news 2020


Category


Years
2020 | 2019 | 2018 | 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008


Results 21 - 40 of 118.


Astronomy / Space Science - Materials Science - 12.03.2020
Puzzle about nitrogen solved thanks to cometary analogues
Puzzle about nitrogen solved thanks to cometary analogues
One of the basic building blocks of life is nitrogen. An international consortium was able to detect ammonium salt containing nitrogen on the cometary surface of Chury thanks to a method using analogues for comet material. The method on which the study on the detection of ammonium salt is based was developed at the University of Bern.

Life Sciences - 12.03.2020
New universal carrier ink for 3D printing
New universal carrier ink for 3D printing
Researchers at ETH have produced a gel from cellulose fibres and biodegradable nanoparticles that liquifies when pressed through the nozzle of a 3D printer, but then quickly returns to its original shape. Their invention paves the way for personalised biomaterial implants. In the same way that medicine has seen a trend towards precision medicine - where treatment is tailored to the genetic make-up of the patient - in recent years, materials scientists are increasingly turning their attention to precision biomaterials.

Health - Life Sciences - 12.03.2020
Gold nanoparticles uncover amyloid fibrils
EPFL scientists have developed powerful tools to unmask the diversity of amyloid fibrils, which are associated with Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. The scientists made the breakthrough by developing gold nanoparticles that combine with cryogenic transmission electron microscopy, to provide rapid and unprecedented images of fibrils.

Astronomy / Space Science - Chemistry - 11.03.2020
Iron rain in the evening on a giant exoplanet
Iron rain in the evening on a giant exoplanet
An international team of astronomers, led by UNIGE, has discovered a planet where it rains iron. Thanks to a new instrument conceived by the University of Geneva , Switzerland, and set at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) of the European Southern Observatory (ESO), an international team of researchers, led by UNIGE, has observed a planet featuring iron rains.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 11.03.2020
Nano-sponge with extreme properties
Nano-sponge with extreme properties
A new process simplifies the fabrication of porous materials with a defined nanostructure and takes them one step closer to mass production. Materials with a defined nanostructure can have surprising properties. One example is a lightweight ceramic that springs back to its original shape, like a sponge, after being compressed.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 10.03.2020
Solved: the mystery of the expansion of the universe
Solved: the mystery of the expansion of the universe
A researcher from the University of Geneva has solved a scientific controversy about the speed of the expansion of the universe by suggesting that it is not totally homogeneous on a large scale. The earth, solar system, entire Milky Way and the few thousand galaxies closest to us move in a vast "bubble" that is 250 million light years in diameter, where the average density of matter is half as large as for the rest of the universe.

Computer Science / Telecom - Physics - 10.03.2020
Introducing the light-operated hard drives of tomorrow
Introducing the light-operated hard drives of tomorrow
What do you get when you place a thin film of perovkite material used in solar cells on top of a magnetic substrate? More efficient hard drive technology. EPFL physicist László Forró and his team pave the way for the future of data storage. "The key was to get the technology to work at room temperature," explains László Forró, EPFL physicist.

Health - Pharmacology - 09.03.2020
Circulatory failure is predictable
Circulatory failure is predictable
Researchers at ETH Zurich and Bern University Hospital have developed a method for predicting circulatory failure in patients in intensive care units - enabling clinicians to intervene at an early stage. Their approach uses machine learning methods to evaluate an extensive body of patient data. Patients in a hospital's intensive care unit are kept under close observation: clinicians continuously monitor their vital signs such as their pulse, blood pressure and blood oxygen saturation.

Environment - 04.03.2020
Energy self-sufficient households by 2050?
Energy self-sufficient households by 2050?
Researchers from ETH Zurich investigated whether it would be technically and economically feasible for households to achieve energy self-sufficiency using photovoltaics alone in the temperate Swiss climate by the middle of the century. By 2050, photovoltaic technologies that convert sunlight into electricity could enable many singleand multi-family buildings in Switzerland to produce enough energy to meet their own consumption needs, including the charging of electric vehicles.

Life Sciences - 03.03.2020
A glitch in the Matrix: Using virtual reality to understand how fish predict the future
A glitch in the Matrix: Using virtual reality to understand how fish predict the future
Scientists from the Friedrich group have developed a new virtual reality system that allows them to manipulate the sensory environment of adult zebrafish at will, while simultaneously analyzing neural activity. This approach can be used to explore how the brain processes complex sensory inputs and how it uses internal models of the world to control behaviors.

Computer Science / Telecom - Physics - 03.03.2020
Solving problems of analytic continuation through machine learning
Solving problems of analytic continuation through machine learning
An EPFL student has shown how deep learning can be used to analytically connect digital simulations and experimental results more quickly and reliably than conventional methods. This work, which the student carried out for his semester project, was recently published in Physical Review Letters. It's not unusual for scientists to compare experimental results with the predictions made by theoretical models.

Environment - 02.03.2020
Directed Species Loss from Species-Rich Forests Strongly Decreases Productivity
Directed Species Loss from Species-Rich Forests Strongly Decreases Productivity
At high species richness, directed loss, but not random loss, of tree species strongly decreases forest productivity. This is shown by data from a big forest project in China in which the University of Zurich is involved. Previous studies based on random species loss could therefore bias the predictions of how more realistic extinction scenarios are likely to affect ecosystem functioning.

Life Sciences - Health - 28.02.2020
Calculating the beginnings of the coronavirus epidemic
Calculating the beginnings of the coronavirus epidemic
Analyses of publicly available genome data provide clues to the beginnings of the coronavirus epidemic in China. Researchers from the Department of Biosystems Science and Engineering at ETH Zurich in Basel used a statistical model they had developed in recent years. Since the current coronavirus epidemic started, scientists and authorities have determined the genetic fingerprint of virus samples from numerous affected countries.

Social Sciences - Innovation - 28.02.2020
Hunter-Gatherer Networks Accelerated Human Evolution
Hunter-Gatherer Networks Accelerated Human Evolution
Humans began developing a complex culture as early as the Stone Age. This development was brought about by social interactions between various groups of hunters and gatherers, a UZH study has now confirmed. The researchers mapped the social networks of present-day hunter-gatherers in the Philippines and simulated the discovery of a medicinal plant product.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 28.02.2020
Tracking down the mystery of matter
Tracking down the mystery of matter
Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI have measured a property of the neutron more precisely than ever before. In the process they found out that the elementary particle has a significantly smaller electric dipole moment than was previously assumed. With that, it has also become less likely that this dipole moment can help to explain the origin of all matter in the universe.

Chemistry - Mechanical Engineering - 28.02.2020
More efficient, longer-lasting solid oxide fuel cells
More efficient, longer-lasting solid oxide fuel cells
Researchers at EPFL have developed a novel way to increase fuel-cell efficiency and lifespan, using a recirculation fan driven by a steam turbine that runs on steam-lubricated bearings. Solid oxide fuel cells, or SOFCs, are devices that produce both electricity and heat by oxidizing a fuel such as natural gas or biogas.

Chemistry - Physics - 27.02.2020
Tying up molecules as easily as you tie up your laces
Tying up molecules as easily as you tie up your laces
UNIGE researchers have succeeded in tying molecules together, thereby modifying their intrinsic mechanical properties. Knots are all around us: in computer cables, headphones and wires. But, although they can be a nuisance, they're also very useful when it comes to tying up your laces or when you go sailing.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 27.02.2020
How enzymes build sugar trees
How enzymes build sugar trees
Researchers have used cryo-electron microscopy to elucidate for the first time the structure and function of a very small enzyme embedded in cell membranes. This enzyme builds complex sugar trees that are subsequently attached to other membrane proteins. The findings could accelerate the development of new, protein-based medications.

Physics - Health - 26.02.2020
Glass slides that stand to revolutionize fluorescence microscopy
Glass slides that stand to revolutionize fluorescence microscopy
EPFL scientists have developed a new type of microscope slide that can boost the amount of light in fluorescence microscopy by a factor of up to 25. These new slides can both amplify and direct light, making them ideal for applications ranging from early-stage diagnosis to the rapid archiving of pathology samples.

Health - Chemistry - 26.02.2020
Better care: fast, sensitive blood tests for use at home
Better care: fast, sensitive blood tests for use at home
They should be fast, portable and easy to use: blood tests that can be done at home. Having already come up with a prototype, ETH Pioneer Fellow Alexander Tanno is working with doctoral student Yves Blickenstorfer to bring the idea to market. The prototype that Alexander Tanno is holding between his thumb and forefinger doesn't look particularly impressive.