news from the lab 2016


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Results 81 - 100 of 264.

Physics/Materials Science - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
06.09.2016
En route to better transformers
En route to better transformers
Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI have found a way of looking inside the iron core of transformers. Transformers are indispensable in regulating electricity both in industry and in domestic households. The better their iron cores are magnetized, the less energy they lose and the more efficiently they work.
Astronomy
05.09.2016
First gravitational waves form after 10 million years
First gravitational waves form after 10 million years
In his General Theory of Relativity, Albert Einstein predicted gravitational waves over a century ago; this year, they were detected directly for the first time: The American Gravitational Wave Obser
Microtechnics/Electroengineering - Physics/Materials Science
05.09.2016
New simulations of wind power generation
New simulations of wind power generation
ETH researcher Stefan Pfenninger and his colleague Iain Staffell from Imperial College London have developed new multi-decade simulations of wind power production in Europe. In doing so, they have uncovered significant distortions in the data used in the past, and have produced fresh simulations of wind power output with country-specific corrections.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Mechanical Engineering/Mechanics
05.09.2016
Stretching cells to learn more about them
Stretching cells to learn more about them
05.09.16 - A tool developed at EPFL can stretch and compress cells, mimicking what happens in the body.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
31.08.2016
Antibody Reduces Harmful Brain Amyloid Plaques in Alzheimer's Patients
Antibody Reduces Harmful Brain Amyloid Plaques in Alzheimer’s Patients
Although the causes of Alzheimer's disease are still unknown, it is clear that the disease commences with progressive amyloid deposition in the brains of affected persons between ten and fifteen years before the emergence of initial clinical symptoms such as memory loss. Researchers have now been able to show that Aducanumab, a human monoclonal antibody, selectively binds brain amyloid plaques, thus enabling microglial cells to remove the plaques.
Careers/Employment - Media
30.08.2016
Nonwork orientations are related to higher career and life satisfaction
Nonwork orientations are related to higher career and life satisfaction
Media releases, information for representatives of the media Media Relations (E) When planning a career, many people take nonwork orientations into account, such as family, personal interests and civic engagement. Psychologists from the University of Bern (Switzerland) have found out that people who strongly consider the role of the family in career planning report more satisfaction with their career and their lives in general.
Social Sciences
29.08.2016
Fair or Unfair? Facial Cues Influence how Social Exclusion Is Judged
Fair or Unfair? Facial Cues Influence how Social Exclusion Is Judged
People are often excluded from social groups. As researchers from the University of Basel report in the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, whether uninvolved observers find this acceptable or not may depend on the facial appearances of those excluded. The exclusion of cold and incompetent looking people is more likely to be accepted.
Life Sciences - Chemistry
29.08.2016
Bringing artificial enzymes closer to nature
Bringing artificial enzymes closer to nature
Scientists at the University of Basel, ETH Zurich in Basel, and NCCR Molecular Systems Engineering have developed an artificial metalloenzyme that catalyses a reaction inside of cells without equivalent in nature. This could be a prime example for creating new non-natural metabolic pathways inside living cells, as reported today in Nature.
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
25.08.2016
An effective and low-cost solution for storing solar energy
An effective and low-cost solution for storing solar energy
25.08.16 - Solar energy can be stored by converting it into hydrogen. But current methods are too expensive and don't last long. Using commercially available solar cells and none of the usual rare metals, researchers at EPFL and CSEM have now designed a device that outperforms in stability, efficiency and cost.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
23.08.2016
Genetic Regulation of the Thymus Function Identified
Genetic Regulation of the Thymus Function Identified
Researchers at the universities of Basel and Oxford have for the first time identified all genes regulated by the protein Foxn1. The results show that Foxn1 not only plays a crucial role in development of the thymus in the embryo, but it also regulates vital functions in the developed, postnatal organ.
Life Sciences - Physics/Materials Science
22.08.2016
Catching proteins in the act
Catching proteins in the act
Some of the fastest processes in our body run their course in proteins activated by light. The protein rhodopsin sees to it that our eyes can rapidly take in their ever-changing surroundings. Free-electron X-ray lasers such as SwissFEL at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI now make it possible for the first time to catch such processes in flagranti.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
22.08.2016
Sick animals limit disease transmission by isolating themselves from their peers
Sick animals limit disease transmission by isolating themselves from their peers
Sick wild house mice spend time away from their social groups, leading to a decrease in their potential for disease transmission according to a new study by evolutionary biologists from the University of Zurich in collaboration with the ETH Zurich. The results can improve models focused on predicting the spread of infectious diseases like influenza or Ebola in humans.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
19.08.2016
Neural Stem Cells Control their own Fate
Neural Stem Cells Control their own Fate
To date, it has been assumed that the differentiation of stem cells depends on the environment they are embedded in.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
18.08.2016
Genetic code: Stop does not always mean stop
Genetic code: Stop does not always mean stop
The genetic code is believed to be strongly conserved through evolution - from the earliest bacteria until today. But researchers from the Institute of Cell Biology of the University of Bern have now found two ciliate species where nature probably can be seen experimenting with the meaning of a codon, the building blocks of genetic communication.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Physics/Materials Science
17.08.2016
A tiny wire with a memory to diagnose cancer
A tiny wire with a memory to diagnose cancer
EPFL researchers have used a nanowire to detect prostate cancer with greater accuracy than ever before. Their device is ten times more sensitive than any other biosensor available. Researchers at EPFL's Integrated Systems Laboratory (LSI/STI) have developed a new type of sensor that can detect tiny quantities of these markers and thus improve diagnostic accuracy.
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
17.08.2016
Researchers Watch Catalysts at Work
Researchers Watch Catalysts at Work
Physicists at the University of Basel have succeeded in watching a silver catalyst at work for the first time with the aid of an atomic force microscope. The observations made during an Ullmann reaction have allowed the researchers to calculate the energy turnover and, potentially, to optimize the catalysis.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Business/Economics
12.08.2016
Gastrointestinal illnesses cost the Swiss health care sector up to EUR 45 million per year
Gastrointestinal illnesses cost the Swiss health care sector up to EUR 45 million per year
Acute diarrhoea entails annual health care costs of EUR 29 to 45 million in Switzerland. Thereof, around a quarter is due to infections of the diarrhoea-causing pathogen Campylobacter. This was revealed in a new study by the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH). In Switzerland, between 300,000 and 700,000 patients per year visit a doctor due to acute diarrhoea.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
10.08.2016
A Breakthrough in Combating Malaria with Odour-Baited Trap for Mosquitoes
A Breakthrough in Combating Malaria with Odour-Baited Trap for Mosquitoes
The use of a newly-developed mosquito trap incorporating human odour has resulted in a 70% decline in the population of the most significant malaria mosquito on the Kenyan island of Rusinga. In the following, the number of malaria infections declined by 30% according to a «Lancet»-study published today.
Life Sciences - Earth Sciences
09.08.2016
Origin of the turtle shell lies in digging
Origin of the turtle shell lies in digging
In today's turtles the shell has a key protective function. The animals can withdraw into it and protect themselves against predators.
Chemistry - Life Sciences
09.08.2016
Synthetic Biology: Engineering a Chemical Switch into a Light-driven Proton Pump
Synthetic Biology: Engineering a Chemical Switch into a Light-driven Proton Pump
Synthetic biology is an emerging and rapidly evolving engineering discipline.

 
 
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