news from the lab 2015

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Electroengineering



Results 1 - 4 of 4.


Earth Sciences - Electroengineering - 11.12.2015
Upside-down lightning strikes
Upside-down lightning strikes
11.12.15 - Upward lightning strikes initiate on the ground and head skyward. These discharges, which usually begin at the top of tall and slender structures, pose a real risk for wind turbines.

Electroengineering - 10.11.2015
Going back in time to locate short circuits in power grids
Going back in time to locate short circuits in power grids
10.11.15 - EPFL researchers have come up with a method to determine the exact location of short circuits in a power grid. This is an important step towards operating complex power grid topologies that enable the massive integration of renewable energy resources. When a high-voltage power line is damaged by wind, ice or a tree, electricity utilities must quickly find the fault location and repair it to meet the power quality requirements or avoid cascade blackout.

Physics - Electroengineering - 21.09.2015
Tiny magnets mimic steam, water and ice
Tiny magnets mimic steam, water and ice
Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) created a synthetic material out of 1 billion tiny magnets. Astonishingly, it now appears that the magnetic properties of this so-called metamaterial change with the temperature, so that it can take on different states; just like water has a gaseous, liquid and a solid state.

Electroengineering - 28.01.2015
Electronic circuits with reconfigurable pathways closer to reality
Electronic circuits with reconfigurable pathways closer to reality
Multitasking circuits capable of reconfiguring themselves in real time and switching functions as the need arises - this is the promising application stemming from a discovery made at EPFL and published. Other potential uses: miniaturising our electronic devices and developing resilient circuits. Will it be possible one day to reconfigure electronic microchips however we want, even when they are in use? A recent discovery by a team at EPFL suggests as much.