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Results 101 - 116 of 116.


Life Sciences - Health - 11.02.2020
Connecting two important processes in gene expression
Connecting two important processes in gene expression
RNA decay plays a fundamental role in gene expression by controlling the quality and quantity of messenger RNAs. However, it has proved difficult to study and is still shrouded in mystery. Scientists from the Bühler group now uncovered key targets, components and functions of mammalian RNA decay pathways, and found that RNA decay is tightly connected to another crucial stage of gene expression: protein synthesis (translation).

Life Sciences - 10.02.2020
Observe how microorganisms interact
Observe how microorganisms interact
Microbial communities are known to be indispensable for our planet. But surprisingly little is known about how they function. Researchers at the Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology and ETH Zurich are now shedding a little light on this subject. Without them there would be on oxygen, humans and animals could not digest, and the material cycles on Earth would come to a halt: Microorganisms.

Life Sciences - Environment - 10.02.2020
New world map of fish genetic diversity
New world map of fish genetic diversity
An international research team has studied genetic diversity among fish around the world for the first time. Their research produced a map that will serve as a tool in improving the protection of species and genetic diversity in the future. In a population of animals or plants, genetic diversity can decline much more quickly than species diversity in response to various stress factors: disease, changes to habitat or climate, and so on.

Life Sciences - 10.02.2020
Observe how microorganisms interact
Observe how microorganisms interact
Without them there would be no oxygen, humans and animals could not digest, and the material cycles on Earth would come to a halt: Microorganisms. Microbial communities also carry out important functions in aquatic systems. These are often the result of interactions between organisms within the community.

Life Sciences - Health - 06.02.2020
Breathing may change your mind about free will
Is free will just an illusion? For decades, a signal from the brain called the "readiness potential" has been interpreted to mean that free will may be an illusion. Backed by signals from the brain and lungs, EPFL scientists have discovered that the readiness potential is in fact coupled to breathing and that acts of free will happen as you exhale - providing an unexpected perspective on free will.

Life Sciences - Health - 05.02.2020
Redrawing the map of cancer genome research
Redrawing the map of cancer genome research
Cancer's genetic causes are more diverse than previous scientific studies have indicated - a conclusion reached by researchers from ETH Zurich and University Hospital Zurich. Through their participation in an international research collaboration, they helped compile the most comprehensive catalogue to date of gene alterations associated with cancer.

Life Sciences - 27.01.2020
Could depression be linked to our cells' metabolism?
EPFL researchers have discovered a compound that stimulates brain-cell metabolism and reduces signs of depression in mice. The next step will be to test their findings on humans. Chronic stress can be a major cause of depression. The exact mechanism of how that works isn't clear, but the missing link could be found in the metabolic processes of brain cells.

Life Sciences - Mathematics - 21.01.2020
Reconstructing structure and function of a neuronal circuit
Reconstructing structure and function of a neuronal circuit
Reconstructing structure and function of a neuronal circuit The function of neuronal circuits is thought to be determined largely by specific connections between neurons. But this assumption has been difficult to test because the reconstruction of the synaptic connectivity of a neuronal circuit - its "wiring diagram" - is a major challenge.

Health - Life Sciences - 21.01.2020
Cardiac and visual degeneration arrested by a food supplement
Cardiac and visual degeneration arrested by a food supplement
UNIGE researchers have discovered a new gene that causes blindness and cardiomyopathy. They have also managed to halt the progression of eye disease and treat cardiac disease by administering a food supplement. Our genome consists of 20,000 genes, all of which may be capable of triggering disease. It is estimated that there are 7,000 unknown genes that cause recessive genetic diseases resulting from mutations in two copies of a gene that have been inherited from each parent.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.01.2020
Why we differ in our ability to fight off gut infections
Why we differ in our ability to fight off gut infections
Scientists at EPFL have published two papers showing how genetics affects the ability of different individuals to fight off gut infections. ?he ability of the immune system to fight off bacterial, viral and other invading agents in the gut differs between individuals. However, the biological mechanism by which this happens is not well understood, but at least part of this difference may be explained by genetic factors.

Life Sciences - 16.01.2020
No Difference for Beneficials between GM Plants with One or More Bt-Toxins
No Difference for Beneficials between GM Plants with One or More Bt-Toxins
The Biosafety Research Group at Agroscope has conducted a review of the literature on genetically modified plants that produce several insect-active Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins simultaneously. The experts were able to show that the toxins did not pose an increased risk for non-target organisms such as beneficials.

Life Sciences - 15.01.2020
Zebra finches learn their courtship song efficiently
Zebra finches learn their courtship song efficiently
Zebra finches are very efficient at learning their courtship songs, as researchers from ETH Zurich and the University of Zurich have shown. In the morning, the birds remember the positive learning progress of the previous day, but forget the failures overnight. Some principles and mechanisms of learning are identical, for example, in both language acquisition and in learning different motor skills.

Music - Life Sciences - 15.01.2020
How Zebra Finches Learn to Sing
How Zebra Finches Learn to Sing
Complex learning processes like speaking or singing follow similar patterns. Using the example of zebra finches, researchers at UZH and ETH Zurich have investigated how young birds imitate the courtship songs of their fathers and practice them thousands of times. The study has revealed what aspects of the song are remembered overnight, and that sleep allows the bird to optimally build upon the progress made on the previous day.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.01.2020
Toxoplasmosis rids its host of all fear
Toxoplasmosis rids its host of all fear
Researchers at UNIGE show how the parasite that causes toxoplasmosis colonizes the mouse brain in the form of cysts to such an extent that it drastically modifies the rodent's behaviour. The parasite Toxoplasma gondii infects animals, including humans. Its objective is to reach the intestines of felids, the  definitive host in which it reproduces sexually.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.01.2020
Machine keeps human livers alive for one week outside of the body
Machine keeps human livers alive for one week outside of the body
A team of researchers has developed a machine that repairs injured human livers and keeps them alive outside the body for one week. This breakthrough may increase the number of available organs for transplantation saving many lives of patients with severe liver diseases or cancer. Until now, livers could be stored safely outside the body for only a few hours.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 03.01.2020
Biodegradable bridges
Globe magazine , News By: Samuel Schlaefli Researchers are looking into new materials to lay the foundations for living structures that respond to their environment. They aim to create self-sustaining infrastructures that can monitor their condition and even repair themselves. When Eleni Chatzi is not busy reading technical papers about vibrating bridges, smart infrastructures and data-driven engineering, she enjoys immersing herself in science fiction novels.