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Results 41 - 60 of 113.


Life Sciences - 02.06.2020
FloChiP, a new tool optimizing gene-regulation studies
FloChiP, a new tool optimizing gene-regulation studies
EPFL scientists have developed FloChip, a new microfluidic take on the widely used chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) technique. By automating and cutting the cost of ChIP and sequential-ChIP, FloChIP has the potential to become a widely used tool for the study of chromatin biology and gene regulation.

Health - Life Sciences - 02.06.2020
A better model for neutrophil-related diseases
Neutrophils are critical immune cells for antimicrobial defense, but they can exacerbate a number of diseases, perhaps including COVID-19. The traditional approaches to study neutrophils in animal models are limited in specificity and effectiveness. EPFL scientists have now identified the problem and have developed a new, optimized model for studying the role of neutrophils in the context of disease.

Life Sciences - 02.06.2020
A genome-scale map of DNA methylation kinetics
While the first genome-wide DNA methylation map in mammalian cells was established over 10 years ago, such maps only provide snapshots and do not inform about the actual dynamics of this epigenetic mark. Researchers from the Schübeler group now quantified actual rates of methylation and demethylation for 860,404 individual CpGs in mouse embryonic stem cells.

Health - Life Sciences - 28.05.2020
Mapping Immune Cells in Brain Tumors
Mapping Immune Cells in Brain Tumors
It is not always possible to completely remove malignant brain tumors by surgery so that further treatment is necessary. Researchers from the University of Zurich and the UniversityHospital Zurich have now been able to describe, with unparalleled precision, the composition of the immune cells of various types of brain tumors.

Health - Life Sciences - 26.05.2020
Increased Usability and Precision in Vascular Imaging
Increased Usability and Precision in Vascular Imaging
Researchers at the University of Zurich have developed a new X-ray contrast agent. The contrast agent is easier to use and distributes into all blood vessels more reliably, increasing the precision of vascular imaging. This reduces the number of animals required in research experiments. Various diseases in humans and animals - such as tumors, strokes or chronic kidney disease - damage the blood vessels.

Life Sciences - Health - 25.05.2020
Even natural products can be harmful for the unborn child
Plant products ingested by pregnant women through their diet are broken down by the intestinal microbiota into chemical substances, some of which can cross the placental barrier and reach the fetus. These foreign substances can harm the unborn child, even if they are of "natural origin". Researchers at the Department for BioMedical Research (DBMR) at the University of Bern and Inselspital, University Hospital Bern, therefore warn against underestimating the effects of such substances.

Life Sciences - Health - 25.05.2020
DNA damage and neurodegenerative diseases: a talk with Claudia Magrin and Martina Sola
Claudia Magrin and Martina Sola are two researchers in neuroscience and PhD students at USI. They both work at the Laboratory for biomedical neurosciences of the Ente Ospedaliero Cantonale, in the research group led by Dr. Paolo Paganetti. They are currently working on a study on the relationship between Tau and P53 proteins in response to DNA damage, published in Communications Biology, one of Nature's scientific journals.

Life Sciences - Physics - 20.05.2020
Elucidating the mechanism of a light-driven sodium pump
Elucidating the mechanism of a light-driven sodium pump
Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI have succeeded for the first time in recording, in action, a light-driven sodium pump from bacterial cells.  The findings promise progress in the development of new methods in neurobiology. The researchers used the new X-ray free-electron laser SwissFEL for their investigations.

Life Sciences - Palaeontology - 20.05.2020
Prehistoric Giant Fish Was a Suspension Feeder
Prehistoric Giant Fish Was a Suspension Feeder
Scientists from the University of Zurich and the University of Bristol have investigated the jaw mechanics of Titanichthys, a giant armored fish that roamed the seas and oceans of the late Devonian period 380 million years ago. New findings suggest that it fed by swimming through water slowly with its mouth open wide to capture high concentrations of plankton - similar to modern-day basking sharks.

Life Sciences - Health - 18.05.2020
A deeper connection to hyaline fibromatosis syndrome
EPFL scientists have uncovered the molecular biology behind Hyaline Fibromatosis Syndrome, a severe genetic disease. Hyaline Fibromatosis Syndrome (HFS) is a rare but severe genetic disease that affects babies, children, and adults. Hyaline, a glassy substance, accumulates in the skin and various organs, and causes painful deformities that can lead to an early death.

Environment - Life Sciences - 18.05.2020
Environmental disturbances affect large species the most
Environmental disturbances affect large species the most
A fundamental characteristic of ecological communities is that small animals are more abundant than large ones. These "ecological pyramids" are found in both terrestrial and aquatic systems. Depending on the position of the organisms in the pyramid, their ecological functions differ and they react differently to human impact.

Life Sciences - Health - 15.05.2020
Designing vaccines from artificial proteins
Designing vaccines from artificial proteins
EPFL scientists have developed a new computational approach to create artificial proteins, which showed promising results in vivo as functional vaccines. This approach opens the possibility to engineer safer and more effective vaccines. Vaccines are one of the most effective interventions to prevent the spreading of infectious diseases.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.05.2020
Geography of childhood cancer in Switzerland studied
Geography of childhood cancer in Switzerland studied
A research group under the direction of the Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine of the University Bern has investigated the spatial distribution of childhood cancer risks in Switzerland for the period 1985-2015. The group found evidence of increased risks in certain areas, particularly for brain tumors.

Life Sciences - 12.05.2020
A novel pathway ensuring chromosome stability in early mice embryo
A novel pathway ensuring chromosome stability in early mice embryo
The Peters group studies chromatin formation and regulation in mammalian germ cells and during early embryonic development. Now researchers from the group identified a novel pathway that is essential for maintaining the integrity of heterochromatin, and therefore for securing chromosome stability. Chromatin - made up of DNA wrapped up around histone proteins - plays a major role in gene regulation by modulating the accessibility of transcription factors to their target sequences in the genome.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 11.05.2020
Peptides that can be taken as a pill
Peptides that can be taken as a pill
Peptides represent a billion-dollar market in the pharmaceutical industry, but they can generally only be taken as injections to avoid degradation by stomach enzymes. Scientists at EPFL have now developed a method to generate peptides that resist enzymatic degradation and can be taken orally. Peptides are short chains of amino acids that occur in our body, in plants or bacteria to control diverse functions.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 11.05.2020
Lighting the path for cells
Lighting the path for cells
ETH researchers have developed a new method in which they use light to draw patterns of molecules that guide living cells. The approach allows for a closer look at the development of multicellular organisms - and in the future may even play a part in novel therapies.   Highly complex organisms can arise from a single cell, which is one of the true miracles of nature.

Life Sciences - Health - 07.05.2020
Lipid Metabolism Controls Brain Development
Lipid Metabolism Controls Brain Development
A lipid metabolism enzyme controls brain stem cell activity and lifelong brain development. If the enzyme does not work correctly, it causes learning and memory deficits in humans and mice, as researchers at the University of Zurich have discovered. Regulating stem cell activity via lipid metabolism could lead to new treatments for brain diseases.

Life Sciences - Environment - 05.05.2020
Bacterial behaviour influences cloud formation
Bacterial behaviour influences cloud formation
ETH researchers have analysed individual marine bacterial cells to show that metabolic processes inside them determine the amount of gas they release, which is involved in cloud formation. Meteorologists have known for almost 50 years that the proverbial flapping of a butterfly's wings can trigger a hurricane in a completely different location.

Health - Life Sciences - 04.05.2020
Protective shield: How pathogens withstand acidic environments in the body
Protective shield: How pathogens withstand acidic environments in the body
Certain bacteria, including the dangerous nosocomial pathogen MRSA, can protect themselves from acidic conditions in our body and thus ensure their survival. Researchers at the Biozentrum of the University of Basel have now elucidated an important mechanism in this process. A transport protein involved in cell wall biosynthesis plays a key role, they report Structural & Molecular Biology.

Health - Life Sciences - 04.05.2020
Bern coronavirus clone goes "viral"
Researchers in virology and veterinary bacteriology at the University of Bern have cloned the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2). The synthetic clones are being used by research groups worldwide to test corona samples, find antiviral drugs and develop vaccines as quickly as possible. The method developed in Bern can also be used in future to combat other highly infectious viruses.