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Results 81 - 100 of 375.


Life Sciences - 25.07.2019
How neuromuscular connections are maintained after nerve lesions
How neuromuscular connections are maintained after nerve lesions
After nerve injury, the protein complex mTORC1 takes over an important function in skeletal muscle to maintain the neuromuscular junction, the synapse between the nerve and muscle fiber. Reserchers at the University of Basel's Biozentrum have now shown that the activation of mTORC1 must be tightly balanced for a proper response of the muscle to nerve injury.

Life Sciences - Sport - 25.07.2019
One or the other: Why strength training might come at the expense of endurance muscles
One or the other: Why strength training might come at the expense of endurance muscles
The neurotransmitter brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) acts in the muscle, so that during strength training endurance muscle fiber number is decreased. Researchers at the University of Basel's Biozentrum have more closely investigated this factor, from the group of myokines, and demonstrated that it is produced by the muscle and acts on both muscles and synapses.

Environment - History / Archeology - 24.07.2019
The climate is warming faster than it has in the last 2,000 years
The climate is warming faster than it has in the last 2,000 years
In contrast to pre-industrial climate fluctuations, current, anthropogenic climate change is occurring across the whole world at the same time. In addition, the speed of global warming is higher than it has been in at least 2,000 years. That's according to two studies from the University of Bern. Many people have a clear picture of the "Little Ice Age" (from approx. 1300 to 1850).

Environment - Earth Sciences - 24.07.2019
Volcanoes shaped the climate before humankind
Volcanoes shaped the climate before humankind
Five large volcanic eruptions occurred in the early 19th century. They caused cooling and - as a study led by the University of Bern shows - to drying in the monsoon regions and glaciers growing in the Alps. The study shows that the pre-industrial climate was not constant: if one takes this cold period as the starting point for current global warming, the climate has already warmed up more than assumed in the current discussions.

Chemistry - Physics - 23.07.2019
Adding a polymer stabilizes collapsing metal-organic frameworks
Adding a polymer stabilizes collapsing metal-organic frameworks
Porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have many applications like carbon capture and water-cleaning. However, MOFs with large pores tend to collapse. Chemists and chemical engineers at EPFL have now solved the problem by adding small amounts of a polymer into the MOF pores, an act that impedes pore collapse.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.07.2019
Fingerprint of Multiple Sclerosis Immune Cells Identified
In multiple sclerosis (MS), dysregulated immune cells periodically infiltrate the brain of afflicted patients, causing damages to neural transmission and neuronal loss. If not properly monitored and treated, the disease leads to accumulating disabilities that ultimately greatly restrict the daily life of patients.

Physics - Materials Science - 19.07.2019
Better thermal conductivity by adjusting the arrangement of atoms
Better thermal conductivity by adjusting the arrangement of atoms
Adjusting the thermal conductivity of materials is one of the challenges nanoscience is currently facing. Together with colleagues from the Netherlands and Spain, researchers from the University of Basel have shown that the atomic vibrations that determine heat generation in nanowires can be controlled through the arrangement of atoms alone.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.07.2019
Leukemia: how cancer stem cells suppress a danger detector
Leukemia: how cancer stem cells suppress a danger detector
Acute myeloid leukemia stem cells elude the body's immune cells by deactivating a danger detector. The underlying mechanisms and the potential new therapeutic approaches that this gives rise to have been detailed by researchers from the University of Basel and University Hospital Basel in collaboration with colleagues in Germany.

Health - Career - 17.07.2019
Four new professorships to drive forward diabetes research in Bern
Four new professorships to drive forward diabetes research in Bern
The University of Bern and the Diabetes Center Berne (DCB) are together creating four professorships in the field of diabetes technology research and development. This will boost the international profile of diabetes research in Bern and strengthen its role as a center of medicine in the long term. The four professorships are to be financed with 417,000 Swiss francs per annum each over a period of 12 years.

Life Sciences - 17.07.2019
Scientists model the flight of dandelion seeds
EPFL scientists, working in association with colleagues at the University of Twente and the University of Pisa, have studied the link between the number of bristles on dandelion seeds and the ability of those seeds to travel long distances in a stable manner.  Humans went to great lengths to design airplanes that can fly stably at cruising speed.

Music - Life Sciences - 17.07.2019
How the brain distinguishes between voice and sound
How the brain distinguishes between voice and sound
Researchers at UNIGE and at Maastricht University have demonstrated that the brain adapts to a person's listening intentions by focusing either on a speaker's voice or on the speech sounds that are being uttered.

Health - 16.07.2019
Are fertility apps useful?
Are fertility apps useful?
Researchers at EPFL and Stanford have carried out an analysis of the largest datasets from fertility awareness apps. Analyzing data from 200,000 users of the apps Sympto and Kindara, they have been able to make population-level observations regarding user demographics, tracking behavior patterns and accuracy in measuring menstrual health and ovulation.

Life Sciences - 16.07.2019
Automated microscope gives a look inside live cell populations
Automated microscope gives a look inside live cell populations
From now on scientists can look at how living cells function and react under various experimental conditions, in parallel and throughout a the cell's lifetime. With the new 3D microscope unveiled today by EPFL spin-off Nanolive, researchers can observe the details of how cells operate - all the way down to their organelles.

Environment - 15.07.2019
A new technique to concentrate a fertilizer produced from wastewater
A new technique to concentrate a fertilizer produced from wastewater
Two EPFL Master's in Environmental Engineering students have developed a novel method for recovering nitrogen from wastewater. For their semester project, they adapted a system typically used to concentrate fruit juice and tested it out at the Yverdon-les-Bains wastewater treatment plant in Vaud.  For their semester project, Océane Hames and Lucas Ott, two Master's students in Environmental Engineering at EPFL, chose to focus on the Yverdon-les-Bains wastewater treatment plant.

Physics - 12.07.2019
Weyl fermions discovered in another class of materials
A particular kind of elementary particle, the Weyl fermions, were first discovered a few years ago. Their specialty: They move through a material in a well ordered manner that practically never lets them collide with each other and is thus very energy efficient. This implies intriguing possibilities for the electronics of the future.

Microtechnics - Innovation / Technology - 12.07.2019
New dual-propeller drone can fly twice as long
New dual-propeller drone can fly twice as long
EPFL startup Flybotix has developed a novel drone with just two propellers and an advanced stabilization system that allow it to fly for twice as long as conventional models.

Life Sciences - 12.07.2019
Speed controllers for protein production
Speed controllers for protein production
The translation of the genetic code into proteins is a vital process in any cell. Researchers from the University of Basel have now uncovered important factors that influence the speed of protein synthesis in the cell. The results, recently published in "PNAS", serve as a basis to better analyze translational control in a wide range of cell types.

Environment - Materials Science - 12.07.2019
5000 tons of plastic released into the environment every year
5000 tons of plastic released into the environment every year
In order to estimate for the first time the exact extent of plastic pollution in Switzerland, the Federal Office for the Environment (FOEN) has mandated Empa researchers to calculate how much plastic gets into the environment. Empa has analyzed the seven most frequently used types of plastic. According to the study, more than 5000 tons of plastic are discharged into the environment every year.

Life Sciences - Computer Science / Telecom - 12.07.2019
The way a single neuron processes information is never the same
The way a single neuron processes information is never the same
How do neurons process information? Neurons are known to break down an incoming electrical signal into sub-units. Now, researchers at Blue Brain have discovered that dendrites, the neuron's tree-like receptors, work together - dynamically and depending on the workload - for learning. The findings further our understanding of how we think and may inspire new algorithms for artificial intelligence.

Health - 11.07.2019
Scientists map high-risk areas for Hepatitis E
Scientists map high-risk areas for Hepatitis E
A team of scientists from EPFL has compiled environmental and epidemiological data from around the world to develop a map that shows the riskiest areas for Hepatitis E outbreaks. Their work, published in Scientific Reports, opens the way to new avenues of research and prevention. EPFL scientists have created the first world map of regions with the highest prevalence of the hepatitis E virus (HEV).