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Health - Life Sciences - 21.12.2015
Eyes turn into skin: how inflammation can change the fate of cells
Eyes turn into skin: how inflammation can change the fate of cells
21.12.15 - EPFL scientists have found that chronic inflammation can cause regenerating cells to grow into new, aberrant types; this is called metaplasia, and is a disorder linked to prolonged inflammation. The study highlights a new concept of chronic inflammation and could lead to better treatments.

Life Sciences - Health - 18.12.2015
Scientists predict activity of human genes
Scientists predict activity of human genes
Genetically identical sibling cells do not always behave the same way. So far this has been attributed to random molecular reactions. Now systems biologists of the University of Zurich have discovered an overlooked consequence of the spatial separation of cells into a nucleus and a cytoplasm. Building on top of this insight they could predict with supercomputers the activity of genes in individual human cells.

Life Sciences - Health - 18.12.2015
Architecture of mTOR protein complex solved
Architecture of mTOR protein complex solved
It has long been known that the protein TOR - Target of Rapamycin - controls cell growth and is involved in the development of diseases such as cancer and diabetes. Through a collaborative effort scientists from the ETH Zürich and from the Biozentrum of the University of Basel have now succeeded in revealing the unique architecture of the mammalian TOR complex 1 (mTORC1) in detail.

Health - Life Sciences - 15.12.2015
Treating colon cancer with vitamin A
Treating colon cancer with vitamin A
15.12.15 - Scientists at EPFL identify the biological pathway behind the growth of colon cancer, and block it with vitamin A. A leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide, colon cancer is famously resistant to treatment. There are many reasons for this, but one has to do with a group of persisting cancer cells in the colon that cause relapses.

Health - Pharmacology - 09.12.2015
Using
Using "big data" to fight flu
Thanks to "big data", researchers have identified new molecules that are instrumental in the replication of the flu virus. If these host proteins are blocked, influenza viruses are unable to multiply as effectively. The international study therefore makes a significant contribution towards the development of new treatments and flu drugs.

Health - Innovation - 09.12.2015
Out now: A microscope that sees live cells in 3D
Out now: A microscope that sees live cells in 3D
EPFL spin-off Nanolive has launched the 3D Cell Explorer, a microscope for observing living cells in 3D.

Health - Life Sciences - 01.12.2015
Genes for a longer, healthier life found
Genes for a longer, healthier life found
Out of a 'haystack' of 40,000 genes from three different organisms, scientists at ETH Zurich and a research consortium in Jena have found genes that are involved in physical ageing. If you influence only one of these genes, the healthy lifespan of laboratory animals is extended - and possibly that of humans, too.

Life Sciences - Health - 24.11.2015
Bacterial Nanomachine Serves as a Versatile Tool
Bacterial Nanomachine Serves as a Versatile Tool
The team from the startup company "T3 Pharmaceuticals" at the Biozentrum of the University of Basel has developed a fast and simple technique that can provide valuable insights into important life processes and which can be applied for therapeutic purposes. In the recent issue of the "Journal of Cell Biology", the young entrepreneurs describe a bacterial nanomachine that they implement as a tool to selectively inject diverse proteins into cells.

Health - 13.11.2015
Gaming Against Heart Disease in Diabetic Patients
Gaming Against Heart Disease in Diabetic Patients
Exercise is healthy - this applies to all of us, especially though for people suffering from type 2 diabetes. Researchers from the University of Basel were able to show that fitness games, or "exergames", for the Nintendo Wii console are suitable to increase cardiorespiratory fitness in type 2 diabetic patients and thus lower the risk of related heart disease.

Health - Environment - 11.11.2015
Tackling a neglected disease with math
Tackling a neglected disease with math
11.11.15 - Schistosomiasis is a parasitic disease that is endemic in sub-Saharan Africa.

Pharmacology - Health - 06.11.2015
When less is really more
When less is really more
ETH researchers have found that therapeutic iron supplements may be less effective when given in brief intervals: A peptide molecule blocks iron absorption in the intestine even 24 hours after the iron administation. Anaemia is often the result of an iron deficiency. In such cases the patients, who are typically female, will be prescribed iron supplements to be taken daily.

Health - Life Sciences - 27.10.2015
Intestinal worms
Intestinal worms "talk" to gut bacteria to boost the immune system
27.10.15 - EPFL researchers have discovered how intestinal worm infections cross-talk with gut bacteria to help the immune system. Intestinal worms infect over 2 billion people across the world, mostly children, in areas with poor sanitation. But despite causing serious health problems, worms can actually help the immune system of its host as an indirect way of protecting themselves.

Health - 23.10.2015
Monitoring critical blood levels in real time in the ICU
Monitoring critical blood levels in real time in the ICU
23.10.15 - For patients in intensive care, knowing how much glucose, lactate and other substances are in the blood is a question of life or death. EPFL has developed a miniaturized microfluidic device that will allow medical staff to monitor these levels in real time and react more quickly.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.10.2015
How the brain triggers action
How the brain triggers action
21.10.15 - EPFL scientists have identified specific neurons in the striatum that contribute to driving motivated behaviors like movement. The work may help in designing new ways of treating disorders like Parkinson's disease in the long term. Perhaps the brain's most important function is to process sensory information and make behavioral decisions based on it, like moving to grasp an object.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.10.2015
Genetic variation is key to fighting viruses
Genetic variation is key to fighting viruses
12.10.15 - Using a genome-wide association study, EPFL scientists have identified subtle genetic changes that can cause substantial differences to how we fight viral infections. When infected with a virus, the response of our immune systems varies widely from person to person. This variation is of great concern, as these differences can determine clinical outcome as well as effectiveness of vaccinations.

Health - Pharmacology - 27.05.2015
Novartis presents new data on 21 medicines and 11 investigational compounds at ASCO and EHA
Overall survival data for Tafinlar and Mekinist combination to be presented in metastatic BRAF V600E/K mutation-positive cutaneous melanoma   New data for Zykadia in ALK+ non-small cell lung cancer (

Computer Science / Telecom - Health - 04.03.2015
Kids and robots learn to write together
Kids and robots learn to write together
Who is the teacher: the student or the machine? By showing a robot how to write letters, children improve their writing skills and gain self-­-confidence.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.02.2015
Lab-on-a-chip to study single cells
Lab-on-a-chip to study single cells
Scientists at EPFL have developed a new lab-on-a-chip technique to analyze single cells from entire population. The new method, which uses beads and microfluidics can change the way we study mixed populations of cells, such as those of tumors. Individual cells in a population, e.g. a tumor, can vary greatly in terms of biochemistry and function.

Health - Life Sciences - 26.01.2015
Zombie bacteria in tuberculosis
Zombie bacteria in tuberculosis
"Living-dead" bacteria exist in limbo: biologically active but not proliferating. Buried in this zombie state, disease-causing bacteria could come back from the dead to re-infect patients. Researchers at EPFL have produced the first evidence of this strange phenomenon in tuberculosis, suggesting new avenues for treatment.

Life Sciences - Health - 05.01.2015
Killing for DNA: a predatory device in the cholera bacterium
Killing for DNA: a predatory device in the cholera bacterium
Sscientists have uncovered the unconventional way that the cholera bacterium stabs and kills other bacteria to steal their DNA, making it potentially more virulent. Cholera is caused when the bacterium Vibrio cholerae infects the small intestine. The disease is characterized by acute watery diarrhea resulting in severe dehydration.