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Results 61 - 80 of 375.


Life Sciences - Health - 19.08.2019
Smart interaction between proteins
Smart interaction between proteins
Very little was known till now about DNA repair by homologous recombination, which is fundamental for human health. Now an ETH research group has for the first time isolated and studied all the key proteins involved in this process, laying the foundation for investigating many diseases. Within our body, the process of cell division is constantly creating new cells to replace old or damaged ones.

Life Sciences - Environment - 16.08.2019
Humans May Have Had Key Role in Cave Bear Extinction
Humans May Have Had Key Role in Cave Bear Extinction
Humans may have played a substantial role in the extinction of the European cave bear at the end of the last ice age. These findings of a study with the involvement of the University of Zurich suggest a drastic cave bear population decline starting around 40,000 years ago. Where in Europe did different populations of cave bears live and how they did they migrate during the Late Pleistocene? This is the topic that Verena Schünemann from the Institute of Evolutionary Medicine at the University of Zurich and a team of researchers investigated.

Health - Environment - 15.08.2019
Heatwaves Increase Emergency Admissions to Swiss Hospitals
Heatwaves Increase Emergency Admissions to Swiss Hospitals
Numerous studies have shown that heat increases mortality rates. 1,2 In Switzerland, for example, the hot summer of 2015 caused around 800 additional deaths. 3 Only a few studies, however, have investigated the effects of heatwaves on morbidity and hospital admissions. Researchers from the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) recently conducted a detailed analysis of emergency hospital admissions in Switzerland during the three heatwaves between June and August 2015 in a study commissioned by the Federal Office for the Environment (FOEN).

Computer Science / Telecom - Microtechnics - 14.08.2019
A miniature stretchable pump for the next generation of soft robots
A miniature stretchable pump for the next generation of soft robots
Scientists at EPFL have developed a tiny pump that could play a big role in the development of autonomous soft robots, lightweight exoskeletons and smart clothing. Flexible, silent and weighing only one gram, it is poised to replace the rigid, noisy and bulky pumps currently used. The scientists' work has just been published in Nature.

Life Sciences - 14.08.2019
Revolutionising the CRISPR method
Revolutionising the CRISPR method
Researchers at ETH Zurich have refined the famous CRISPR-Cas method. Now, for the very first time, it is possible to modify dozens, if not hundreds, of genes in a cell simultaneously. Everyone's talking about CRISPR-Cas. This biotechnological method offers a relatively quick and easy way to manipulate single genes in cells, meaning they can be precisely deleted, replaced or modified.

Earth Sciences - Computer Science / Telecom - 13.08.2019
Monitoring the Matterhorn with millions of data points
Monitoring the Matterhorn with millions of data points
A unique project is linking in-situ measurements with natural hazards research. For the past ten years, a network of wireless sensors on the Matterhorn's Hörnli ridge has been constantly streaming measurement data on the condition of steep rock faces, permafrost and prevailing climate. The project leader, Jan Beutel, reviews progress to date.

Life Sciences - 13.08.2019
How our biological clocks are locked in sync
Scientists from EPFL's Institute of Bioengineering have discovered that our circadian clock and our cell-cycle are in fact, synchronized. Nothing in biology is static; everything is fluid, dynamic and ever-moving. Often, this movement occurs in repeating patterns - regular, measurable cycles that tick just like "clocks".

Computer Science / Telecom - 09.08.2019
An algorithm to detect outside influences on the media
An algorithm to detect outside influences on the media
EPFL researchers recently developed an algorithm that maps out the media landscape and reveals biases and hidden influences in the news industry. News consumers may not be aware that the way their local media outlet selects and presents news stories can be affected by the media group that owns it. At a time of rampant disinformation, it is just this sort of outside influence on the media that people should know about.

Microtechnics - 08.08.2019
The world's smallest stent
The world’s smallest stent
Researchers at ETH Zurich have developed a new method for producing malleable microstructures ' for instance, vascular stents that are 40 times smaller than previously possible. In the future, such stents could be used to help to widen life-threatening constrictions of the urinary tract in foetuses in the womb.

Health - Pharmacology - 07.08.2019
Tiny biodegradable circuits for releasing painkillers inside the body
Tiny biodegradable circuits for releasing painkillers inside the body
EPFL researchers have developed biodegradable microresonators that can be heated locally with a wireless system. Doctors could soon be using them in implants to control the release of painkillers within tissue. Patients fitted with an orthopedic prosthetic commonly experience a period of intense pain after surgery.

Health - 06.08.2019
Malaria Mortality in Africa May Be Higher than Estimated
Malaria Mortality in Africa May Be Higher than Estimated
Previous studies analysing malaria mortality in sub-Saharan Africa may have underestimated the burden caused by this mosquito-borne disease. A study by Swiss TPH researchers found that when taking into account indirect causes of death such as anaemia, the risk of death from malaria was up to 3.5 times higher.

Pharmacology - Health - 05.08.2019
Future clinical studies in lymphoma patients
At the Institute of Oncology Research (IOR, affiliated to USI), researchers have discovered two molecules, so far known in the field of treatments against Ewing's sarcoma, which have strong antilymphoma activity, thus proposing clinical studies on patients. The study has been published in the scientific journal Clinical Cancer Research .

Life Sciences - Health - 05.08.2019
Unlocking the secrets of an important regulator of human development
Unlocking the secrets of an important regulator of human development
The protein TRIM71 is an important regulator of animal development and plays a role in various diseases. In close collaboration, scientists from the groups of Helge Grosshans and Marc Bühler at the FMI elucidated the mechanism by which TRIM71 binds and turns off its RNA targets. They also identified several core targets of TRIM71, including proteins involved in genetic disorders.

Health - Innovation / Technology - 05.08.2019
Using algorithms to track down cancer
Using algorithms to track down cancer
Modern medicine is looking for markers that provide early warning of complex diseases. In its quest to discover these 'biomarkers', the ETH spinoff Scailyte has developed software capable of analysing millions of single cells very efficiently. The search for biomarkers is currently one of the biggest challenges of modern medicine.

Materials Science - Computer Science / Telecom - 29.07.2019
Digitizing and replicating the world of materials
A team of EPFL researchers has set itself the lofty goal of building the biggest-ever database that digitizes the visual appearance of all natural and synthetic materials in the world.

Chemistry - Environment - 29.07.2019
A catalyst for sustainable methanol
A catalyst for sustainable methanol
Scientists at ETH Zurich and oil and gas company Total have developed a new catalyst that converts CO2 and hydrogen into methanol. Offering realistic market potential, the technology paves the way for the sustainable production of fuels and chemicals. The global economy still relies on the fossil carbon sources of petroleum, natural gas and coal, not just to produce fuel, but also as a raw material used by the chemical industry to manufacture plastics and countless other chemical compounds.

Environment - Materials Science - 29.07.2019
Unravelling corrosion
Unravelling corrosion
ETH researchers have succeeded in elucidating how and at what rate steel corrodes in a variety of porous materials. Their findings help enable the breakthrough of new, environmentally friendly types of cement. The rate at which steel corrodes in concrete or other porous materials is crucial to a large number of technological applications, such as underground pipelines or steel-reinforced concrete bridges.

Environment - 26.07.2019
Next-gen membranes for carbon capture
Next-gen membranes for carbon capture
EPFL chemical engineers have developed a new class of high-performance membranes for carbon capture that greatly exceed current targets. A major greenhouse gas, CO2 produced from burning fossil fuels is still mostly released into the atmosphere, adding to the burden of global warming. One way to cut down on it is through a carbon capture: a chemical technique that removes CO2 out of emissions ("postcombustion"), preventing it from entering the atmosphere.

Physics - Life Sciences - 26.07.2019
Listening to the whispers of individual cells
Listening to the whispers of individual cells
A new method developed by biophysicists at ETH Zurich has made it possible for the first time to detect and analyse signals between individual cells. For the cells in our bodies to function as a unit, they must communicate with one another constantly. They secrete signalling molecules ' ions, proteins and nucleic acids ' that are picked up by adjacent cells, which in turn pass on the signal to other cells.

Life Sciences - 25.07.2019
Hidden Genetic Variations Power Evolutionary Leaps
Laboratory populations that quietly amass "cryptic" genetic variants are capable of surprising evolutionary leaps, according to a paper in the July 26 issue of Science. A better understanding of cryptic variation may improve directed evolution techniques for developing new biomolecules for medical and other applications.