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Results 21 - 40 of 302.


Life Sciences - 23.06.2020
Blocking sugar metabolism slows lung tumour growth
Blocking sugar metabolism slows lung tumour growth
Treatments that block two sugar-transporting proteins could help slow the growth of lung tumours, new research from EPFL suggests. Blocking a pair of sugar-transporting proteins may be a useful treatment approach for lung cancer, suggests a new study in mice and human cells published today in eLife .

Microtechnics - 23.06.2020
Deep Drone Acrobatics
Deep Drone Acrobatics
A navigation algorithm developed at the University of Zurich enables drones to learn challenging acrobatic maneuvers. Autonomous quadcopters can be trained using simulations to increase their speed, agility and efficiency, which benefits conventional search and rescue operations. Since the dawn of flight, pilots have used acrobatic maneuvers to test the limits of their airplanes.

Chemistry - Materials Science - 23.06.2020
Growing polymers with different lengths
Growing polymers with different lengths
ETH researchers have developed a new method for producing polymers with different lengths. This paves the way for new classes of polymer materials to be used in previously inconceivable applications. It is hard to imagine everyday life without materials made of synthetic polymers. Clothes, car parts, computers or packaging - they all consist of polymer materials.

Physics - Life Sciences - 22.06.2020
Super-resolution microscopy reveals a twist inside of cells
Super-resolution microscopy reveals a twist inside of cells
EPFL biophysicists have developed a high-throughput super-resolution microscope to probe nanoscale structures and dynamics of mammalian cells, showing in unprecedented detail the twists and turns of an organelle important for cell division. If you want to understand the underlying mechanisms of cellular motility and division, then the centriole is the organelle of interest.

Life Sciences - 22.06.2020
Building corticocerebellar neural circuits
Building corticocerebellar neural circuits
In a comprehensive study, researchers from the Rijli group found that a single Hox transcription factor expressed in a group of neurons of the pontine nucleus - the cerebral cortex most important brainstem relay to the cerebellum - determines the wiring onto these neurons of somatosensory cortical neurons, while avoiding visual cortical neurons.

Physics - Chemistry - 19.06.2020
Researchers cut atom-sized patterns into 2D materials
Researchers cut atom-sized patterns into 2D materials
EPFL researchers have developed a high-precision technology that enables them to carve nanometric patterns into two-dimensional materials. With their pioneering nanotechnology, EPFL researchers have achieved the impossible. They can now use heat to break the links between atoms with a miniature scalpel.

Physics - Materials Science - 19.06.2020
Researchers cut nanometer-sized patterns into 2D materials
Researchers cut nanometer-sized patterns into 2D materials
EPFL researchers have developed a high-precision technology that enables them to carve nanometric patterns into two-dimensional materials. With their pioneering nanotechnology, EPFL researchers have achieved the impossible. They can now use heat to break the links between atoms with a miniature scalpel.

Physics - 18.06.2020
Capturing moving subjects in still-life quality
Capturing moving subjects in still-life quality
Researchers at EPFL's Advanced Quantum Architecture Laboratory and the University of Wisconsin-Madison have developed a technique for building crystal-clear images of moving subjects. The team will present its paper at the prestigious SIGGRAPH 2020 conference in August. In 2019, Edoardo Charbon, a professor at EPFL's School of Engineering (STI), was attending a workshop in Canada.

Psychology - 18.06.2020
Decide Now or Wait for Something Better?
Decide Now or Wait for Something Better?
When we make decisions, we don't always have all options available to choose from at the same time. Instead they often come one after another, so we have to decide on something without knowing if a better option might have come along later. A study at the University of Zurich has shown that our standards drop more and more in the course of decision-making.

Life Sciences - Materials Science - 18.06.2020
Nanoresearch without animal experiments
Nanoresearch without animal experiments
In order to reduce the number of animal experiments in research, alternative methods are being sought. This is a particular challenge if the safety of substances that have hardly been studied is to be ensured, for instance, the completely new class of nanomaterials. To accomplish just that, Empa researchers are now combining test tube experiments with mathematical modelling.

Environment - 17.06.2020
Arctic Ocean acidification worse than previously expected
Arctic Ocean acidification worse than previously expected
The Arctic Ocean will take up more CO2 over the 21st century than predicted by most climate models. This additional CO2 causes a distinctly stronger ocean acidification. These results were published in a study by climate scientists from the University of Bern and École normale supérieure in Paris. Ocean acidification threatens the life of calcifying organisms - such as mussels and "sea butterflies" - and can have serious consequences for the entire food chain.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 17.06.2020
Surprising Signal in Dark Matter Detector
Surprising Signal in Dark Matter Detector
When analyzing data from the XENON1T detector for dark matter, a signal excess was observed. The UZH researchers do not yet know for sure where this unexpected signal comes from. They say the origins could be relatively banal, but they could also indicate the existence of new particles or hitherto unknown properties of neutrinos.

Life Sciences - 17.06.2020
A fair reward ensures a good memory
A fair reward ensures a good memory
By deciphering the neural dialogue between the brain's reward and memory networks, neuroscientists from the University of Geneva demonstrate that optimal memory performance requires an intermediate regime of reward delivery. A new finding highly relevant for a variety of learning situations. How does our memory work and how can we optimize its mechanisms on a daily basis? This question is at the heart of many neuroscience research projects.

Environment - Life Sciences - 17.06.2020
Aquascope: shedding light on underwater life
Aquascope: shedding light on underwater life
The live images from the Aquascope reveal an amazing underwater world. Lake Greifen is home to a smorgasbord of wonderful creatures - star-shaped, cylindrical, horned or extravagantly coiffed. But as well as stimulating the imagination, the phytoand zooplankton floating in water serves as an indicator of the ecological status of surface waters.

Physics - Life Sciences - 16.06.2020
Multicolor super-resolution imaging made easy
Multicolor super-resolution imaging made easy
Scientists at EPFL have developed robust and easy-to-implement multicolor super-resolution imaging. The approach is based on the simultaneous acquisition of two spectral channels followed by spectral cross-cumulant analysis and unmixing. They exploit fluorophore blinking and spectral crosstalk for the generation of additional color channels with super-resolved images.

Physics - Chemistry - 16.06.2020
The smallest motor in the world
The smallest motor in the world
A research team from Empa and EPFL has developed a molecular motor which consists of only 16 atoms and rotates reliably in one direction. It could allow energy harvesting at the atomic level. The special feature of the motor is that it moves exactly at the boundary between classical motion and quantum tunneling - and has revealed puzzling phenomena to researchers in the quantum realm.

Physics - Computer Science - 16.06.2020
Combining magnetic data storage and logic
Combining magnetic data storage and logic
Computers normally store and process data in separate modules. But now researchers at ETH Zurich and the Paul Scherrer Institute have developed a method that allows logical operations to be performed directly within a memory element. Anyone who has ever accidentally pulled out the plug of a desktop computer will recall the painful moment when they realised that any unsaved information was lost forever.

Physics - 15.06.2020
Melting a crystal topologically
Melting a crystal topologically
Physicists at EPFL have successfully melted a very thin crystal of magnetic quasi-particles controllably, as turning ice into water. Novel phases of matter have been discovered and a new model system for fundamental physics studies has been established. The introduction of topology, a branch of mathematics focusing on the properties of "knots", into physics has inspired revolutionary concepts such as topological phases of matter and topological phase transitions, which results in the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2016.

Computer Science - 15.06.2020
The first intuitive programming language for quantum computers
The first intuitive programming language for quantum computers
Several technical advances have been achieved recently in the pursuit of powerful quantum computers. Now, Computer scientists from ETH Zurich have made an important breakthrough in the field of programming languages: their quantum language is the first of its kind that is as elegant, simple and safe as classical computer languages.

Physics - Chemistry - 12.06.2020
A surprising quantum effect observed in a
A surprising quantum effect observed in a "large" object
While conducting experiments on a layered metal, EPFL researchers witnessed something very surprising. The unexpected electron behavior they discovered could open up possibilities in the field of quantum computing. In the world of materials science, sometimes main discoveries can be found in unexpected places.