News 2019

« BACK

Life Sciences



Results 1 - 20 of 104.
1 2 3 4 5 6 Next »


Health - Life Sciences - 22.07.2019
Fingerprint of Multiple Sclerosis Immune Cells Identified
In multiple sclerosis (MS), dysregulated immune cells periodically infiltrate the brain of afflicted patients, causing damages to neural transmission and neuronal loss. If not properly monitored and treated, the disease leads to accumulating disabilities that ultimately greatly restrict the daily life of patients.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.07.2019
Leukemia: how cancer stem cells suppress a danger detector
Leukemia: how cancer stem cells suppress a danger detector
Acute myeloid leukemia stem cells elude the body's immune cells by deactivating a danger detector. The underlying mechanisms and the potential new therapeutic approaches that this gives rise to have been detailed by researchers from the University of Basel and University Hospital Basel in collaboration with colleagues in Germany.

Life Sciences - 17.07.2019
Scientists model the flight of dandelion seeds
EPFL scientists, working in association with colleagues at the University of Twente and the University of Pisa, have studied the link between the number of bristles on dandelion seeds and the ability of those seeds to travel long distances in a stable manner.  Humans went to great lengths to design airplanes that can fly stably at cruising speed.

Music - Life Sciences - 17.07.2019
How the brain distinguishes between voice and sound
How the brain distinguishes between voice and sound
Researchers at UNIGE and at Maastricht University have demonstrated that the brain adapts to a person's listening intentions by focusing either on a speaker's voice or on the speech sounds that are being uttered.

Life Sciences - 16.07.2019
Automated microscope gives a look inside live cell populations
Automated microscope gives a look inside live cell populations
From now on scientists can look at how living cells function and react under various experimental conditions, in parallel and throughout a the cell's lifetime. With the new 3D microscope unveiled today by EPFL spin-off Nanolive, researchers can observe the details of how cells operate - all the way down to their organelles.

Life Sciences - 12.07.2019
Speed controllers for protein production
Speed controllers for protein production
The translation of the genetic code into proteins is a vital process in any cell. Researchers from the University of Basel have now uncovered important factors that influence the speed of protein synthesis in the cell. The results, recently published in "PNAS", serve as a basis to better analyze translational control in a wide range of cell types.

Life Sciences - Computer Science / Telecom - 12.07.2019
The way a single neuron processes information is never the same
The way a single neuron processes information is never the same
How do neurons process information? Neurons are known to break down an incoming electrical signal into sub-units. Now, researchers at Blue Brain have discovered that dendrites, the neuron's tree-like receptors, work together - dynamically and depending on the workload - for learning. The findings further our understanding of how we think and may inspire new algorithms for artificial intelligence.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 11.07.2019
A novel perception mechanism regulating important plant processes
A novel perception mechanism regulating important plant processes
Similar to insulin in humans, plants also produce peptide hormones that orchestrate internal processes and responses, including growth, development, and immunity. One of them is RALF23, which belongs to the large family of RALF plant peptides. Notably, the study revealed a novel recognition mechanism for the RALF23 peptide signals by plant receptors.

Life Sciences - Innovation / Technology - 05.07.2019
Important Results For Brain Machine Interfaces
Important Results For Brain Machine Interfaces
Data from Mental Work project, conducted as an experimental artwork at EPFL's Artlab, indicates that BMI is robust and accessible to the general public, spurring new research collaborations in Switzerland on user experience.   Brain-machine interfaces are rarely found outside of medical clinics, where the disabled receive hours or days of training in order to operate wheelchairs with their minds.

Environment - Life Sciences - 03.07.2019
Influence in absentia
Influence in absentia
The preferred food of pike in shallow lakes in Denmark and Sweden is roach. Seven in ten fish found by researchers in the stomachs of pike were roach - and the numbers tended to be even higher in wintertime. The roach that pike ate in lakes with tributary or outflowing rivers were, admittedly, smaller during the winter, and became somewhat thinner as winter went on.

Health - Life Sciences - 01.07.2019
Neurotechnology holds promise for chronic stroke patients
Neurotechnology holds promise for chronic stroke patients
Personalized neurotechnology-aided rehabilitation of the arm could improve recovery in severe chronic stroke patients according to a new paper published today in the journal Brain.

Life Sciences - Health - 27.06.2019
Growing embryonic tissues on a chip
Growing embryonic tissues on a chip
Researchers at EPFL have developed a method to stimulate human stem cells to organize themselves into ordered layers of different cell types. Published , the method is based on microfluidics and can help better understand how tissues are formed in the embryo, setting the stage for fabricating functional tissues and organs for drug testing and transplantation.

Health - Life Sciences - 26.06.2019
Is multiple sclerosis linked to childhood viral infections?
Is multiple sclerosis linked to childhood viral infections?
UNIGE researchers have discovered a potential link between viral infections in the brain in childhood and the risk to develop auto-immune disease in adulthood. Although the exact causes of multiple sclerosis still remain unknown, it is assumed that the disease is triggered by a combination of genetic and environmental risk factors.

Health - Life Sciences - 26.06.2019
Neuronal Parkinson inclusions are different than expected
Neuronal Parkinson inclusions are different than expected
An international team of researchers involving members of the University of Basel's Biozentrum challenges the conventional understanding of the cause of Parkinson's disease. The researchers have shown that the inclusions in the brain's neurons, characteristic of Parkinson's disease, are comprised of a membranous medley rather than protein fibrils.

Life Sciences - 25.06.2019
How the Chlamydosaurus dragon got its frill
How the Chlamydosaurus dragon got its frill
Studying the developing embryo of the 'frilled dragon' lizard, UNIGE researchers reveal that physical forces, rather than a genetic program, generate the characteristic folds of its spectacular collar. The frilled dragon exhibits a distinctive large erectile ruff. This lizard usually keeps the frill folded back against its body but can spread it as a spectacular display to scare off predators.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 24.06.2019
New Therapy Promotes Vascular Repair Following Stroke
New Therapy Promotes Vascular Repair Following Stroke
Following a stroke, antibodies that inhibit the signaling molecule Nogo-A can help repair blood vessels in the affected brain regions. This also promotes the regaining of motor functions, researchers at the University of Zurich have shown in a mouse model. The study opens up new avenues for treatment.

Life Sciences - Health - 24.06.2019
Molecular scissors stabilise the cell's cytoskeleton
Molecular scissors stabilise the cell’s cytoskeleton
Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI in Villigen, Switzerland, have for the first time elucidated the structure of important enzymes in human cells that alter essential building blocks of the cellular cytoskeleton. This reveals the missing part of a cycle that regulates the build-up or breakdown of supporting elements of the cell.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.06.2019
One Third of Cambodians Infected with Threadworm
One Third of Cambodians Infected with Threadworm
Strongyloides stercoralis is a soil-transmitted threadworm that is endemic in many tropical and subtropical countries. In a nation-wide study in Cambodia, Swiss TPH scientists and their partners found that nearly a third of the population is infected with S. stercoralis. The results were published today in the peer-reviewed journal PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.06.2019
Cancer control: Structure of important transport protein solved
Cancer control: Structure of important transport protein solved
For the first time, Bernese researchers have been able to solve the structure of a transport protein and thus to describe the functional mechanism that plays a significant role in the survival of cancer cells. This is an important step towards developing effective inhibitors and fight tumor growth. Certain cancer cells depend on exporting the metabolite lactate, which accumulates during the generation on energy.

Environment - Life Sciences - 20.06.2019
Software to protect the world's most endangered species
Software to protect the world's most endangered species
By combining genetic and environmental databases, researchers at EPFL are seeking to help biologists identify more accurately the animal and plant species most exposed to climate change, in order to develop appropriate conservation methods. Northern Morocco is home to a type of sheep that has a specific gene, developed over thousands of years of evolution.
1 2 3 4 5 6 Next »