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Materials Science - Health - 22.11.2019
Protection for pacemakers
Protection for pacemakers
A protective membrane for cardiac pacemakers developed at ETH Zurich has proved successful in animal trials in reducing the undesirable build-up of fibrotic tissue around the implant. The next step is to test the protective membrane in patients. ETH scientists have developed a special protective membrane made of cellulose that significantly reduces the build-up of fibrotic tissue around cardiac pacemaker implants, as reported in the current issue of the journal Biomaterials.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.11.2019
A new pathway to
A new pathway to "reprogram" killer cells
Killer cells of the immune system detect and kill infected cells or cancer cells. Researchers at the Institute of Pathology at the University of Bern have now discovered that the mechanism by which certain immune cells kill their target cells can also be used to control the killer cells themselves. This finding may be relevant to cancer immunotherapy.

Health - Environment - 15.11.2019
During epidemics, access to GPS data from smartphones can be crucial
During epidemics, access to GPS data from smartphones can be crucial
A new EPFL and MIT study into the interplay between mobility and the 2013 and 2014 dengue outbreaks in Singapore has uncovered a legal void around access to mobile phone data - information that can prove vital in preventing the spread of infectious diseases.á Researchers from EPFL and MIT have shown that human mobility is a major factor in the spread of vector-borne diseases such as malaria and dengue even over short intra-city distances.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.11.2019
Breakthrough in malaria research
Breakthrough in malaria research
An international scientific consortium led by the cell biologists Volker Heussler from the University of Bern and Oliver Billker from the Umeň University in Sweden has for the first time systematically investigated the genome of the malaria parasite Plasmodium throughout its life cycle in a large-scale experiment.

Health - 14.11.2019
Place of residence and sodas, an explosive cocktail
In a groundbreaking study published today, scientists used precision geospatial analysis techniques to show that obesity and the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) are more prevalent in some parts of Geneva than others.áThe study, a collaboration between HUG, EPFL, UNIGE and CHUV, is the first of its kind to establish a link between place of residence, SSB consumption and high body mass index (BMI).

Life Sciences - Health - 13.11.2019
Amoebas to replace laboratory mice
Amoebas to replace laboratory mice
The University of Geneva awards its 3R Prize to research that reduces the number of animals in experimentation through better selection of the compounds to be tested. Minimize the number of anti-infective compounds to be tested in an animal model by first selecting them on infected amoebas to retain only the most effective ones.

Social Sciences - Health - 11.11.2019
Aging in good health: the inequalities are widening
Aging in good health: the inequalities are widening
UNIGE researchers have been analysing the rise in healthy life expectancy in Switzerland since 1990 and measuring the differences based on an individual's level of education. Life expectancy in Switzerland has been growing steadily for decades. But have these additional years been spent in good health or, on the contrary, do they only prolong the ills of an aging population?

Health - Pharmacology - 06.11.2019
"Super-grafts" that could treat diabetes
By successfully strengthening pancreatic islets before transplantation, researchers at UNIGE and HUG are hoping for a significant improvement in the success of cell transplants in patients with severe diabetes. To save patients with a severe form of type 1 diabetes (characterized by the absence of functional insulin-producing cells), pancreatic cell transplantation is sometimes the last resort.

Health - Life Sciences - 04.11.2019
Synthetic phages with programmable specificity
Synthetic phages with programmable specificity
ETH researchers are using synthetic biology to reprogram bacterial viruses - commonly known as bacteriophages - to expand their natural host range. This technology paves the way for the therapeutic use of standardized, synthetic bacteriophages to treat bacterial infections. Bacteriophages ("phages" for short) are viruses that infect bacteria.

Health - Pharmacology - 31.10.2019
Removing liver tumors safely, noninvasively and efficiently
Removing liver tumors safely, noninvasively and efficiently
Many liver tumors have long been difficult or impossible to remove. Since 2015, however, it has been possible to treat these tumors by combining noninvasive surgical techniques, radiological imaging and a navigation system. For the first time, a new study by University of Bern and Inselspital, Berne University Hospital has impressively demonstrated the success of this technique.

Life Sciences - Health - 31.10.2019
Milk from Teeth: Dental Stem Cells Can Generate Milk-Producing Cells
Milk from Teeth: Dental Stem Cells Can Generate Milk-Producing Cells
Stem cells of the teeth can contribute to the regeneration of non-dental organs, namely mammary glands. According to a new study from researchers at the University of Zurich, dental epithelial stem cells from mice can generate mammary ducts and even milk-producing cells when transplanted into mammary glands.

Life Sciences - Health - 31.10.2019
Analyzing gut bacteria more accurately
The microorganisms in our intestines could be linked to certain diseases such as Alzheimer's and diabetes. Researchers from the AD-gut consortium have developed a novel method - combining optical DNA mapping and statistics - for accurately distinguishing and rapidly identifying the various species in the microbiota.

Life Sciences - Health - 31.10.2019
With a new Artificial Intelligence method, humans and machines can analyse complex biomedical data
An interdisciplinary team of researchers from the USI Institute of Computational Sciences (ICS), and the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB), affiliated to USI, have developed a new Artificial Intelligence method that enables the analysis of complex biomedical data. The results of the research have been published in the renowned scientific journal Science advances .

Life Sciences - Health - 31.10.2019
Analyzing gut bacteria more accurately to make diagnosis
The microorganisms in our intestines could be linked to certain diseases such as Alzheimer's and diabetes. Researchers from the AD-gut consortium have developed a novel method - combining optical DNA mapping and statistics - for accurately distinguishing and rapidly identifying the various species in the microbiota.

Health - Mathematics - 29.10.2019
Could mathematics help to better treat cancer?
Could mathematics help to better treat cancer?
Using the information theory, researchers at UNIGE aim to better understand the cancerous development of cells through a mathematical approach and propose innovative therapeutic strategies. The development and survival of living beings are linked to the ability of their cells to perceive and respond correctly to their environment.

Environment - Health - 24.10.2019
The Effects of the Scorching Summer of 2018 on Health
The Effects of the Scorching Summer of 2018 on Health
The Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) analysed the health consequences of the hot and dry summer of 2018 for the Federal Office for the Environment (FOEN). The results were published today in the report "Heat and Drought in Summer 2018 - Effects on Humans and the Environment". The report shows that heat and drought had negative impacts on human health, forests, agriculture, water and glaciers.

Life Sciences - Health - 24.10.2019
Bacteria must be
Bacteria must be "stressed out" to divide
Bacterial cell division is controlled by both enzymatic activity and mechanical forces, which work together to control its timing and location, a new study from EPFL finds. A new study from EPFL scientists has found that bacteria use mechanical forces to divide, along with biological factors. The research, led by the groups of John McKinney and Georg Fantner at EPFL, came after recent studies suggested that bacterial division is not only governed by biology, but also by physics.

Health - Life Sciences - 23.10.2019
Special cells contribute to regenerate the heart in Zebrafish
Special cells contribute to regenerate the heart in Zebrafish
It is already known that zebrafish can flexibly regenerate their hearts after injury. An international research group led by Prof. Nadia Mercader of the University of Bern now shows that certain heart muscle cells play a central role in this process. The insights gained could be used to initiate a similar repair process in the human heart.

Health - Materials Science - 23.10.2019
Monitoring the corrosion of bioresorbable magnesium
Monitoring the corrosion of bioresorbable magnesium
ETH researchers have recently been able to monitor the corrosion of bioresorbable magnesium alloys at the nanoscale over a time scale of a few seconds to many hours. This is an important step towards accurately predicting how fast implants are resorbed by the body to enable the development of tailored materials for temporary implant applications.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.10.2019
Protein in Blood Protects against Neuronal Damage after Brain Hemorrhage
Protein in Blood Protects against Neuronal Damage after Brain Hemorrhage
Patients who survive a cerebral hemorrhage may suffer delayed severe brain damage caused by free hemoglobin, which comes from red blood cells and damages neurons. Researchers at the University of Zurich and the UniversityHospital Zurich have now discovered a protective protein in the body called haptoglobin, which prevents this effect.
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