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Results 161 - 177 of 177.


Life Sciences - 06.02.2019
Morals versus Money: How We Make Social Decisions
Our actions are guided by moral values. However, monetary incentives can get in the way of our good intentions. Neuroeconomists at the University of Zurich have now investigated in which area of the brain conflicts between moral and material motives are resolved. Their findings reveal that our actions are more social when these deliberations are inhibited.

Life Sciences - 05.02.2019
Fine-tuning gene regulation by CG dinucleotides
Fine-tuning gene regulation by CG dinucleotides
Transcription of our genes mostly begins in regions of the genome called CpG islands. These are rich in the dinucleotide CpG (thus the name), critical for gene activity and devoid of DNA methylation. Despite the relevance of CpG islands, it is unclear if the CpG dinucleotide itself contributes to their activity.

Life Sciences - 31.01.2019
Learning new vocabulary during deep sleep
Learning new vocabulary during deep sleep
Researchers of the University of Bern, Switzerland, showed that we can acquire the vocabulary of a new language during distinct phases of slow-wave sleep and that the sleep-learned vocabulary could be retrieved unconsciously following waking. Memory formation appeared to be mediated by the same brain structures that also mediate wake vocabulary learning.

Life Sciences - Environment - 30.01.2019
A small fish provides insight into the genetic basis of evolution
A small fish provides insight into the genetic basis of evolution
A genetic analysis of sticklebacks shows that isolated populations in similar environments develop in comparable ways. The basis for this is already present in the genome of their genetic ancestors. Evolutionary biologists from the University of Basel and the University of Nottingham report these insights in the journal Evolution Letters.

Health - Life Sciences - 29.01.2019
Wheat Resistance Gene also Protects Corn and Barley against Fungal Disease
Wheat Resistance Gene also Protects Corn and Barley against Fungal Disease
Plant researchers at the University of Zurich have developed transgenic corn and barley lines with improved resistance against several fungal diseases thanks to the wheat resistance gene Lr34. Following successful tests in the greenhouse, the researchers are now planning to carry out field trials at the Agroscope site in Zurich-Reckenholz.

Health - Life Sciences - 28.01.2019
Cancer: A mutation that breaks gene interplay in 3D
Cancer: A mutation that breaks gene interplay in 3D
EPFL scientists have discovered how a mutated gene can affect the three-dimensional interactions of genes in the cell, leading to various forms of cancer. Inside the cell, DNA is tightly wrapped around proteins and packed in a complex, 3D structure that we call "chromatin". Chromatin not only protects our genetic material from damage, but also organizes the entire genome by regulating the expression of genes in three dimensions, unwinding them to be presented to the cell's gene-expression machinery and then winding them back in.

Life Sciences - Health - 28.01.2019
A solid scaffolding for our cells
A solid scaffolding for our cells
UNIGE researchers have discovered the fundamental role of the Not1 protein, which allows proteins to find each other and assemble at a precise pace, in the right place and at the right time. To perform properly the task for which they have been synthesized, proteins must first assemble to form effective cellular "machines".

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 28.01.2019
How do mRNAs deal with stress?
How do mRNAs deal with stress?
Two hallmarks of the integrated stress response of cells are the inhibition of translation and the formation of stress granules (SGs) and processing bodies (PBs). However, it is not well understood how both processes are coupled. In a study published in Molecular Cell, researchers from the Chao group applied single-molecule RNA imaging to study the interactions of mRNAs with SGs and PBs, and found out that the generally accepted assumptions about the function of granules need to be revised.

Health - Life Sciences - 21.01.2019
Discovery of bacterial signature of intestinal disease
Discovery of bacterial signature of intestinal disease
Researchers from the Department of Biomedical Research of the University of Bern and the University Clinic of Visceral Surgery and Medicine of the Inselspital Bern, Switzerland, have discovered that changes in the composition of the intestinal bacteria in patients with chronic inflammatory bowel disease affect the severity of the disease and the success of therapy.

Life Sciences - Computer Science / Telecom - 16.01.2019
A robot recreates the walk of a 300-million-year-old animal
A robot recreates the walk of a 300-million-year-old animal
Using the fossil and fossilized footprints of a 300-million-year-old animal, an interdisciplinary team that includes scientists from EPFL and Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin have developed a method for identifying the most likely gaits of extinct animals and designed a robot that can recreate their walk.

Health - Life Sciences - 15.01.2019
Engineered'T cells promote long-term organ transplant acceptance
Engineered’T cells promote long-term organ transplant acceptance
Organ transplant rejection is a major problem in transplantation medicine. Suppressing the immune system to prevent organ rejection, however, opens the door to life-threatening infections. Researchers at the University of Basel's Biozentrum have now discovered a molecular approach preventing rejection of the transplanted graft while simultaneously maintaining the ability to fight against infections.

Life Sciences - 14.01.2019
Potential for risky behavior is also in your genes
As part of an international research project, a group of scientists from the University of Zurich found genetic variants associated with risk tolerance and risky behaviors. It is one of the first studies to link genetic variants with behavioral outcomes, which are relevant to social science research.

Life Sciences - 14.01.2019
A metabolic checkpoint for embryonic stem cell differentiation
A metabolic checkpoint for embryonic stem cell differentiation
Upon exit from self-renewal, embryonic stem cells differentiate into different types of tissues - a process regulated by various complex mechanisms. Recent work published by the Betschinger group shows the importance of the lysosome - which is directly associated with cellular metabolism and nutrition - in developmental progression.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.01.2019
Turbocharger for the cell machinery
Turbocharger for the cell machinery
Researchers of the University of Bern have discovered a new molecular regulatory mechanism in unicellular parasites which has never before been observed. RNA fragments do not act as brakes in the cell apparatus, but on the contrary as "stimulants": they boost protein production after periods of stress.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.01.2019
Speeding up genetic diagnosis of Huntington’s disease
Elongated segments of DNA cause Huntington's disease and certain other disorders of the brain. Researchers have developed a method to determine the length of the mutated genes quickly and easily. People with Huntington's disease suffer from jerky body movements and decreasing mental abilities. The condition usually leads to death 15-20 years after diagnosis.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 10.01.2019
How Drugs Can Minimize the Side Effects of Chemotherapy
Researchers at the University of Zurich have determined the three-dimensional structure of the receptor that causes nausea and vomiting as a result of cancer chemotherapy. The study explains for the first time why some drugs work particularly well in ameliorating these side effects. The results also provide important insights into how to develop compounds to effectively tackle other disorders.

Physics - Life Sciences - 02.01.2019
Pushing the boundaries of the visible
Pushing the boundaries of the visible
Our cutting-edge technology platforms are key enablers of research at the FMI. One of the biggest of these, with the largest number of users, is the Facility for Advanced Imaging and Microscopy (FAIM). To find out more about the facility, and microscopy in general, we spoke to the joint heads of FAIM - Christel Genoud, who is responsible for Electron Microscopy, and Laurent Gelman, responsible for Light Microscopy.