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Results 301 - 320 of 524.


Health - 13.06.2019
Three quarters of people living with axial spondyloarthritis struggle to find a job, IMAS survey shows
New European data from IMAS survey show that people living with axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) suffer a delay in diagnosis of over 7 years, potentially leading to an increase in work-related issues due to worsening disease burden   The experience of people living with axSpA, a long-term inflammatory spine condition as prevalent as rheumatoid arthritis , , needs to be better understood to help patients manage their disease    The Ankylosing Spon

Life Sciences - Environment - 13.06.2019
Neurotoxins damage aquatic organisms differently than expected
Neurotoxins damage aquatic organisms differently than expected
The insecticide imidacloprid is one of the strongest insect toxins and belongs to the group of neonicotinoids. Since 2019, the use of imidacloprid, along with two other substances in this group, is only allowed in greenhouses, as this substance is one of those responsible for the death of bees. Imidacloprid is also very toxic for aquatic organisms; as is stated in the manufacturer's certification reports.

Life Sciences - 12.06.2019
Reaching and Grasping - Learning fine motor coordination changes the brain
Reaching and Grasping - Learning fine motor coordination changes the brain
When we train the reaching for and grasping of objects, we also train our brain. In other words, this action brings about changes in the connections of a certain neuronal population in the red nucleus, a region of the midbrain. Researchers at the University of Basel's Biozentrum have discovered this group of nerve cells in the red nucleus.

Pharmacology - Chemistry - 11.06.2019
Learning from Nature's Bounty: New Libraries for Drug discovery
Learning from Nature’s Bounty: New Libraries for Drug discovery
Natural products, or their close derivatives, make some of our most potent medicines, among which macrocycles with their large carbon-rich ring systems are one class. The size and complexity of macrocycles has made it difficult to emulate and build on Nature's success in the laboratory.

Health - 11.06.2019
A new approach to modeling tumors
A new approach to modeling tumors
Researchers at EPFL and the University of Lyon have developed a device for creating cell aggregates in a fully controlled manner. Their aim is to model tumors more accurately in order to test potential new treatments. When researchers develop new therapies, such as for cancer, they need to be able to test them on models that closely resemble human tissue.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.06.2019
The cholera bacterium's 3-in-1 toolkit for life in the ocean
The cholera bacterium's 3-in-1 toolkit for life in the ocean
The cholera bacterium uses a grappling hook-like appendage to take up DNA, bind to nutritious surfaces and recognise 'family' members, EPFL scientists have found. These discoveries will advance our understanding of how the bacterium that causes cholera adapts and survives in its natural environment.

Life Sciences - Physics - 10.06.2019
New method reveals principles of chromatin folding in vivo
New method reveals principles of chromatin folding in vivo
Characterizing chromosome structure is fundamental to a better understanding of gene expression. Current experimental methods helped to build mechanistic models of chromosome folding, however they could not be formally validated so far by independent techniques. This is what the Giorgetti group just did - thanks to a new method they developed to measure chromosome structure quantitatively in living cells.

Life Sciences - 07.06.2019
When social interaction helps you choose your food
When social interaction helps you choose your food
By deciphering the neural mechanisms involved in food consumption, UNIGE scientists demonstrate the importance of social interactions when choosing food and, more broadly, when adapting to the environment. How do we choose our food? By studying the neurobiological mechanisms involved in food choices of rodents, neuroscientists at the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, have identified the important and lasting influence that peers can have on eating habits.

Music - 06.06.2019
Decoding Beethoven's music style using data science
Decoding Beethoven's music style using data science
What makes Beethoven sound like Beethoven? EPFL researchers have completed a first analysis of Beethoven's writing style, applying statistical techniques to unlock recurring patterns. EPFL researchers are investigating Beethoven's composition style and they are using statistical techniques to quantify and explore the patterns that characterize musical structures in the Western classical tradition.

Environment - Innovation - 06.06.2019
Four Scientific Institutions will Monitor Switzerland from Space
Four Scientific Institutions will Monitor Switzerland from Space
The Swiss Data Cube (SDC) is an innovative technology that gathers all available satellite images from the American Landsat program and the European Sentinel 1 and 2. UNEP/GRID-Geneva, the University of Geneva (UNIGE), the University of Zurich (UZH) and the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research (WSL) have entered a new cooperation agreement to foster the use of Earth Observation data for environmental monitoring at national scale.

Life Sciences - Health - 05.06.2019
"Goldilocks" neurons promote REM sleep
It has been a mystery why REM sleep, or dream sleep, increases when the room temperature is "just right". Neuroscientists from Bern show that melanin-concentrating hormone neurons within the hypothalamus increase REM sleep when the need for body temperature defense is minimized, such as when sleeping in a warm and comfortable room temperature.

Environment - 05.06.2019
Extreme heat to hit one third of the african urban population
Extreme heat to hit one third of the african urban population
An international team of researchers has combined demographic projections and climate scenarios across Africa for the first time. Their results reveal the number of people who will potentially be exposed to extreme temperatures. Climate change, population growth and urbanisation are instrumental in increasing exposure to extreme temperatures.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 04.06.2019
A combination of insecticides and mite weakens honeybees
A combination of insecticides and mite weakens honeybees
Today, scientists of the Institute of Bee Health of the University of Bern and the honeybee research association COLOSS have published an article in the peer-reviewed journal Scientific Reports that shows a synergistic time-lag interaction between the parasitic mite Varroa destructor and neonicotinoid insecticides reducing survival of winter honeybees, Apis mellifera.

Environment - Chemistry - 04.06.2019
Floating power plants
Floating power plants
Huge floating solar islands on the ocean that produce enough energy to enable CO2-neutral global freight traffic - what sounds like "science fiction" researchers from ETH Zurich, the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Empa, the Universities of Zurich and Bern and the Nowegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) in Trondheim have now calculated for the first time, as they write in the latest issue of the journal "Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences" (PNAS).

Materials Science - Physics - 04.06.2019
New material with magnetic shape memory
New material with magnetic shape memory
Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI and ETH Zurich have developed a new material whose shape memory is activated by magnetism. It retains a given shape when it is put into a magnetic field. It is a composite material consisting of two components. What is special about the new material is that, unlike previous shape-memory materials, it consists of a polymer and droplets of a so-called magnetorheological fluid embedded in it.

Life Sciences - Environment - 03.06.2019
"Copying & pasting" a gene allows stickleback to live in freshwater habitats
Darwin himself recognised the principle of adaptive radiation as being an important process in evolution. This principle says that, in a competitive situation, individuals in a species will search for new niches, where their populations adapt to environmental conditions through natural selection. This means that a single original species can fan out and evolve into numerous species with different niches.

Physics - Chemistry - 03.06.2019
Exposing modern forgers
Exposing modern forgers
Researchers at ETH Zurich have developed a process that can provide conclusive evidence with regard to modern fakes of paintings, even in cases where the forger recycled older canvases. This verification process requires less than 200 micrograms of paint. Art forgeries have been around since ancient times.

Life Sciences - Physics - 30.05.2019
A new mechanism for accessing damaged DNA
A new mechanism for accessing damaged DNA
May 30, 2019 UV light damages the DNA of skin cells, which can lead to skin cancer. But this process is counteracted by the DNA repair machinery, acting as a molecular sunscreen. It has been unclear, however, how repair proteins work on DNA tightly packed in chromatin, where access to DNA damage is restricted by protein packaging.

Materials Science - 29.05.2019
Desired deformation
Desired deformation
Since last week there is a unique wooden building in the Remstal near Stuttgart: a tower made of self-formed spruce boards. The method, which has been developed at Empa and ETH Zurich, uses the natural swelling and shrinking of wood under the influence of moisture and thus enables a new and unexpected architecture for the construction with the renewable and sustainable resource of wood.

Life Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 29.05.2019
Chimpanzees Catch and Eat Crabs
Chimpanzees Catch and Eat Crabs
Chimpanzees have a mainly vegetarian diet, but do occasionally eat meat. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now shown for the first time that chimpanzees also eat crabs. In the rainforest of Guinea, the researchers observed how chimpanzees regularly fish for crabs. "Our study is the first evidence showing that non-human apes regularly catch and eat aquatic fauna," says Kathelijne Koops, researcher at the Department of Anthropology at the University of Zurich.