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Results 1 - 20 of 33.


Health - Life Sciences - 18.03.2019
New Potential Approach to Treat Atopic Dermatitis
How does the immune system respond to fungi on our skin? Researchers at the University of Zurich have demonstrated that the same immune cells that protect us against skin fungi also encourage the inflammatory symptoms of atopic dermatitis. An antibody therapy could alleviate this chronic inflammatory skin disease.

Health - Pharmacology - 13.03.2019
Stress hormones promote breast cancer metastasis
It has long been thought that stress contributes to cancer progression. Scientists from the University of Basel and the University Hospital of Basel have deciphered the molecular mechanisms linking breast cancer metastasis with increased stress hormones. In addition, they found that synthetic derivatives of stress hormones, which are frequently used as anti-inflammatory in cancer therapy, decrease the efficacy of chemotherapy.

Health - 12.03.2019
Vaccine developed to treat osteoarthritic pain
Vaccine developed to treat osteoarthritic pain
Researchers from the Universities of Bern and Oxford have developed a vaccine that blocks the effects of the main cause of pain in osteoarthritis (OA) - nerve growth factor (NGF) - in mice. In a collaborative effort between the Jenner Institute and the Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology at the University of Oxford, with colleagues in the University of Bern, and the Latvian Biomedical Research & Study Centre, scientists have developed and tested a vaccine that could be used to treat chronic pain caused by osteoarthritis, by blocking the cause of the pain - NGF.

Health - Life Sciences - 07.03.2019
Vitamin B3 analogue boosts production of blood cells
Scientists from EPFL and the UNIL/Ludwig Cancer Research have found that supplementing diet with nicotinamide riboside, an analogue of vitamin B3, boosts the production of blood cells by improving the function of their stem cells. This can help overcome problems in stem cell-based therapies that treat leukemia and aggressive lymphomas.  Stem cell-based therapies are becoming more and more common, especially in the treatment of blood cancers like lymphoma and leukemia.

Pharmacology - Health - 04.03.2019
Novartis data confirm rapid response and high efficacy of Cosentyx in psoriasis patients for first time in China
Phase III study shows close to 9/10 patients who received Cosentyx 300mg achieved clear or almost clear skin during the first 16 weeks of treatment (87%), with rapid onset of relief seen as early as week 3   Results strengthen unique position of Cosentyx as a rapid and long-lasting complete treatment of psoriatic disease, with over 200,000 patients treated worldwide   Data is being presented at the 2019 American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) Annu

Health - Psychology - 28.02.2019
Psychiatry: case notes indicate impending seclusion
Psychiatry: case notes indicate impending seclusion
Using notes made by the attending healthcare professionals about psychiatric patients enables impending coercive measures to be predicted in advance - potentially even through automated text analysis. This was reported by researchers from the University of Basel and the Psychiatric University Clinics Basel in the journal Frontiers in Psychiatry.

Life Sciences - Health - 27.02.2019
A gentle method for unlocking the mysteries of the deep brain
A gentle method for unlocking the mysteries of the deep brain
Researchers at UNIGE have successfully demonstrated that electroencephalography can be used to accurately study activity in the deep areas of the brain. The way is now open to understanding how these regions  interact with other parts of the brain for developing appropriate treatments following dysfunction.

Life Sciences - Health - 26.02.2019
Oncogenic risk arising from the loss of repeat silencing
Oncogenic risk arising from the loss of repeat silencing
The heterochromatin of eukaryotes contains repetitive DNA, which can lead to genome instability when transcribed. These sequences are normally silenced through the methylation of lysine 9 in histone H3 (H3K9me). Researchers from the Gasser group explored the role and importance of H3K9me. In two recent publications, they shed light on how the process is regulated and how loss of H3K9me renders cells sensitive to the loss of the breast tumor suppressor, BRCA1.

Health - Life Sciences - 26.02.2019
CRISPR reveals the secret life of antimicrobial peptides
CRISPR reveals the secret life of antimicrobial peptides
Using CRISPR, scientists at EPFL have carried out extensive work on a little-known yet effective weapon of the innate immune system, antimicrobial peptides. When it comes to the immune system, we usually think about lymphocytes like B and T cells or macrophages going on constant seek-and-destroy missions against invading pathogens like bacteria and viruses.

Health - Life Sciences - 25.02.2019
Neanderthals Walked Upright just like the Humans of Today
Neanderthals Walked Upright just like the Humans of Today
Neanderthals are often depicted as having straight spines and poor posture. However, these prehistoric humans were more similar to us than many assume. University of Zurich researchers have shown that Neanderthals walked upright just like modern humans ' thanks to a virtual reconstruction of the pelvis and spine of a very well-preserved Neanderthal skeleton found in France.

Life Sciences - Health - 25.02.2019
Bacteria walk (a bit) like we do
Bacteria walk (a bit) like we do
EPFL biophysicists have been able to directly study the way bacteria move on surfaces, revealing a molecular machinery reminiscent of motor reflexes. Do bacteria control their "walks" like we do? It might sound strange, but it's a fundamental question. Understanding bacteria motility would not only expand our understanding of their behavior, but would also help us fight certain aggressive pathogens.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.02.2019
Why a blow to the chest can kill or save you
Why a blow to the chest can kill or save you
It is still a mystery why a blow to the chest can kill some people yet save others. We may be one step closer to an answer, however, thanks to a device developed by researchers at EPFL and the University of Bern that can replicate the experience in the laboratory. A blow to the chest can have highly contrasting effects.

Health - Life Sciences - 21.02.2019
Bat Influenza Viruses Could Infect Humans
Bat Influenza Viruses Could Infect Humans
Bats don't only carry the deadly Ebola virus, but are also a reservoir for a new type of influenza virus. These newly discovered flu viruses could potentially also attack the cells of humans and livestock, researchers at the University of Zurich have now shown. Seasonal outbreaks of the flu are caused by influenza viruses that can only infect people.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 18.02.2019
EPFL promotes personalized nutrition with Food & You
EPFL promotes personalized nutrition with Food & You
EPFL's Digital Epidemiology Laboratory has launched Food & You - one of Switzerland's first citizen science initiatives on personalized nutrition. The study aims to create a digital cohort that will help scientists develop nutritional guidelines that can be personalized to specific individuals. Several studies over the past few years have shown that what constitutes a healthy diet for an individual depends to some extent on his or her physiology and lifestyle.

Health - 15.02.2019
Introduction of flat-rate payments accompanied by an increase in readmission rates
Introduction of flat-rate payments accompanied by an increase in readmission rates
Seven years after the introduction of flat-rate payments at Swiss hospitals, a major study has revealed a slight increase in readmission rates. Researchers from the University of Basel and the Cantonal Hospital of Aarau reported the findings in the journal JAMA Network Open. In January 2012, a flat-rate payment structure for inpatient hospital services was introduced across Switzerland in the form of the Swiss Diagnosis Related Groups (SwissDRG).

Health - Life Sciences - 13.02.2019
Diabetes: human cells can also change jobs
Diabetes: human cells can also change jobs
UNIGE researchers demonstrate the ease of some human pancreatic cells to make insulin. In diabetes, this type of cell conversion could compensate for the loss or dysfunction of cells that naturally produce this hormone. A world first. Biology textbooks teach us that adult cell types remain fixed in the identity they have acquired upon differentiation.

Health - Pharmacology - 08.02.2019
Drug-resistant tuberculosis: high mortality rate due to inaccurate tests
Drug-resistant tuberculosis: high mortality rate due to inaccurate tests
Inaccurate tests carried out on tuberculosis patients in developing countries often fail to reliably detect resistance to drugs, leading to incorrect treatment and a higher mortality rate. These are the results of study by an international group of researchers led by a team at the University of Bern published today.

Health - Mechanical Engineering - 08.02.2019
Gummy-like robots could help prevent disease
Gummy-like robots could help prevent disease
EPFL scientists have developed microscopic, hydrogel-based muscles that can manipulate and mechanically stimulate biological tissue. These soft, biocompatible robots could be used for targeted therapy and to help diagnose and prevent disease. Human tissues experience a variety of mechanical stimuli that can affect their ability to carry out their physiological functions, such as protecting organs from injury.

Health - Social Sciences - 07.02.2019
Dying in Switzerland - a review of current developments
All of us die - but the question is how? Today we have a greater say in the way our lives end than ever before. Nevertheless, most people do not die where they would like to. The book "Das Lebensende in der Schweiz" (End of life in Switzerland) reflects on what is currently known about dying in Switzerland.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.02.2019
Escort service: The role of immune cells in the formation of metastases
Tumor cells use a certain type of immune cells, the so-called neutrophils, to enhance their ability to form metastases. Scientists have deciphered the mechanisms of this collaboration and found strategies for blocking them. This is reported by researchers from the University of Basel and the University Hospital of Basel in the scientific journal "Nature".