news from the lab 2014

Life Sciences - Oct 16
Life Sciences
House mice carrying a specific selfish supergene move from one population to another much more frequently than their peers. This finding of a study shows for the first time that a gene of this type can influence animal migratory behavior. It could help in dealing with invasive plagues of mice. Usually the cooperation of genes helps an organism to grow and flourish.
Computer Science - Oct 16
Computer Science

Researchers have carried out a study using smartphone data from young Swiss people to better understand the circumstances in which they are most likely to drink.

Medicine - Oct 15

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Computer Science - Oct 15

Scientists from EPFL and ETH Zurich have developed an ultra-light glove - weighing less than 8 grams per finger- that enables users to feel and manipulate virtual objects.

Environment - Oct 15
Environment

Global trade is saving water on balance. In principle, this is a good thing. However, the water budget has its dark side - a fact which Eawag researchers have now brought to light.


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Results 1 - 19 of 19.


Social Sciences - Life Sciences - 25.12.2014
Fruit flies respond more effectively to danger when in a group
Fruit flies respond more effectively to danger when in a group
Fruit flies respond more effectively to danger when in a group. A research team discovered this behavior as well as the neural circuits which relay this information, opening a new field of research.

Life Sciences - Physics / Materials Science - 19.12.2014
Unraveling the light of fireflies
Unraveling the light of fireflies
How do fireflies produce those mesmerizing light flashes? Using cuttingedge imaging techniques, scientists from Switzerland and Taiwan have unraveled the firefly's intricate light-producing system for the first time. Fireflies used rapid light flashes to communicate. This "bioluminescence" is an intriguing phenomenon that has many potential applications, from drug testing and monitoring water contamination, and even lighting up streets using glow-in-dark trees and plants.

Physics / Materials Science - 19.11.2014

Electroengineering - Physics / Materials Science - 12.10.2014
Useful for spintronics: Big surprises in a thin surface region
Useful for spintronics: Big surprises in a thin surface region
The need for ever faster and more efficient electronic devices is growing rapidly, and thus the demand for new materials with new properties. Oxides, especially ones based on strontium titanate (SrTiO 3 ), play an important role here. Researchers recently discovered that SrTiO 3 , although actually an insulator, can form a metallic layer on its surface, in which electric current can flow.

Physics / Materials Science - Astronomy / Space Science - 18.09.2014
New territories in the flux of cosmic rays
New territories in the flux of cosmic rays
The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS ) collaboration has today presented its latest results. These are based on the analysis of 41 billion particles detected with the space-based AMS detector aboard the International Space Station. The results, presented during a seminar at CERN 2 , provide new insights into the nature of the mysterious excess of positrons observed in the flux of cosmic rays.

Business / Economics - Medicine / Pharmacology - 26.08.2014
Roche acquires InterMune
Roche acquires InterMune
After dementing the romours that Roche would buy all the outstanding shares of Chugai it does not yet own, the pharma giant has after all been involved in some mergers and acquisitions activity with a $8.3 billion offer in cash for InterMune.

Life Sciences - Medicine / Pharmacology - 17.07.2014
Mechanism of action of thalidomide elucidated
Mechanism of action of thalidomide elucidated
Scientists have clarified the workings of thalidomide at the molecular level. Their analysis of various structures indicates that the drug can interfere with cellular processes in two different ways-once preventing and once promoting protein degradation-thus explaining its diverse clinical effects. In the early 1960s, thalidomide - a drug widely prescribed at that time as a sedative and for the treatment of morning sickness in pregnancy - became notorious when it was found to cause birth defects.

Physics / Materials Science - 15.07.2014
Smallest Swiss Cross – Made of 20 Single Atoms
Smallest Swiss Cross – Made of 20 Single Atoms
The manipulation of atoms has reached a new level: Physicists were able to place 20 single atoms on a fully insulated surface at room temperature to form the smallest “Swiss cross”, thus taking a big step towards next generation atomic-scale storage devices. Ever since the 1990s, physicists have been able to directly control surface structures by moving and positioning single atoms to certain atomic sites.

Life Sciences - Medicine / Pharmacology - 04.07.2014
Inducing visual function
Inducing visual function
Scientists have resolved the mechanism controlling the maintenance of the light detectors - the cone photoreceptor outer segments - in the retina. With this knowledge, they have been able to induce the formation of functional photoreceptors in cultured retinas derived from embryonic stem cells. This opens up exciting new avenues for the study and treatment of blindness.

Physics / Materials Science - 22.06.2014
CERN experiments report new Higgs boson measurements
CERN experiments report new Higgs boson measurements
The CMS experiment at CERN reports new results on an important property of the Higgs particle, whose discovery was announced by the ATLAS and CMS experiments on 4 July 2012. The CMS result follows preliminary results from both experiments, which both reported strong evidence for the fermionic decay late in 2013.

Medicine / Pharmacology - 19.05.2014
Our brain is flexible and adaptable
Our brain is flexible and adaptable
The brains of bilingual people do not differ in their structure, but are capable of developing differentiated strategies according to the demands placed on them by particular contexts.

Chemistry - 16.05.2014
Detaching glue with light: possible thanks to a supramolecular adhesive
Detaching glue with light: possible thanks to a supramolecular adhesive
Something went wrong when gluing something? No problem. Researchers have developed a polymer structure which is capable of reversibly gluing materials together using nothing but light.

Physics / Materials Science - 16.05.2014
Experiment sheds new light on cloud formation
Experiment sheds new light on cloud formation
CERN 's CLOUD experiment has shown that biogenic vapours emitted by trees and oxidised in the atmosphere have a significant impact on the formation of clouds, thus helping to cool the planet. These biogenic aerosols are what give forests seen from afar their characteristic blue haze. The CLOUD study shows that the oxidised biogenic vapours bind with sulphuric acid to form embryonic particles which can then grow to become the seeds on which cloud droplets can form.

Mechanical Engineering - Life Sciences - 10.04.2014
A brain area responsible for grasping
A brain area responsible for grasping
A research has shown that limb motor control is regulated by a selective synaptic connectivity matrix between the brainstem and the spinal cord. In particular, the researchers have pinpointed a brainstem area responsible for the control of grasping. This is the first time it has been possible to link defined neuronal circuit elements unequivocally to a specific phase of movement.

Mechanical Engineering - 25.03.2014
X-rays film inside live flying insects – in 3D
X-rays film inside live flying insects – in 3D
Scientists have used a particle accelerator to obtain high-speed 3D X-ray visualizations of the flight muscles of flies. The team developed a groundbreaking new CT scanning technique at the PSI's Swiss Light Source to allow them to film inside live flying insects. 3D movies of the blowfly flight motor offer a glimpse into the inner workings of one of nature's most complex mechanisms, showing that structural deformations are the key to understanding how a fly controls its wingbeat.

Electroengineering - Physics / Materials Science - 06.03.2014
Observed live with x-ray laser: electricity controls magnetism
Observed live with x-ray laser: electricity controls magnetism
Data on a hard drive is stored by flipping small magnetic domains. Researchers have now changed the magnetic arrangement in a material much faster than is possible with today's hard drives. The researchers used a new technique where an electric field triggers these changes, in contrast to the magnetic fields commonly used in consumer devices.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Chemistry - 13.02.2014
When chemists invent new rattles
When chemists invent new rattles
Chemists have developed a one-pot synthesis process to encapsulate nanoparticles. This type of particle could improve the antimicrobial coating of implants.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 04.02.2014
A software to identify genetic mutations
A software to identify genetic mutations
A research team developed a computer programme to identify mutations causing certain genetic diseases by analysing the genome sequencing data. The software can also detect the mutations leading to the appearance of tumours in patients with cancer. It is available to researchers all over the world.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 17.01.2014
A rhythm for development
A rhythm for development
Development of the nematode C. elegans is directed by rhythmic patterns of protein production. As researchers have shown, oscillations with an 8-hour period occur across a wide variety of tissues, structures, cells and genes. The extent of the phenomenon suggests that the process involved could be a fundamental mechanism in the development of many organisms .