news 2020

« BACK

Chemistry



Results 1 - 20 of 30.


Physics - Chemistry - 08.07.2020
Porous nitrogen-doped graphene ribbons for future electronics
Porous nitrogen-doped graphene ribbons for future electronics
A team of physicists and chemists has produced the first porous graphene ribbons in which specific carbon atoms in the crystal lattice are replaced with nitrogen atoms. These ribbons have semiconducting properties that make them attractive for applications in electronics and quantum computing, as reported by researchers from the Universities of Basel, Bern, Lancaster and Warwick in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 06.07.2020
Structural insights into Fe-S protein biogenesis
Structural insights into Fe-S protein biogenesis
The cytosolic iron sulfur assembly (CIA) pathway is required for the insertion of Fe-S clusters into proteins, including many DNA replication and repair factors. Despite its essential cellular function, this pathway remains enigmatic. A new integrative structural and biochemical study from the Thomä group now provides detailed insights into the mechanisms of Fe-S protein biogenesis.

Chemistry - Materials Science - 23.06.2020
Growing polymers with different lengths
Growing polymers with different lengths
ETH researchers have developed a new method for producing polymers with different lengths. This paves the way for new classes of polymer materials to be used in previously inconceivable applications. It is hard to imagine everyday life without materials made of synthetic polymers. Clothes, car parts, computers or packaging - they all consist of polymer materials.

Physics - Chemistry - 19.06.2020
Researchers cut atom-sized patterns into 2D materials
Researchers cut atom-sized patterns into 2D materials
EPFL researchers have developed a high-precision technology that enables them to carve nanometric patterns into two-dimensional materials. With their pioneering nanotechnology, EPFL researchers have achieved the impossible. They can now use heat to break the links between atoms with a miniature scalpel.

Physics - Chemistry - 16.06.2020
The smallest motor in the world
The smallest motor in the world
A research team from Empa and EPFL has developed a molecular motor which consists of only 16 atoms and rotates reliably in one direction. It could allow energy harvesting at the atomic level. The special feature of the motor is that it moves exactly at the boundary between classical motion and quantum tunneling - and has revealed puzzling phenomena to researchers in the quantum realm.

Physics - Chemistry - 12.06.2020
A surprising quantum effect observed in a
A surprising quantum effect observed in a "large" object
While conducting experiments on a layered metal, EPFL researchers witnessed something very surprising. The unexpected electron behavior they discovered could open up possibilities in the field of quantum computing. In the world of materials science, sometimes main discoveries can be found in unexpected places.

Chemistry - Health - 08.06.2020
Standardizing organoid growth through controlled guidance systems
A recent innovation from an EPFL laboratory will enable, for the first time, mass production of standardized organoids. This breakthrough was achieved thanks to a customized guidance system that ensures homogenous cell culturing. Described in an article published today in Nature Biomedical Engineering, the technique paves the way for industrial uses, such as screening new drugs.

Chemistry - Health - 08.06.2020
Standardizing organoid growth through controlled cell culturing
A recent innovation from an EPFL laboratory will enable, for the first time, mass production of standardized organoids. This breakthrough was achieved thanks to a customized guidance system that ensures homogenous cell culturing. Described in an article published today in Nature Biomedical Engineering, the technique paves the way for industrial uses, such as screening new drugs.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 29.05.2020
The Transistor out of the Printer
The Transistor out of the Printer
A new revolution in the production of electronic circuits is on the way: Empa researchers are working on electronics that come out of printers. This makes it possible to produce the circuits on all sorts of substrates, such as paper or plastic film - but there are still some hurdles to overcome. Imagine being able to easily print electronics on any surface.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 11.05.2020
Lighting the path for cells
Lighting the path for cells
ETH researchers have developed a new method in which they use light to draw patterns of molecules that guide living cells. The approach allows for a closer look at the development of multicellular organisms - and in the future may even play a part in novel therapies.   Highly complex organisms can arise from a single cell, which is one of the true miracles of nature.

Chemistry - Physics - 01.05.2020
In search of the lighting material of the future
In search of the lighting material of the future
At the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI, researchers have gained insights into a promising material for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). The substance enables high light yields and would be inexpensive to produce on a large scale - that means it is practically made for use in large-area room lighting.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 14.04.2020
Controlled genome editing moves a step closer
Controlled genome editing moves a step closer
Scientists at EPFL have developed an artificial protein that can keep the CRISPR genome-editing tool on its tracks. The research appears in a paper Chemical Biology A team at EPFL's Laboratory of Protein Design & Immunoengineering (LDPI), led by Professor Bruno Correia, working with Dominik Niopek's lab at Heidelberg University Hospital and the BioQuant Center, Heidelberg, Germany, have designed a protein (AcrX in short), using computational approaches, that can control CRISPR genome-editing in human cells.

Environment - Chemistry - 14.04.2020
Computer modelling deciphers the important role of the river-groundwater interface as a hot spot for arsenic release
Computer modelling deciphers the important role of the river-groundwater interface as a hot spot for arsenic release
Naturally occurring (geogenic) arsenic contamination in groundwater is a problem of global significance, with noteworthy occurrences in large parts of the alluvial and deltaic aquifers in South and Southeast Asia. Computer models are necessary to analyse field observations, to unravel which chemical and physical processes play a role, and to predict the behaviour of arsenic within aquifers - namely where and when pollution may occur in the future.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 07.04.2020
How wallflowers evolved a complementary pair of plant defenses
How wallflowers evolved a complementary pair of plant defenses
A new study led by Tobias Züst from the Institute of Plant Sciences of the University of Bern shows that a pair of complementary chemical defenses evolved independently in wallflowers, shaped by co-evolution with local insects. A pair of chemicals used by wallflowers and their kin to ward off predators have evolved to complement each other, with one targeting generalist herbivores and the other targeting specialized herbivores that have become resistant to the generalist defense.

Chemistry - Environment - 06.04.2020
How the chemical industry can meet the climate goals
How the chemical industry can meet the climate goals
ETH researchers analysed various possibilities for reducing the net CO2 emissions of the chemical industry to zero. Their conclusion? The chemical industry can in fact have a carbon-neutral future. Switzerland's Federal Council has decided that the country should become carbon-neutral by 2050. This may be challenging as far as car traffic and the entire power sector are concerned, but not impossible - with systematic electrification and the exclusive use of carbon-neutral energy sources, for example.

Chemistry - Physics - 18.03.2020
Chemistry: Access to forbidden rings
Chemistry: Access to forbidden rings
Researchers from the University of Geneva have developed a new method for creating chains of molecular rings with unparalleled sophistication. Cyclic molecules are everywhere, and everything around us stems from the way they are assembled: not just taste, colour and smell but also (for example) pharmaceutical drugs.

Chemistry - Environment - 13.03.2020
First-time direct proof of chemical reactions in particulates
First-time direct proof of chemical reactions in particulates
Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI have developed a new method to analyse particulate matter more precisely than ever before. With its help, they disproved an established doctrine: that molecules in aerosols undergo no further chemical transformations because they are enclosed in other suspended particulate matter.

Astronomy / Space Science - Chemistry - 11.03.2020
Iron rain in the evening on a giant exoplanet
Iron rain in the evening on a giant exoplanet
An international team of astronomers, led by UNIGE, has discovered a planet where it rains iron. Thanks to a new instrument conceived by the University of Geneva , Switzerland, and set at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) of the European Southern Observatory (ESO), an international team of researchers, led by UNIGE, has observed a planet featuring iron rains.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 11.03.2020
Nano-sponge with extreme properties
Nano-sponge with extreme properties
A new process simplifies the fabrication of porous materials with a defined nanostructure and takes them one step closer to mass production. Materials with a defined nanostructure can have surprising properties. One example is a lightweight ceramic that springs back to its original shape, like a sponge, after being compressed.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 11.03.2020
Yellow is the new brown
Yellow is the new brown
If different types of vegetables and fruits are stored together, they influence each other's ripening process. This is due to ethylene, which is emitted by some plant-based foodstuff and accelerates ripening. To prevent excessive food waste due to accelerated ripening Empa and ETH Zurich researchers are developing a new catalyst that degrades ethylene into water and carbon dioxide.