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Results 101 - 120 of 373.


Life Sciences - Materials Science - 18.06.2020
Nanoresearch without animal experiments
Nanoresearch without animal experiments
In order to reduce the number of animal experiments in research, alternative methods are being sought. This is a particular challenge if the safety of substances that have hardly been studied is to be ensured, for instance, the completely new class of nanomaterials. To accomplish just that, Empa researchers are now combining test tube experiments with mathematical modelling.

Environment - 17.06.2020
Arctic Ocean acidification worse than previously expected
Arctic Ocean acidification worse than previously expected
The Arctic Ocean will take up more CO2 over the 21st century than predicted by most climate models. This additional CO2 causes a distinctly stronger ocean acidification. These results were published in a study by climate scientists from the University of Bern and École normale supérieure in Paris. Ocean acidification threatens the life of calcifying organisms - such as mussels and "sea butterflies" - and can have serious consequences for the entire food chain.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 17.06.2020
Surprising Signal in Dark Matter Detector
Surprising Signal in Dark Matter Detector
When analyzing data from the XENON1T detector for dark matter, a signal excess was observed. The UZH researchers do not yet know for sure where this unexpected signal comes from. They say the origins could be relatively banal, but they could also indicate the existence of new particles or hitherto unknown properties of neutrinos.

Life Sciences - 17.06.2020
A fair reward ensures a good memory
A fair reward ensures a good memory
By deciphering the neural dialogue between the brain's reward and memory networks, neuroscientists from the University of Geneva demonstrate that optimal memory performance requires an intermediate regime of reward delivery. A new finding highly relevant for a variety of learning situations. How does our memory work and how can we optimize its mechanisms on a daily basis? This question is at the heart of many neuroscience research projects.

Environment - Life Sciences - 17.06.2020
Aquascope: shedding light on underwater life
Aquascope: shedding light on underwater life
The live images from the Aquascope reveal an amazing underwater world. Lake Greifen is home to a smorgasbord of wonderful creatures - star-shaped, cylindrical, horned or extravagantly coiffed. But as well as stimulating the imagination, the phytoand zooplankton floating in water serves as an indicator of the ecological status of surface waters.

Physics - Life Sciences - 16.06.2020
Multicolor super-resolution imaging made easy
Multicolor super-resolution imaging made easy
Scientists at EPFL have developed robust and easy-to-implement multicolor super-resolution imaging. The approach is based on the simultaneous acquisition of two spectral channels followed by spectral cross-cumulant analysis and unmixing. They exploit fluorophore blinking and spectral crosstalk for the generation of additional color channels with super-resolved images.

Physics - Chemistry - 16.06.2020
The smallest motor in the world
The smallest motor in the world
A research team from Empa and EPFL has developed a molecular motor which consists of only 16 atoms and rotates reliably in one direction. It could allow energy harvesting at the atomic level. The special feature of the motor is that it moves exactly at the boundary between classical motion and quantum tunneling - and has revealed puzzling phenomena to researchers in the quantum realm.

Physics - Computer Science - 16.06.2020
Combining magnetic data storage and logic
Combining magnetic data storage and logic
Computers normally store and process data in separate modules. But now researchers at ETH Zurich and the Paul Scherrer Institute have developed a method that allows logical operations to be performed directly within a memory element. Anyone who has ever accidentally pulled out the plug of a desktop computer will recall the painful moment when they realised that any unsaved information was lost forever.

Physics - 15.06.2020
Melting a crystal topologically
Melting a crystal topologically
Physicists at EPFL have successfully melted a very thin crystal of magnetic quasi-particles controllably, as turning ice into water. Novel phases of matter have been discovered and a new model system for fundamental physics studies has been established. The introduction of topology, a branch of mathematics focusing on the properties of "knots", into physics has inspired revolutionary concepts such as topological phases of matter and topological phase transitions, which results in the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2016.

Computer Science - 15.06.2020
The first intuitive programming language for quantum computers
The first intuitive programming language for quantum computers
Several technical advances have been achieved recently in the pursuit of powerful quantum computers. Now, Computer scientists from ETH Zurich have made an important breakthrough in the field of programming languages: their quantum language is the first of its kind that is as elegant, simple and safe as classical computer languages.

Physics - Chemistry - 12.06.2020
A surprising quantum effect observed in a
A surprising quantum effect observed in a "large" object
While conducting experiments on a layered metal, EPFL researchers witnessed something very surprising. The unexpected electron behavior they discovered could open up possibilities in the field of quantum computing. In the world of materials science, sometimes main discoveries can be found in unexpected places.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 11.06.2020
Solving a Parkinson's disease puzzle through protein design
EPFL researchers, in collaboration with UTSW and UCSD scientists, have developed a computational protein design approach, and used it to obtain the first ever high-resolution structure of an activated dopamine receptor in its natural cell membrane environment. The breakthrough will open up a new dimension in drug discovery for Parkinson's disease and perhaps other disorders.

Health - 11.06.2020
Our sleep during lockdown: longer and more regular, but worse
A survey conducted by the University of Basel and the Psychiatric Hospital of the University of Basel has investigated how sleep has changed during the Covid-19 lockdown. The 435 individuals surveyed - most of whom were women - reported sleeping longer but with a deterioration in sleep quality. The results of the study were published in the scientific journal Current Biology.

Environment - 10.06.2020
Mobile system measures water quality in real time
Mobile system measures water quality in real time
Rain enables crops to grow, but it also causes the run-off of pesticides to rivers and streams. Concentrations of these substances in surface waters can be monitored by means of regular sampling. However, with the traditional approach - grab sampling and determination of mean values - it is rarely, if ever, possible to measure the peak concentrations associated with heavy rainfall.

Materials Science - Physics - 10.06.2020
Surprisingly strong and deformable silicon
Surprisingly strong and deformable silicon
Researchers at ETH have shown that tiny objects can be made from silicon that are much more deformable and stronger than previously thought. In this way, sensors in smartphones could be made smaller and more robust. Since the invention of the MOSFET transistor sixty year ago, the chemical element silicon on which it is based has become an integral part of modern life.

Materials Science - Health - 09.06.2020
First transparent surgical mask goes into production
First transparent surgical mask goes into production
Scientists of Empa and EPFL have developed a fully transparent surgical mask that will soon be produced on an industrial scale.

Social Sciences - Life Sciences - 09.06.2020
Human Presence Weakens Social Relationships of Giraffes
Human Presence Weakens Social Relationships of Giraffes
Living close to human settlements disturbs the social networks of giraffes. They have weaker bonds with other giraffes and fewer interactions with other members of the species, an international study led by the University of Zurich on the social structure of over 500 female giraffes in Tanzania has shown.

Life Sciences - Health - 09.06.2020
RedHUMAN: Deciphering links between genes and metabolism
RedHUMAN: Deciphering links between genes and metabolism
Scientists at EPFL have developed a new method that simplifies the processing of genetic-metabolic data by picking up changes in metabolism, a hallmark of numerous diseases like cancer and Alzheimer's. The new method, named redHUMAN, is robust and features guaranteed predictability. In the last two decades, the life sciences have seen a growing partnership with information technology.

Astronomy / Space Science - Earth Sciences - 08.06.2020
First global map of rockfalls on the Moon
First global map of rockfalls on the Moon
A research team from ETH Zurich and the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research in Göttingen counted over 136,000 rockfalls on the moon caused by asteroid impacts. Even billions of years old landscapes are still changing. In October 2015, a spectacular rockfall occurred in the Swiss Alps: in the late morning hours, a large, snow-covered block with a volume of more than 1500 cubic meters suddenly detached from the summit of Mel de la Niva.

Chemistry - Health - 08.06.2020
Standardizing organoid growth through controlled guidance systems
A recent innovation from an EPFL laboratory will enable, for the first time, mass production of standardized organoids. This breakthrough was achieved thanks to a customized guidance system that ensures homogenous cell culturing. Described in an article published today in Nature Biomedical Engineering, the technique paves the way for industrial uses, such as screening new drugs.