news from the lab 2015


Category


Years
2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008


Results 41 - 60 of 106.

Earth Sciences - Civil Engineering/Traffic Engineering
06.11.2015
Thin walls with potentially fatal consequences
Thin walls with potentially fatal consequences
06.11.15 - Given the choice between safer and cheaper construction, many housing design companies in earthquake-prone developing countries see themselves forced to save on expensive construction materials and opt for the latter. EPFL structural engineers have gathered new data on how these structures respond to earthquakes, and in which circumstances they may fail.
Life Sciences
05.11.2015
Faster digestion in kangaroos reduces methane emissions
Faster digestion in kangaroos reduces methane emissions
Why does a kangaroo expel less methane than a cow? Researchers from the University of Zurich and Australia decide to investigate - and discovered that the emission of this climate-damaging gas in kangaroos is linked to how long food is digested. Animals produce methane during the digestion process - some more than others.
Computer Science/Telecom - History/Archeology
02.11.2015
Revealing the mysteries of the Maya script
Revealing the mysteries of the Maya script
02.11.15 - EPFL researchers have come up with an algorithm to analyze Mayan writing. This project could one day contribute to translating this complex and still partially unknown language. While some five million people still speak a language that evolved out of Mayan civilization in South America, the written language has suffered a different fate.
Physics/Materials Science
02.11.2015
Increasing vitamin D supplementation
Increasing vitamin D supplementation
Elderly women should take in more vitamin D than previously recommended during the winter months. Osteoporosis is one of the chief reasons why the elderly often suffer broken bones from relatively minor injuries.
Arts and Design
31.10.2015
Lines that blur reality
Lines that blur reality
ETH Zurich's Collection of Prints and Drawings is currently exhibiting drawings from the 1950s that were discovered in Andy Warhol's estate. These early works reveal unexpected sides of the famous artist, providing a glimpse into his unique approach, the so-called "blotted line" technique. The discovery, reported in 2011, was sensational: a Munich-based art dealer discovered 400 previously unknown drawings among the remaining works in Andy Warhol's estate.
Astronomy - Chemistry
28.10.2015
Surprising Discovery of Oxygen in Comet
Surprising Discovery of Oxygen in Comet
The biggest surprise so far in the chemical analysis of Comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko's atmosphere is the high proportion of oxygen molecules. While such molecules are common in the earth's atmosphere, their presence on comets had originally been ruled out. Early on in the mission of the ROSINA mass spectrometer, in September of last year, researchers from the Center for Space and Habitability (CSH) at the University of Bern made an unexpected discovery when analyzing the comet's gases: Between the expected peak values of sulfur and methanol, clear traces of oxygen (O2) molecules were detected.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
27.10.2015
Intestinal worms
Intestinal worms "talk" to gut bacteria to boost the immune system
27.10.15 - EPFL researchers have discovered how intestinal worm infections cross-talk with gut bacteria to help the immune system. Intestinal worms infect over 2 billion people across the world, mostly children, in areas with poor sanitation. But despite causing serious health problems, worms can actually help the immune system of its host as an indirect way of protecting themselves.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
26.10.2015
An innovative response to the challenge of storing renewable energy
An innovative response to the challenge of storing renewable energy
26.10.15 - A system for managing and storing energy, developed by EPFL's Distributed Electrical Systems Laboratory, has been inaugurated on the school's campus.
Life Sciences - Pedagogy/Education Science
26.10.2015
Siberian jays can recognize unfamiliar, distant relatives
Siberian jays can recognize unfamiliar, distant relatives
Can animals recognize distantly related, unfamiliar individuals of the same species? Siberian jays possess this ability as evolutionary biologists from the University of Zurich recently could demonstrate for the first time. This bird species belongs to the crow family and is able to accurately assess the degree of kinship to unfamiliar individuals.
Computer Science/Telecom - Event
26.10.2015
One click away from the perfect outfit
One click away from the perfect outfit
Whether shopping online or offline, everyone knows how difficult it can be to find the right outfit. Fashwell, an ETH spin-off, now has a remedy for that. Its app unites social media and online shopping to help users track down the clothes they like. Anyone who thinks fashion and computer science are two irreconcilable concepts and that fashion is inherently out of place in a technical course would quickly change their opinion with a single visit to the ETH spin-off Fashwell.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Physics/Materials Science
23.10.2015
Monitoring critical blood levels in real time in the ICU
Monitoring critical blood levels in real time in the ICU
23.10.15 - For patients in intensive care, knowing how much glucose, lactate and other substances are in the blood is a question of life or death. EPFL has developed a miniaturized microfluidic device that will allow medical staff to monitor these levels in real time and react more quickly.
Chemistry - Medicine/Pharmacology
23.10.2015
Potato harvest reduced by half
Potato harvest reduced by half
On the way from field to fork, more than half of the potato harvest is lost. This is according to a new study conducted by researchers from Agroscope and ETH Zurich.
Astronomy - Physics/Materials Science
22.10.2015
Looking at the earliest galaxies
Looking at the earliest galaxies
22.10.15 - An international team of astronomers led by EPFL have discovered over 250 of the universe's earliest galaxies. This sample includes the faintest and smallest of the first-generation dwarf galaxies to be discovered, and offers important clues about the nature of the early universe.
Mechanical Engineering/Mechanics
22.10.2015
The ductility of magnesium explained
The ductility of magnesium explained
22.10.15 - Zhaoxuan Wu and William Curtin of the Laboratory for Multiscale Mechanics Modeling (LAMMM) have solved the 40-year-old scientific riddle of the low ductility magnesium. Magnesium is the lightest metal found on earth; it is four times lighter than steel and a third lighter than aluminum.
Life Sciences
21.10.2015
How the brain triggers action
How the brain triggers action
21.10.15 - EPFL scientists have identified specific neurons in the striatum that contribute to driving motivated behaviors like movement. The work may help in designing new ways of treating disorders like Parkinson's disease in the long term. Perhaps the brain's most important function is to process sensory information and make behavioral decisions based on it, like moving to grasp an object.
Life Sciences - Environment/Sustainable Development
16.10.2015
The future of farming depends on local breeds
The future of farming depends on local breeds
16.10.15 - The dwindling genetic diversity of farm animals is increasingly becoming a threat to livestock production.
Medicine/Pharmacology
15.10.2015
Fighting age-related health impairments with mind and body
Fighting age-related health impairments with mind and body
In promoting mental health, combined mental and physical training is more effective than physical training alone, as ETH human movement scientists have shown in a study of people over 70. Age-related health impairments affect not just the body but also the mind. Scientists refer to its mental symptoms as "mild cognitive impairment" (MCI): sufferers misplace things, can't recall the name of the neighbour they've just been talking to, or become generally less responsive.
Life Sciences - Physics/Materials Science
14.10.2015
3D Structure of a Protein Complex Important for Immune Response
3D Structure of a Protein Complex Important for Immune Response
Our innate immune system rapidly eliminates invading pathogens. When a pathogen is detected in the body, the "inflammasome" protein complex initiates the defense response of the immune cells. By combining two high-resolution methods, researchers from the University of Basel's Biozentrum have now determined the atomic structure of an important part of the inflammasome.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
14.10.2015
Looking at the brain with a geologist's
Looking at the brain with a geologist's "eye"
14.10.15 - Using a geologist's imaging tool, researchers have made unprecedented high-resolution images of how carbon atoms from glucose are integrated into brain cells, providing new insight and opening new doors into the fate of glucose in the brain. Glucose - a form of sugar - fuels the brain.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
12.10.2015
Genetic variation is key to fighting viruses
Genetic variation is key to fighting viruses
12.10.15 - Using a genome-wide association study, EPFL scientists have identified subtle genetic changes that can cause substantial differences to how we fight viral infections. When infected with a virus, the response of our immune systems varies widely from person to person. This variation is of great concern, as these differences can determine clinical outcome as well as effectiveness of vaccinations.

 
 
Jobs on