news from the lab 2012

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Medicine/Pharmacology



Results 1 - 14 of 14.

Earth Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
20.11.2012
Analyzing Lake Geneva from the air
Analyzing Lake Geneva from the air
One year after the MIR submersibles dove into the depths of Lake Geneva, the elemo program is delivering its first scientific results. The operation will be extended with a campaign to make observations above the lake surface from a sensor-packed ultralight aircraft. The same experiments are planned above Lake Baikal in Russia.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
02.11.2012
A new method for early cancer detection
A new method for early cancer detection
It may soon be possible to test a person for cancer with just a drop of their blood and a small machine. Scientists have developed a device for detecting the HSP70 protein, which is over-expressed in patients with many types of cancer. The objective: to make a diagnosis extremely early in the disease process, thereby improving outcomes for patients.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Physics/Materials Science
17.10.2012
New Technique to Diagnose Hearing Loss
New Technique to Diagnose Hearing Loss
Researchers have developed an imaging technique that can provide in situ observations of the internal ear, an area which has until now been inaccessible. This groundbreaking work may finally make it possible to understand the mechanisms underlying hearing loss. What actually causes hearing loss in humans? And what are the best therapeutic approaches to this problem? Modern medicine hasn't yet been able to provide doctors with the right answers in many cases, because there has been no way to observe the tissue of the inner ear, without destroying it.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Chemistry
19.09.2012
1950s antibiotic to combat drug resistance
1950s antibiotic to combat drug resistance
EPFL researchers have opened the door to a new strategy to fight tuberculosis, the second leading cause of death from infectious disease after HIV. In a study published in EMBO Molecular Medicine on September 17th, EPFL professor Stewart Cole takes a hard look at the natural product pyridomycin, first reported in the 1950s, and determines exactly how it kills Mycobacterium tuberculosis.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
31.08.2012
Genetic observation reveals a bone-weakening mechanism
Genetic observation reveals a bone-weakening mechanism
A research team has used a novel method to identify a gene involved in bone building. "Real life genetics" works. This research method involves observing physiological traits or metabolic disease in a large population of "wild-type" mice (those which have not been genetically modified), and then isolating the genes that could be responsible.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
05.07.2012
Demystifying the immortality of cancer cells
Demystifying the immortality of cancer cells
In cancer cells, normal mechanisms governing the cellular life cycle have gone haywire. Cancer cells continue to divide indefinitely, without ever dying off, thus creating rapidly growing tumors.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
31.05.2012
Walking Again After Spinal Cord Injury
Walking Again After Spinal Cord Injury
Scientists wake up a dormant spinal column and restore voluntary lower body movement when stimulated. Rats with spinal cord injuries and severe paralysis are now walking (and running) thanks to researchers at EPFL. Published in the June 1, 2012 issue of Science, the results show that a severed section of the spinal cord can make a comeback when its own innate intelligence and regenerative capacity is awakened.
Microtechnics/Electroengineering - Medicine/Pharmacology
04.05.2012
A Robot for Spinal Column Operations
A Robot for Spinal Column Operations
With less than a 0.5 mm margin of error, Neuroglide, the robot developed by researchers allows for the placement of screws in small vertebrae with unequaled precision.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Business/Economics
01.05.2012
Actelion ensures his future with Macitentan
Actelion ensures his future with Macitentan
Actelion announced today that initial analysis indicates that the pivotal, long-term, event-driven study SERAPHIN with macitentan, a novel dual endothelin receptor antagonist, in 742 patients sufferi
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
10.04.2012
Lethal weapon used by viruses
Lethal weapon used by viruses
It could be the tiniest armor-piercing weapon in the biological universe: Scientists have measured a one-nanometer needle-like tip that viruses use to attack bacteria. Grouped together under the unassuming name φ92, a family of bacteriophage viruses has perfected its specialty: they attack salmonella and coliform bacteria.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
19.03.2012
Understanding the propagation of Alzheimer's Disease
Understanding the propagation of Alzheimer’s Disease
The connections between neurons might play a role in neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's Disease (AD). In a pioneering approach to studying how neurodegenerative diseases like AD spread within the brain, researchers have developed a novel in vitro experimental method that allows them to connect healthy neurons with “infected” neurons and then observe the results.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
09.03.2012
Chemical Biology of Parkinson's disease
Chemical Biology of Parkinson’s disease
Elucidating the role of C-terminal post-translational modifications using protein semisynthesis strategies: α-synuclein phosphorylation at tyrosine 125.
Medicine/Pharmacology
05.03.2012
New point of attack for breast cancer
New point of attack for breast cancer
Scientists describe how the protein phosphatase SHP2 promotes breast cancer with poor prognosis. SHP2 is necessary for the maintenance of the few tumor initiating cells (TICs) in a breast tumor.
Medicine/Pharmacology
30.01.2012
Protective covering for implants
Protective covering for implants
A new technology could prevent most breast implant rejections. So far, more than a quarter of all breast implants must be removed within four years, because neighboring tissues develop a rigid envelope of fibrous tissue to protect themselves from the foreign body. A company has developed a protective covering made up of a nanostructured surface and a layer of collagen that will prevent the body from rejecting the implant.

 
 
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