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Health - Pharmacology - 15.03.2018
New Understanding of Parasite Biology Might Help Stop Malaria Transmission
New Understanding of Parasite Biology Might Help Stop Malaria Transmission
Researchers at the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute and the University of Basel made an important step toward a deeper understanding of how malaria blood stage parasites turn the switch to become transmissible to other humans. This knowledge is fundamental for future research aiming to interrupt malaria transmission.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 14.03.2018
Climate change drives mountain hares to higher altitudes
Climate change drives mountain hares to higher altitudes
A warming climate will shrink and fragment mountain hare habitat in the Swiss Alps. Populations are likely to decline as a result, concludes an international study led by the University of Bern and the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research (WSL). Specialised species like the mountain hare, adapted to life at high altitudes, are particularly affected by climate change.

Chemistry - Physics - 13.03.2018
Cleaner diesel emissions
Cleaner diesel emissions
More effective control of diesel nitrogen oxides through dosed addition of ammonia In diesel engines, the burning of the fuel releases nitrogen oxides (NOx), which are harmful to human health. The automobile industry therefore developed a technique that reduces these emissions: Gaseous ammonia is added to the exhaust and, prompted by a catalyst, reacts with the nitrogen oxides to produce harmless nitrogen and water.

Environment - 12.03.2018
Accurately measuring embodied carbon in buildings
Accurately measuring embodied carbon in buildings
Embodied carbon in the construction industry is a major factor of climate change, but it is rarely measured accurately.

Chemistry - Physics - 08.03.2018
Strom on demand
Strom on demand
If photovoltaic or wind power plants produce more electricity than the network can absorb, valuable energy is lost. At the ESI Platform, PSI researchers are investigating how fuel cells can contribute to making this energy usable in a targeted way through storage. The power network cannot store energy.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.03.2018
Why asbestos is so dangerous
Why asbestos is so dangerous
Long, pointed asbestos fibres induce chronic inflammation, which can lead to cancer. SNSF-funded researchers have found underlying mechanisms for this and hope their results will help prevent damage. The fact that asbestos causes cancer has been largely undisputed for nearly 50 years. Now, researchers supported by the Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF) have discovered why the fibres cause such damage to the body.

History / Archeology - 08.03.2018
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Deep in a swamp in the Russian republic of Tuva, SNSF-funded archaeologist Gino Caspari has discovered an undisturbed Scythian burial mound. All the evidence suggests that this is not only the largest Scythian princely tomb in South Siberia, but also the earliest - and that it may be harbouring some outstandingly well-preserved treasures.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.03.2018
Inherited mutation leads to overproduction of EPO
Inherited mutation leads to overproduction of EPO
A newly-discovered hereditary mutation is responsible for an increased production of erythropoietin (EPO) in the blood. This mutation causes a messenger RNA (mRNA) that is not normally involved in the formation of proteins to be reprogrammed so that it produces EPO, thus abnormally increasing the number of red blood cells.

Health - Materials Science - 08.03.2018
A retinal implant that is more effective against blindness
EPFL researchers have developed a new type of retinal implant for people who have become blind due to the loss of photoreceptor cells in their retinas. The implant partially restores their visual field and can significantly improve their quality of life. Thirty-two million people around the world are blind.

Life Sciences - Health - 08.03.2018
Recovery from Spinal Cord Injuries Can Be Predicted
Recovery from Spinal Cord Injuries Can Be Predicted
A trauma to the spinal cord, quickly leads to a progressive loss of nerve tissue. This not only affects the injured area, but over time affects also other parts of the spinal cord and even the brain. These neurodegenerative changes can be explored in detail using magnetic resonance imaging.

Pharmacology - 07.03.2018
Cocaine levels in wastewater higher than ever
Cocaine levels in wastewater higher than ever
In 2017, 68 cities (mostly in Europe) again took part in a large-scale project measuring drug levels in wastewater. The results for 2017 were published today by the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA). One particularly striking finding is that levels of benzoylecgonine - an indicator of cocaine use - rose almost everywhere, by an average of 30% among the 17 cities which have participated in the project since 2011.

Astronomy / Space Science - Earth Sciences - 07.03.2018
University of Basel tests camera for Mars rover
University of Basel tests camera for Mars rover
In 2020, the European Space Agency (ESA) is sending a rover into space to examine the surface of Mars for signs of life. Its on-board equipment includes a high-resolution camera developed in Switzerland, and researchers from the University of Basel are currently testing the camera's operation in an artificial Martian landscape.

Health - Pharmacology - 06.03.2018
HIV in sub-Sahara Africa: Testing and Treatment Start at Home Improves Therapy Outcome
HIV in sub-Sahara Africa: Testing and Treatment Start at Home Improves Therapy Outcome
Home-based HIV testing and prompt treatment with antiretroviral therapy increases the number of patients under treatment as well as treatment success. This is the key result of a clinical trial in Lesotho carried out by the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, in collaboration with SolidarMed and the Government of Lesotho.

Materials Science - Physics - 06.03.2018
A treasure trove for nanotechnology experts
A treasure trove for nanotechnology experts
A team from EPFL and NCCR Marvel has identified more than 1,000 materials with a particularly interesting 2D structure. Their research, which made the cover page of Nature Nanotechnlogy, paves the way for groundbreaking technological applications. 2D materials, which consist of a few layers of atoms, may well be the future of nanotechnology.

Life Sciences - Health - 06.03.2018
Our circadian clock sets the rhythm for our cells' powerhouses
Our circadian clock sets the rhythm for our cells’ powerhouses
Cellular energy metabolism also follows the rhythm of the circadian clock. A University of Basel study has now shown exactly how this works by revealing the relationship between the circadian rhythm and the mitochondrial network for the first time. Countless genetically controlled clocks tick inside different parts of our bodies, such as the liver, kidneys and heart.

Environment - Life Sciences - 06.03.2018
Why rare plants are rare
Why rare plants are rare
Rare plant species suffer more from disease than commoner species. The fact that rare species are more susceptible to attack by micro-organisms living in the soil, such as fungi and bacteria, may in fact be one of the reasons they are rare. Biologists have been trying to work out why some species are rare, while others are common, since Darwin's time and a new study from researchers at the University of Bern provides a possible answer.

Astronomy / Space Science - 05.03.2018
Comet "Chury’s" late birth
Comets which consist of two parts, like Chury, can form after a catastrophic collision of larger bodies. Such collisions may have taken place in a later phase of our solar system, which suggests that Chury can be much younger than previously assumed. This is shown through computer simulations by an international research group with the participation of the University of Bern.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 05.03.2018
Sacrificing ground floors can save lives
Sacrificing ground floors can save lives
Disasters like tsunamis, hurricanes and dam failures are rare but can have devastating consequences on a country. A thesis at EPFL has shown that appropriate construction methods can substantially reduce the impact of such catastrophic events. Davide Wüthrich, a PhD student at EPFL, has just finished his thesis on methods for reducing the damage caused when a wave hits a building.

Physics - Materials Science - 02.03.2018
Controlling skyrmions with lasers
EPFL scientists have produced controllable stable skyrmions using laser pulses, taking a step towards significantly more energy-efficient memory devices. The work is published in Physical Review Letters. A skyrmion is a collection of electron spins that look like a vortex in certain magnetic materials.

Life Sciences - Physics - 28.02.2018
Super-resolution microscopy in both space and time
Super-resolution microscopy in both space and time
In a breakthrough for biological imaging, EPFL scientists have developed the first microscope platform that can perform super-resolution spatial and temporal imaging, capturing unprecedented views inside living cells. The landmark paper is published. Super-resolution microscopy is a technique that can "see" beyond the diffraction of light, providing unprecedented views of cells and their interior structures and organelles.
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