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Results 261 - 280 of 524.


Physics - Mathematics - 05.07.2019
Simulating quantum systems with neural networks
Simulating quantum systems with neural networks
A new computational method, based on neural networks, can simulate open quantum systems with unprecedented versatility. The method was independently developed by physicists at EPFL, France, the UK, and the US, and is published in Physical Review Letters. Even on the scale of everyday life, nature is governed by the laws of quantum physics.

Environment - 04.07.2019
How trees could save the climate
How trees could save the climate
Around 0.9 billion hectares of land worldwide would be suitable for reforestation, which could ultimately capture two thirds of human-made carbon emissions. The Crowther Lab of ETH Zurich has published a study in the journal Science that shows this would be the most effective method to combat climate change.

Chemistry - Physics - 04.07.2019
Molecular energy machine as a movie star
Molecular energy machine as a movie star
Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI have used the Swiss Light Source SLS to record a molecular energy machine in action and thus to reveal how energy production at cell membranes works. For this purpose they developed a new investigative method that could make the analysis of cellular processes significantly more effective than before.

Innovation - Environment - 04.07.2019
The future energy system and
The future energy system and "Power-to-X"
In a joint research project involving five Swiss Competence Centers for Energy Research (SCCERs), scientists from the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Empa, ETH Zurich, the Zurich University of Applied Sciences (ZHAW), the Rapperswil University of Applied Sciences (HSR), the University of Geneva and the University of Lucerne have drawn up a White Paper entitled "Power-to-X" for the Swiss Federal Energy Research Commission (CORE).

Environment - Politics - 04.07.2019
Trade agreements only partly shift environmental burden onto poorer countries
Trade agreements only partly shift environmental burden onto poorer countries
Is trade liberalisation shifting environmental burden from industrialised countries to poorer ones' This question was investigated by a research team at ETH Zurich led by Thomas Bernauer. In particular, they analysed whether, and if so how, commerce driven by free trade agreements is transferring environmental impacts from industrialised countries to poorer ones.

Innovation - Administration - 04.07.2019
New approach to energy strategy accounts for uncertainty
EPFL scientists have developed a model that can help policymakers factor in uncertainty when they map out their energy strategies. Today such strategies are based largely on forecasts of fuelprices, technology costs and energy demand. However, these forecasts are often incorrect and can lead to flawed decisions.

Environment - Innovation - 03.07.2019
The energy system of the future and Power-to-X
The energy system of the future and Power-to-X
In a joint research project of five Swiss competence centres for energy research, scientists have prepared a white paper on "Power-to-X" for consideration by the Swiss Federal Energy Research Commission (CORE). The goal of the white paper is to gather together the most important insights available on Power-to-X technologies.

Health - Psychology - 03.07.2019
Capability assessments: making them more consistent
On behalf of social security institutions, psychiatrists assess to what extent people with mental health problems are still able to work. However, the work capability assessments tend to be far too dissimilar. A new training course has helped to reduce the differences. This confirms a study conducted by researchers in Basel.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 03.07.2019
Influence in absentia
Influence in absentia
The preferred food of pike in shallow lakes in Denmark and Sweden is roach. Seven in ten fish found by researchers in the stomachs of pike were roach - and the numbers tended to be even higher in wintertime. The roach that pike ate in lakes with tributary or outflowing rivers were, admittedly, smaller during the winter, and became somewhat thinner as winter went on.

Environment - Civil Engineering - 03.07.2019
AI-designed heat pumps consume less energy
AI-designed heat pumps consume less energy
Researchers at EPFL have developed a method that uses artificial intelligence to design next-generation heat-pump compressors. Their method can cut the pumps' power requirement by around 25%. In Switzerland, 50-60% of new homes are equipped with heat pumps. These systems draw in thermal energy from the surrounding environment - such as from the ground, air, or a nearby lake or river - and turn it into heat for buildings.

Health - Pharmacology - 28.06.2019
Medicines made of solid gold to help the immune system
Medicines made of solid gold to help the immune system
By studying the effects of gold nanoparticles on the immune cells related to antibody production,  researchers at UNIGE, at Swansea University and at the NCCR "Bio-inspired Materials" are paving the way for more effective vaccines and therapies. Over the past twenty years, the use of nanoparticles in medicine has steadily increased.

Computer Science - Social Sciences - 28.06.2019
What can Wikipedia tell us about human interaction?
What can Wikipedia tell us about human interaction?
EPFL researchers have studied the dynamics of network structures using one of the world's most-visited websites: Wikipedia. In addition to a better understanding of online networks, their work brings exciting insights into human social behavior and collective memory. Have you ever visited a Wikipedia page to answer a question, only to find yourself clicking from page to page, until you end up on a topic wildly different from the one you started with?

Life Sciences - Health - 27.06.2019
Growing embryonic tissues on a chip
Growing embryonic tissues on a chip
Researchers at EPFL have developed a method to stimulate human stem cells to organize themselves into ordered layers of different cell types. Published , the method is based on microfluidics and can help better understand how tissues are formed in the embryo, setting the stage for fabricating functional tissues and organs for drug testing and transplantation.

Earth Sciences - 27.06.2019
When Lake Zurich guarantees the best cool-down
When Lake Zurich guarantees the best cool-down
Two years ago, researchers from Eawag and EPFL posted a publicly accessible 3D model on www.meteolakes.ch * that uses current and forecast data from MeteoSchweiz, hydrological data from the Federal Office for the Environment and satellite data to map lake water temperatures. The temperatures are calculated for different depths and with a temporal resolution of three hours.

Health - Pharmacology - 27.06.2019
Interventions for Schistosomiasis Elimination in Zanzibar
Interventions for Schistosomiasis Elimination in Zanzibar
Schistosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease with a huge impact on global health. More than 200 million people are infected, mainly in sub-Saharan Africa. Researchers from Swiss TPH, the Natural History Museum London and partner institutions in Zanzibar have published a study on interventions for schistosomiasis elimination in Zanzibar, which found that while schistosomiasis was eliminated as a public health problem in over 90% of the study regions, transmission is not yet interrupted and reinfection occurs.

Health - Pharmacology - 27.06.2019
Hydrogel developed at EPFL offers real promise in treating diabetes
Hydrogel developed at EPFL offers real promise in treating diabetes
Researchers at EPFL have developed a hydrogel that offers unrivaled protection against transplanted cell rejection. The School's Technology Transfer Office has licensed the new product to Cell-Caps, a Geneva-based startup specialized in cell encapsulation for treating diabetes. Transplanted tissue often comes under attack from the body's immune system and struggles to survive in the hostile host environment.

Health - Life Sciences - 26.06.2019
Is multiple sclerosis linked to childhood viral infections?
Is multiple sclerosis linked to childhood viral infections?
UNIGE researchers have discovered a potential link between viral infections in the brain in childhood and the risk to develop auto-immune disease in adulthood. Although the exact causes of multiple sclerosis still remain unknown, it is assumed that the disease is triggered by a combination of genetic and environmental risk factors.

Health - Life Sciences - 26.06.2019
Neuronal Parkinson inclusions are different than expected
Neuronal Parkinson inclusions are different than expected
An international team of researchers involving members of the University of Basel's Biozentrum challenges the conventional understanding of the cause of Parkinson's disease. The researchers have shown that the inclusions in the brain's neurons, characteristic of Parkinson's disease, are comprised of a membranous medley rather than protein fibrils.

Life Sciences - 25.06.2019
How the Chlamydosaurus dragon got its frill
How the Chlamydosaurus dragon got its frill
Studying the developing embryo of the 'frilled dragon' lizard, UNIGE researchers reveal that physical forces, rather than a genetic program, generate the characteristic folds of its spectacular collar. The frilled dragon exhibits a distinctive large erectile ruff. This lizard usually keeps the frill folded back against its body but can spread it as a spectacular display to scare off predators.