news from the lab 2016


Category


Years
2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008


Results 41 - 60 of 264.

Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
01.11.2016
Tuberculosis bacteria find their ecological niche
Tuberculosis bacteria find their ecological niche
Researchers at the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) and the University of Basel have isolated and analyzed genetically tuberculosis bacteria from several thousand patients from over a hundred countries. This analysis demonstrates that the tuberculosis bacteria vary in their ecological niche.
Physics/Materials Science
01.11.2016
Hot on the heels of quasiparticles
Hot on the heels of quasiparticles
Electrons in a solid can team up to form so-called quasiparticles, which lead to new phenomena. Physicists at ETH in Zurich have now studied previously unidentified quasiparticles in a new class of atomically thin semiconductors.
Chemistry - Physics/Materials Science
30.10.2016
Ceramics 3D printed from foams
Ceramics 3D printed from foams
ETH researchers have used an additive manufacturing process to print an extremely porous ceramic component. Manufacturing a material of this kind with a 3D printer is a considerable achievement. Doctoral student Carla Minas, from the Complex Materials group led by ETH Professor André Studart, has succeeded in creating a highly porous and yet extremely robust ceramic material, which she ‘printed' using an additive manufacturing process.
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
27.10.2016
Finally red!
Finally red!
Empa researchers have pulled off a masterstroke of ceramics research: as of now, a dark-red ceramic bezel adorns a Swiss luxury watch - a world premiere and stunning example of top-flight materials science.
Astronomy - Education/Continuing Education
27.10.2016
How planets like Jupiter form
How planets like Jupiter form
Young giant planets are born from gas and dust. Researchers of ETH Zürich and the Universities of Zürich and Bern simulated different scenarios relying on the computing power of the Swiss National Supercomputing Centre (CSCS) to find out how they exactly form and evolve. Astronomers set up two theories explaining how gaseous giant planets like Jupiter or Saturn could be born.
Life Sciences - Administration/Government
25.10.2016
Iron supplements in the fight against lead
Iron supplements in the fight against lead
Targeted iron supplements in biscuits can achieve a striking reduction in the level of lead in children's blood in regions with high exposure to this toxic heavy metal. This has been demonstrated for the first time by an ETH-led research group in a study of schoolchildren in Morocco. Lead is a toxic heavy metal that was added to petrol for use in cars until as recently as 25 years ago, including in Switzerland.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
24.10.2016
Calcium Induces Chronic Lung Infections
Calcium Induces Chronic Lung Infections
The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a life-threatening pathogen in hospitals. About ten percent of all nosocomial infections, in particular pneumonia, are caused by this pathogen. Researchers from the University of Basel's Biozentrum, have now discovered that calcium induces the switch from acute to chronic infection.
Astronomy - Education/Continuing Education
24.10.2016
Preferentially Earth-sized planets with lots of water
Preferentially Earth-sized planets with lots of water
Computer simulations by astrophysicists at the University of Bern of the formation of planets orbiting in the habitable zone of low mass stars such as Proxima Centauri show that these planets are most likely to be roughly the size of the Earth and to contain large amounts of water.
Astronomy - Life Sciences
24.10.2016
Researching phytoplankton in zero gravity
Researching phytoplankton in zero gravity
Swiss researchers have used a parabolic flight to investigate the effects of weightlessness on biological and physical processes. On board was an experiment from ETH Zurich designed to understand the influence of gravity on the migratory behaviour of aquatic microorganisms. A high-flying and unusual experiment: 'We were able to test an important hypothesis: changes in relative gravity, which routinely occur in aquatic environments due to turbulence, have a significant impact on the behaviour of microorganisms,' reports Roman Stocker after the second Swiss zero-g research flight.
Chemistry
20.10.2016
Turning biofuel waste into wealth in a single step
Turning biofuel waste into wealth in a single step
Lignin is a bulky chain of molecules found in wood and is usually discarded during biofuel production. But in a new method by EPFL chemists, the simple addition of formaldehyde could turn it into the main focus. Reducing our reliance on fossil fuels means turning to plant-derived biofuels and chemicals.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
20.10.2016
First cyborg bacteria developed
First cyborg bacteria developed
ETH scientists have constructed bacteria in which growth can be controlled fully automatically by a computer.
Business/Economics - Psychology
19.10.2016
Overcoming egocentricity increases self-control
Overcoming egocentricity increases self-control
Should I buy a new car now or save the money for retirement? Such situations require self-control in order to resist the immediately tempting offer for the sake of more important outcomes in the future. It is widely accepted that self-control is regulated by mechanisms in the brain area called the “prefrontal cortex”, with the ability to keep oneself at bay when tempted by immediately appealing offers.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
19.10.2016
A vitamin could help treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy
A vitamin could help treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy
Researchers are working on a new strategy to combat one of the most severe forms of muscular dystrophy. Rather than acting on the defective gene, they are using large doses of a vitamin. Duchenne is the most common and severe form of muscular dystrophy. Because of this genetic disease, one out of every 3,500 children spends their 12th birthday in a wheelchair.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Medicine/Pharmacology
19.10.2016
From trees to paper: how Swiss wood impacts the environment
From trees to paper: how Swiss wood impacts the environment
Wood has a largely favourable environmental effect. A study of the National Research Programme "Resource Wood" recommends using wood more widely as a source of energy and as a building material.
Computer Science/Telecom
18.10.2016
Plotting Pokémon Go's success
Plotting Pokémon Go's success
Since the popular game came out this past summer, the number of videos about it on YouTube has skyrocketed.
Life Sciences - Physics/Materials Science
14.10.2016
Bacteria can make underground nuclear waste repositories safer
Bacteria can make underground nuclear waste repositories safer
Naturally occurring bacteria could consume pent-up hydrogen gas in nuclear waste repositories to prevent radioactive leaks, say researchers at EPFL. Scientists may have found an unexpected ally in the long-term disposal of nuclear waste: bacteria. In a recent study, a research team led by EPFL discovered a microbial community made up of seven species of bacteria that live naturally hundreds of meters underground in the very rock layers that have been chosen to host Swiss nuclear waste.
Medicine/Pharmacology
13.10.2016
Peptides vs. superbugs
Peptides vs. superbugs
Several peptides have an antibacterial effect - but they are broken down in the human body too quickly to exert this effect. Empa researchers have now succeeded in encasing peptides in a protective coat, which could prolong their life in the human body. This is an important breakthrough because peptides are considered to be a possible solution in the fight against antibiotic-resistant bacteria.
Careers/Employment - Psychology
12.10.2016
Swiss employees do not hold back on cynical behaviour
Swiss employees do not hold back on cynical behaviour
This year's Swiss Human Relations Barometer focuses on the main discussion topic of "loyalty and cynicism" and cynicism, - a negative, even derisive, attitude that employees develop toward their employers.
Microtechnics/Electroengineering - Computer Science/Telecom
12.10.2016
Soft robots that mimic human muscles
Soft robots that mimic human muscles
An EPFL team is developing soft, flexible and reconfigurable robots. Air-actuated, they behave like human muscles and may be used in physical rehabilitation.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Computer Science/Telecom
11.10.2016
Ultrasound imaging is gaining in precision
Ultrasound imaging is gaining in precision
Researchers have developed an image-reconstruction algorithm that improves the performance of ultrasound equipment. This breakthrough could have important implications in the fields of cardiology and neurosurgery. Over the past 30 years, ultrasound has become one of the most widely used imaging technologies in medicine.

 
 
Jobs on