News 2019


Category


Years
2019 | 2018 | 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008


Results 61 - 80 of 291.


Environment - 19.06.2019
What role can households play in the energy transition?
What role can households play in the energy transition?
Researchers set up the ENERGISE project designed to help households reduce their energy consumption without compromising their levels of comfort. What role can households play in the energy transition? Can changes to everyday practices make a difference? The European ENERGISE project, led by the University of Geneva (UNIGE), in Switzerland, carried out an experiment to reduce energy consumption in 300 households in eight countries.

Social Sciences - Health - 17.06.2019
Social Exclusion Measured in fMRI
Social Exclusion Measured in fMRI
A fMRI study shows the effect of social support on the social exclusion experience. Social belonging is a fundamental need for the life of human beings.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 17.06.2019
Preventing drugs from being transported
Certain membrane proteins specialise in transporting molecules out of cells - a problem for the efficacy of cancer medication and antibiotics. An international research team has investigated the transport mechanism of a bacterial membrane protein using an artificially produced antibody fragment. The transport proteins, called ABC exporters, are present, for instance, in the cell membranes of bacteria and in large quantities in cancer cells and are responsible for transporting small molecules out of the cells.

Life Sciences - 17.06.2019
Rinsing System in Stomach Protects the Teeth of Ruminants
Rinsing System in Stomach Protects the Teeth of Ruminants
When they graze, goats, sheep and cows often ingest bits of earth that can be damaging to their teeth. Researchers from the University of Zurich have now shown how the animals protect themselves against dental abrasion: Their stomach system rinses dust and sand off the ingested food before it is chewed for the second time.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.06.2019
Schizophrenia: adolescence is the game-changer
Schizophrenia: adolescence is the game-changer
Researchers at UNIGE have discovered that the development of the hippocampus, the area of the brain responsible for memory and emotions, is severely impacted in adolescence following the onset of the first psychotic symptoms. Schizophrenia causes hallucinations and memory or cognition problems inter alia.

Pharmacology - Health - 14.06.2019
Compound with anti-aging effects passes human trial
Compound with anti-aging effects passes human trial
Urolithin A, a metabolite of biomolecules found in pomegranates and other fruits, could help slow certain aging processes. EPFL spin-off Amazentis, in conjunction with EPFL and the Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, has published a paper Metabolism outlining the results of their clinical trial. It is a fact of life that skeletal muscles begin to lose strength and mass once a person reaches the age of 50.

Chemistry - Environment - 13.06.2019
Carbon-neutral fuels move a step closer
Carbon-neutral fuels move a step closer
Chemists at EPFL have developed an efficient process for converting carbon dioxide into carbon monoxide, a key ingredient of synthetic fuels and materials. The carbon dioxide (CO2) produced when fossil fuels are burned is normally released into the atmosphere. Researchers working on synthetic fuels - also known as carbon-neutral fuels - are exploring ways to capture and recycle that CO2.

Environment - Innovation / Technology - 13.06.2019
Carbon-neutral fuel made from sunlight and air
Carbon-neutral fuel made from sunlight and air
Researchers from ETH Zurich have developed a novel technology that produces liquid hydrocarbon fuels exclusively from sunlight and air. For the first time worldwide they demonstrate the entire thermochemical process chain under real field conditions. The new solar mini-refinery is located on the roof of ETH's Machine Laboratory building in Zurich.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.06.2019
Genetic inequity towards endocrine disruptors
Genetic inequity towards endocrine disruptors
By identifying the genetic causes of susceptibility to endocrine disruptors, researchers from UNIGE and the HUG highlight a fundamental inequity towards the toxicity induced by these products that are found everywhere in our environment. Phthalates, one of the most common endocrine disruptors, are commonly used by industry in many plastic products - toys, clothing, baby bottles or even medical equipment - as well as in cosmetics.

Health - 13.06.2019
Three quarters of people living with axial spondyloarthritis struggle to find a job, IMAS survey shows
New European data from IMAS survey show that people living with axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) suffer a delay in diagnosis of over 7 years, potentially leading to an increase in work-related issues due to worsening disease burden   The experience of people living with axSpA, a long-term inflammatory spine condition as prevalent as rheumatoid arthritis , , needs to be better understood to help patients manage their disease    The Ankylosing Spon

Life Sciences - Environment - 13.06.2019
Neurotoxins damage aquatic organisms differently than expected
Neurotoxins damage aquatic organisms differently than expected
The insecticide imidacloprid is one of the strongest insect toxins and belongs to the group of neonicotinoids. Since 2019, the use of imidacloprid, along with two other substances in this group, is only allowed in greenhouses, as this substance is one of those responsible for the death of bees. Imidacloprid is also very toxic for aquatic organisms; as is stated in the manufacturer's certification reports.

Life Sciences - 12.06.2019
Reaching and Grasping - Learning fine motor coordination changes the brain
Reaching and Grasping - Learning fine motor coordination changes the brain
When we train the reaching for and grasping of objects, we also train our brain. In other words, this action brings about changes in the connections of a certain neuronal population in the red nucleus, a region of the midbrain. Researchers at the University of Basel's Biozentrum have discovered this group of nerve cells in the red nucleus.

Pharmacology - Chemistry - 11.06.2019
Learning from Nature's Bounty: New Libraries for Drug discovery
Learning from Nature’s Bounty: New Libraries for Drug discovery
Natural products, or their close derivatives, make some of our most potent medicines, among which macrocycles with their large carbon-rich ring systems are one class. The size and complexity of macrocycles has made it difficult to emulate and build on Nature's success in the laboratory.

Health - 11.06.2019
A new approach to modeling tumors
A new approach to modeling tumors
Researchers at EPFL and the University of Lyon have developed a device for creating cell aggregates in a fully controlled manner. Their aim is to model tumors more accurately in order to test potential new treatments.  When researchers develop new therapies, such as for cancer, they need to be able to test them on models that closely resemble human tissue.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.06.2019
The cholera bacterium's 3-in-1 toolkit for life in the ocean
The cholera bacterium's 3-in-1 toolkit for life in the ocean
The cholera bacterium uses a grappling hook-like appendage to take up DNA, bind to nutritious surfaces and recognise 'family' members, EPFL scientists have found. These discoveries will advance our understanding of how the bacterium that causes cholera adapts and survives in its natural environment.

Life Sciences - Physics - 10.06.2019
New method reveals principles of chromatin folding in vivo
New method reveals principles of chromatin folding in vivo
Characterizing chromosome structure is fundamental to a better understanding of gene expression. Current experimental methods helped to build mechanistic models of chromosome folding, however they could not be formally validated so far by independent techniques. This is what the Giorgetti group just did - thanks to a new method they developed to measure chromosome structure quantitatively in living cells.

Life Sciences - 07.06.2019
When social interaction helps you choose your food
When social interaction helps you choose your food
By deciphering the neural mechanisms involved in food consumption, UNIGE scientists demonstrate the importance of social interactions when choosing food and, more broadly, when adapting to the environment. How do we choose our food? By studying the neurobiological mechanisms involved in food choices of rodents, neuroscientists at the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, have identified the important and lasting influence that peers can have on eating habits.

Music - 06.06.2019
Decoding Beethoven's music style using data science
Decoding Beethoven's music style using data science
What makes Beethoven sound like Beethoven? EPFL researchers have completed a first analysis of Beethoven's writing style, applying statistical techniques to unlock recurring patterns. EPFL researchers are investigating Beethoven's composition style and they are using statistical techniques to quantify and explore the patterns that characterize musical structures in the Western classical tradition.

Environment - Innovation / Technology - 06.06.2019
Four Scientific Institutions will Monitor Switzerland from Space
Four Scientific Institutions will Monitor Switzerland from Space
The Swiss Data Cube (SDC) is an innovative technology that gathers all available satellite images from the American Landsat program and the European Sentinel 1 and 2. UNEP/GRID-Geneva, the University of Geneva (UNIGE), the University of Zurich (UZH) and the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research (WSL) have entered a new cooperation agreement to foster the use of Earth Observation data for environmental monitoring at national scale.

Life Sciences - Health - 05.06.2019
"Goldilocks" neurons promote REM sleep
It has been a mystery why REM sleep, or dream sleep, increases when the room temperature is "just right". Neuroscientists from Bern show that melanin-concentrating hormone neurons within the hypothalamus increase REM sleep when the need for body temperature defense is minimized, such as when sleeping in a warm and comfortable room temperature.