buvette d'Evian back to life
Bringing La Buvette d'Evian back to life
In a new book, EPFL researchers trace the history of La Buvette d'Evian - a former lakeside refreshment area that is also an icon of modern architecture. With some light renovation work, La Buvette could reinvigorate the entire region. The book launch will take place on 6 December at EPFL. For over 40 years, tourists and people with kidney ailments came to La Buvette d'Evian for the healing properties of the region's water.

Business / Economics - 04.12.2018
Increasing Crop Insurances Adoption in Developing Countries
Increasing Crop Insurances Adoption in Developing Countries
Farmers in developing countries often rely heavily on their yearly harvest to feed their families. A bad crop can have severe consequences for their livelihood. Despite the significant advantages crop insurances would offer in alleviating this risk, only a small percentage of farmers insure their crops.

Environment - Life Sciences - 03.12.2018
Surprising discovery of pollutants in gammarids
Surprising discovery of pollutants in gammarids
The water in Swiss streams is contaminated with numerous micropollutants. However, very little research has been carried out to determine how these trace substances affect organisms in bodies of water. An Eawag research group has been able to show for the first time on a large scale that such trace substances accumulate in gammarids and possibly have a negative effect on them.

Physics - 03.12.2018
LHC prepares for new achievements
LHC prepares for new achievements
Geneva, 3 December 2018. Early this morning, operators of the CERN Control Centre turned off the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), ending the very successful second run of the world's most powerful particle accelerator. CERN's accelerator complex will be stopped for about two years to enable major upgrade and renovation works.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 29.11.2018
The polar regions communicate via postcards and text messages
The polar regions communicate via postcards and text messages
A new study found two types of climatic connection between the North Atlantic and Antarctica. One is a rapid atmospheric channel and the other a much slower connection through the ocean. During the last glacial period, these links resulted in abrupt climatic changes - and could so again in future. In a study just published in the journal "Nature", an international team of researchers describes how an ocean current repeatedly strengthening and weakening again 60,000 to 12,000 years ago led to an extremely sudden change in the climate.

Environment - Innovation / Technology - 29.11.2018
Connected urban planners can better serve city residents
Connected urban planners can better serve city residents
By comparing the cities of Geneva and Singapore, a thesis found that urban planners can reap multiple benefits by better leveraging digital technology.

Health - Pharmacology - 28.11.2018
New Stem-Cell Therapy to Improve Fight against Leukemia
Stem-cell transplantation is an effective form of therapy to fight leukemia. In many cases, however, the transferred immune cells of the donor also attack the recipients' healthy tissue ' often with fatal consequences. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now identified a molecule that plays a key role in this process.

Life Sciences - 28.11.2018
First Digital 3D Brain Cell Atlas
First Digital 3D Brain Cell Atlas
Like "going from hand-drawn maps to Google Earth," the Blue Brain Cell Atlas allows anyone to visualize every region in the mouse brain, cell-by-cell - and freely download data for new analyses and modelling. The first digital 3D atlas of every cell in the mouse brain provides neuroscientists with previously unavailable information on major cell types, numbers and positions in all 737 brain regions - which will potentially accelerate progress in brain science massively.

Veterinary Science - Life Sciences - 26.11.2018
Cribbing Horses Can also Solve Complex Tasks
Cribbing Horses Can also Solve Complex Tasks
A study conducted by Agroscope's Swiss National Stud Farm (SNSF) in collaboration with the University of Neuchâtel refuted the assumption that cribbing horses perform less well in complicated learning situations than other horses. All horses in the study were able to recognise symbols as well as solve inverse conclusion exercises, which are difficult for horses.

History / Archeology - Environment - 26.11.2018
Even the ancient Romans were polluters
Even the ancient Romans were polluters
"We are polluting the rivers and the natural elements, and even ruining the very thing that is essential to life - the air." These words were not spoken by nature conservationists in the 21st century but flowed from the pen of the Roman scholar Pliny the Elder. In fact ancient history researchers agree today that even in Roman times the environment was being polluted - by unfiltered wastewater, the mining of metals such as iron or lead and clear-cutting of the forests.

Earth Sciences - 22.11.2018
How we can get more out of our forests
How we can get more out of our forests
Most European forests are primarily used for timber production. However, woodlands also offer spaces for recreation and they store carbon but it is not clear how forests can be managed for these multiple benefits. A new study under the direction of the University of Bern is now showing how forestry can be improved so that wooded areas can fulfill as many services as possible.

Computer Science / Telecom - Veterinary Science - 21.11.2018
A hydrogel that adheres firmly to cartilage and meniscus
EPFL researchers have developed a hydrogel - made up of nearly 90% water - that naturally adheres to soft tissue like cartilage and the meniscus. If the hydrogel carries repair cells, it could help damaged tissue to heal. Some types of body tissue, like cartilage and meniscus, have little or no blood supply and are unable to heal if damaged.
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