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Health - Pharmacology - 11.04.2019
The way people walk says a lot about how healthy they are
The way people walk says a lot about how healthy they are
Gait characteristics are sometimes regarded as the sixth vital sign in humans. They serve as a valuable indicator of a person's health, particularly in older adults - so why not measure them? A team of EPFL researchers is taking part in a major European project to design a device that can assess a person's gait more accurately.

Astronomy / Space Science - 10.04.2019
First image of a black hole
First image of a black hole
The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) - a planet-scale array of eight ground-based radio telescopes forged through international collaboration - was designed to capture images of a black hole. Today, in coordinated press conferences across the globe, EHT researchers reveal that they have succeeded, unveiling the first direct visual evidence of a supermassive black hole and its shadow.

Environment - 09.04.2019
The oldest ice on Earth may be able to solve the puzzle of the planet's climate history
The oldest ice on Earth may be able to solve the puzzle of the planet’s climate history
A European research consortium, in which the University of Bern is involved in, wants to drill a 1.5 million year old ice core in Antarctica. An analysis of the climate data stored in the ice should contribute to a better understanding of the alternation between warm and cold periods. As part of the EU project "Beyond EPICA - Oldest Ice", experts from 14 institutions located in 10 European countries have spent three years combing the Antarctic ice sheet to find the ideal location to retrieve the oldest ice core on the Earth.

Earth Sciences - 08.04.2019
Melting Glaciers Causing Sea Levels to Rise at Ever Greater Rates
Melting Glaciers Causing Sea Levels to Rise at Ever Greater Rates
Melting ice sheets in Greenland and the Antarctic as well as ice melt from glaciers all over the world are causing sea levels to rise. Glaciers alone lost more than 9,000 billion tons of ice since 1961, raising water levels by 27 millimeters, an international research team under the lead of UZH have now found.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 08.04.2019
New biologically derived metal-organic framework mimics DNA
New biologically derived metal-organic framework mimics DNA
Chemical engineers at EPFL have synthesized a biologically-derived metal-organic framework on which the hydrogen bonding that forms the DNA double helix can be mimicked and studied like never before.

Life Sciences - Health - 08.04.2019
Deep Brain Stimulation Against Movement and Psychiatric Disorders
Deep Brain Stimulation Against Movement and Psychiatric Disorders
A new paper published suggests that recent advances in deep brain stimulation (DBS) for Parkinson disease could lead to treatments for conditions such as obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), Gilles de la Tourette syndrome and depression. The authors of the paper argue that bi-directional electrodes, which can both stimulate and record from deep brain structures - known as closed-loop DBS, could have applications beyond Parkinson disease.

Physics - 04.04.2019
Detecting pollution with a compact laser source
Detecting pollution with a compact laser source
Researchers at EPFL have developed a simple mid-infrared laser source that can be used to detect pollution in the air or molecules in someone's breath. Their system takes up considerably less space than the large ones typically used for such tasks. Researchers at EPFL have come up with a new middle infrared light source that can detect greenhouse and other gases, as well as molecules in a person's breath.

Life Sciences - 03.04.2019
How understanding animal behavior can support wildlife conservation
How understanding animal behavior can support wildlife conservation
Researchers from EPFL and the University of Zurich have developed a model that uses data from sensors worn by meerkats to gain a more detailed picture of how animals behave in the wild. Advancement in sensor technologies has meant that field biologists are now collecting a growing mass of ever more precise data on animal behaviour.

Innovation / Technology - Pharmacology - 02.04.2019
Nestlé Health Science set to use anti-aging compound
Amazentis, an EPFL spin-off based in Innovation Park, announced today that it is entering into a strategic partnership with Nestlé Health Science. The startup plans to develop products based on urolithin A, a promising anti-aging compound. The Fountain of Youth is still the stuff of legend, but the anti-aging compound urolithin A is now one step closer to the market.

Materials Science - Environment - 02.04.2019
Rotten to the core
Rotten to the core
Fungi that decompose tree trunks can conjure up real works of art in wood. In nature, however, the decay-causing fungi not only decorate the tree, but also destroy it. Empa researchers are now teaching the fungi how to draw. The result: upscale marbled wood that can be processed into design furniture or musical instruments.

Environment - Life Sciences - 02.04.2019
Excessive levels of plant protection products in small streams
Excessive levels of plant protection products in small streams
Between March and October 2017, samples collected from five small streams with catchment areas subject to a variety of agricultural uses were analysed for plant protection products. The Eawag and Ecotox Centre scientists were assisted by five cantons and the Water Quality Platform of the Swiss Water Association (VSA).

Physics - Health - 02.04.2019
Harnessing photonics for at-home disease detection
Harnessing photonics for at-home disease detection
With nothing more than a photonic chip and an ordinary camera, EPFL researchers have managed to count biomolecules one by one in a small sample and determine their position. Their tiny device - a marriage of optics and smart image analysis - is even able to detect a graphene sheet only a single atom thick.

Environment - 01.04.2019
Climate Change Threat to Dolphins' Survival
Climate Change Threat to Dolphins’ Survival
An unprecedented marine heatwave had long-lasting negative impacts on both survival and birth rates on the iconic dolphin population in Shark Bay, Western Australia. Researchers at UZH have now documented that climate change may have more far-reaching consequences for the conservation of marine mammals than previously thought.

Chemistry - Physics - 01.04.2019

Physics - Chemistry - 29.03.2019
A compass pointing West
A compass pointing West
Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI and ETH Zurich have discovered a special phenomenon of magnetism in the nano range. It enables magnets to be assembled in unusual configurations. This could be used to build computer memories and switches to increase the performance of microprocessors. The results of the work have now been published in the journal Science .

Health - Life Sciences - 28.03.2019
Crime Scene Schizophrenia - 30 Genes under suspicion
Crime Scene Schizophrenia - 30 Genes under suspicion
A research group has identified 30 genes associated with schizophrenia. The team was able to show which pathological changes in the brain and behavioral abnormalities are triggered by these genes. The results of the study have now been published in "Cell". The research team of the Biozentrum, University of Basel investigated a total of 132 genes associated with schizophrenia.

Health - Pharmacology - 28.03.2019
Breast cancer: the promises of old recipes
Breast cancer: the promises of old recipes
Researchers from UNIGE and UNIL demonstrate the efficacy of a well-known antibiotic in treating a particularly fatal form of breast cancer, offering hope for targeted therapy. Of the three major subtypes of breast cancer, the «triple negative» is the most lethal: half of all breast cancer deaths are attributed to it, whereas it accounts for only about 15% of incidences of breast cancer.

Life Sciences - 27.03.2019
Lying, Sitting or Standing: Resting Postures Determined by Animals' Size
Lying, Sitting or Standing: Resting Postures Determined by Animals’ Size
Cows always lie on their chests so that their digestion is not impaired. Rodents sometimes rest sitting down, while kangaroos sometimes lie on their backs. The larger the animal, the less often it lies down, and when it does, it is more likely to lie on its side - but there are exceptions. A team from UZH investigated the resting postures of mammals.

Life Sciences - Mathematics - 27.03.2019
An old neuroscience problem
An old neuroscience problem
Researchers from EPFL explain how the shapes of neurons can be classified using mathematical methods from the field of algebraic topology. Neuroscientists can now start building a formal catalogue for all the types of cells in the brain. Onto this catalogue of cells, they can systematically map the function and role in disease of each type of neuron in the brain.
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