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Life Sciences - 20.09.2019
Why is the brain disturbed by harsh sounds?
Why is the brain disturbed by harsh sounds?
UNIGE researchers have demonstrated how the harsh sounds used in alarm systems hold the brain's attention by stimulating its aversion networks. Why do the harsh sounds emitted by alarms or human shrieks grab our attention? What is going on in the brain when it detects these frequencies' Neuroscientists from the University of Geneva (UNIGE) and Geneva University Hospitals (HUG), Switzerland, have been analysing how people react when they listen to a range of different sounds, the aim being to establish the extent to which repetitive sound frequencies are considered unpleasant.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.09.2019
Antimicrobial resistance is drastically rising
Antimicrobial resistance is drastically rising
An international team of researchers led by ETH has shown that antimicrobial-resistant infections are rapidly increasing in animals in low and middle income countries. They produced the first global of resistance rates, and identified regions where interventions are urgently needed. The world is experiencing unprecedented economic growth in lowand middle-income countries.

Life Sciences - Health - 18.09.2019
The path of breast-to-brain cancer metastasis
The path of breast-to-brain cancer metastasis
Scientists at EPFL's Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research and University of Bern have discovered a signaling pathway that breast tumors exploit to metastasize to the brain. In 2018, breast cancer was the most common cancer in women worldwide, accounting for about a quarter of all reported cancers.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.09.2019
The path of breast-to-brain cancer metastasis
The path of breast-to-brain cancer metastasis
Scientists at EPFL's Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research have discovered a signaling pathway that breast tumors exploit to metastasize to the brain. Image: Breast cancer cells (blue) associate with glutamate-secreting neurons (red) to stimulate NMDA receptor-mediated signaling (green) of tumor growth (STED super-resolution microscopy).  In 2018, breast cancer was the most common cancer in women worldwide, accounting for about a quarter of all reported cancers.

Life Sciences - Innovation / Technology - 16.09.2019
New microscopes to unravel the mysteries of brain organization
New microscopes to unravel the mysteries of brain organization
The secret of capturing exquisite brain images with a new generation of custom-built microscopes is revealed today . The new microscopes, known as mesoSPIMs, can image the minute detail of brain tissue down to individual neurons that are five times thinner than a human hair, and can uncover the 3D anatomy of entire small organs, faster than ever before.

Health - Life Sciences - 12.09.2019
Type 2 diabetes is not just about insulin
Type 2 diabetes is not just about insulin
By showing that the liver can produce glucose autonomously, researchers at UNIGE explain how type 2 diabetes can develop in overweight people even without insulin resistance. In Switzerland, more than 400,000 people suffer from type 2 diabetes, a serious metabolic disorder that is constantly increasing.

Life Sciences - 11.09.2019
Brain: How to optimize decision making?
Brain: How to optimize decision making?
UNIGE researchers demonstrate that our brains do not make decisions based on their inherent value but for what they offer above and beyond other possible propositions. Our brains are constantly faced with different choices: Should I have a chocolate éclair or macaroon? Should I take the bus or go by car? What should I wear: a woollen sweater or one made of cashmere? When the difference in quality between two choices is great, the choice is made very quickly.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.09.2019
Advanced breeding paves the way for disease-resistant beans
Advanced breeding paves the way for disease-resistant beans
ETH researchers are involved in the development and implementation of a method to efficiently breed for disease-resistant beans in different regions of the world. Their work will help to improve the livelihood and food security of smallholders in developing countries. For many people in Africa and Latin America, beans are an important staple.

Life Sciences - 10.09.2019
Chromatin looping: CTCF versus ADNP
Chromatin looping: CTCF versus ADNP
The organization of chromatin in the three-dimensional space is complex and requires the help of many proteins, including CTFC. Researchers from the group of Marc Bühler have identified a new player in the process: the transcription factor ADNP. In a recent study, they show that ADNP competes with CTFC, acting as a local modulator of chromatin looping.

Life Sciences - Health - 09.09.2019
Feeling legs again improves amputees’ health
Two volunteers are the first above-knee amputees in the world to feel their prosthetic foot and knee in real time. Their bionic prosthesis, which was developed by an international team of researchers, features sensors that connect to residual nerves in the thigh. The resulting neurofeedback greatly reduces physical and mental strain for users of the prosthesis.

Life Sciences - Health - 09.09.2019
The birth of vision, from the retina to the brain
The birth of vision, from the retina to the brain
By decoding the genetic mechanisms that control the neurons of the visual system, researchers at UNIGE are unveiling the first steps in the construction of vision, paving the way for regenerative eye medicine.

Life Sciences - 06.09.2019
Audition: How our brain filters sounds
Audition: How our brain filters sounds
Researchers at UNIGE have demonstrated that the brain adjusts the attention it gives to identical sounds as soon as they are perceived in the brainstem, a capacity that is lacking in schizophrenics. Our sound environment is extremely dense, which is why the brain has to adapt and implement filtering mechanisms that allow it to hold its attention on the most important elements and save energy.

Life Sciences - Health - 05.09.2019
Resistance can spread even without the use of antibiotics
Resistance can spread even without the use of antibiotics
Antibiotic resistance does not spread only where and when antibiotics are used in large quantities, ETH researchers conclude from laboratory experiments. Reducing antibiotic use alone is therefore not sufficient to curtail resistance, and should be done in conjunction with measures to prevent infection with resistant germs.

Life Sciences - Health - 29.08.2019
Preventing the onset of schizophrenia in mouse model
Preventing the onset of schizophrenia in mouse model
Although predisposing processes occur earlier, schizophrenia breaks out at young adulthood, suggesting it might involve a pathological transition during late brain development in predisposed individuals. Using a genetic mouse model of schizophrenia, researchers from the Caroni group at the FMI showed that, like in patients, characteristic network and cognitive deficits only emerge in adult mice.

Life Sciences - Health - 28.08.2019
Brain stem cells have a good memory
Brain stem cells have a good memory
By successfully rejuvenating brain progenitor cells, researchers at UNIGE reveal an unsuspected role of the environment in setting  cellular properties. The cerebral cortex acts as the control centre of our cognitive processes. During embryogenesis, dozens of types of neurons with distinct functions come together to form the circuits that drive our thoughts and actions.

Life Sciences - 22.08.2019
Brain finds order amidst chaos
Brain finds order amidst chaos
How does the brain find order amidst a sea of noise and chaos' Researchers at the EPFL Blue Brain Project have found the answer to this long-standing question by using advanced simulation techniques to investigate the way neurons talk to each other while submerged in a sea of noise and chaos. In a paper published , they found that by working as a team, cortical neurons can respond even to weak input against the backdrop of noise and chaos, allowing the brain to find order.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.08.2019
Optic nerve stimulation to aid the blind
Optic nerve stimulation to aid the blind
EPFL scientists are investigating new ways to provide visual signals to the blind by directly stimulating the optic nerve. Their preliminary study on animals uses a new type of neural electrode and provides distinct signals. Scientists from EPFL in Switzerland and Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna in Italy are developing technology for the blind that bypasses the eyeball entirely and sends messages to the brain.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.08.2019
When liver disease affects the brain
When liver disease affects the brain
Scientists have demonstrated how chronic liver diseases cause molecular changes in the brain. They carried out their research using the 9.4 Tesla high-magnetic-field MRI machine at the Center for Biomedical Imaging (CIBM) at EPFL. The liver plays a vital role as a filter in the human body.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.08.2019
When a diseased liver disrupts the brain
When a diseased liver disrupts the brain
Researchers from UNIGE, CHUV, EPFL, CIBM, HUG and UNIL have demonstrated how chronic liver diseases cause molecular changes in the brain. The liver plays a vital role as a filter in the human body.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.08.2019
Smart interaction between proteins
Smart interaction between proteins
Very little was known till now about DNA repair by homologous recombination, which is fundamental for human health. Now an ETH research group has for the first time isolated and studied all the key proteins involved in this process, laying the foundation for investigating many diseases. Within our body, the process of cell division is constantly creating new cells to replace old or damaged ones.
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