news 2021


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Results 41 - 60 of 553.


Environment - 04.11.2021
First full-year study of turbulent mixing in Lake Geneva
First full-year study of turbulent mixing in Lake Geneva
Changing temperatures and varying winds over the seasons cause great fluctuations in Lake Geneva. The LéXPLORE research platform monitored the movement of water within the lake for a year to learn more about how natural factors influence the lake's mixing. The resulting analysis now paints a fuller picture of mixing in large lakes, which had previously only been studied over shorter time periods.

Life Sciences - Environment - 03.11.2021
A natural CO2-sink thanks to symbiotic bacteria
A natural CO2-sink thanks to symbiotic bacteria
Like many land plants, seagrasses live in symbiosis with nitrogen-fixing bacteria. Researchers of the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen and Eawag now show that seagrass in the Mediterranean Sea lives in symbiosis with bacteria that reside in their roots and provide the nitrogen necessary for growth.

Health - Sport - 02.11.2021
Coronavirus: minimal transmission risk when playing football
Coronavirus: minimal transmission risk when playing football
A study by the Universities of Basel and Saarland shows that there is almost no risk of transmission of the COVID-19 virus on the field. They suggest that blanket quarantine measures for opposing teams are not justified if no close contact has taken place off the playing field. Governments have introduced various measures over the past 18 months in an effort to curb transmission of the COVID-19 virus.

Health - 02.11.2021
Therapy within the cell
Introducing therapeutic proteins into cells in a targeted manner may make it possible to treat diseases that were previously incurable. However, a method that has been researched for about 30 years often fails because many of the substances become stuck halfway. A research team at the University of Basel has now found a solution.

Social Sciences - 02.11.2021
Motorways shape the sociology of cities
Motorways shape the sociology of cities
Researchers from the UNIGE and USI have analysed the impact of the Swiss motorway network on the evolution of household composition among the country's municipalities. The development of transport infrastructure is a central issue for states, which spend billions to connect cities. But what is their real effect on the municipalities concerned? Researchers from the University of Geneva and the Università della Svizzera italiana (USI) looked at the evolution of the income composition of the population of cities in Switzerland once they are connected to the motorway network.

Environment - Life Sciences - 02.11.2021
Discover the underwater world
Discover the underwater world
Our lakes, rivers and streams are teeming with the smallest creatures, plants and bacteria that are barely visible to the naked eye, if at all. An underwater camera makes it possible to observe and identify the species of these creatures in real time. "Wow, that's so beautiful!" - Children and adults were audibly enthralled by images from the Eawag underwater camera Aquascope during the "Science City 2019 Meeting Point" exhibition at the ETH Zurich.

Computer Science - 02.11.2021
How words acquire their meaning
How words acquire their meaning
Researchers in EPFL's College of Humanities have used machine learning to reveal how humans bridge the often-significant gaps between signal and meaning in communication. Robert Lieck and Martin Rohrmeier of the Digital and Cognitive Musicology Laboratory (DCML) used machine learning and artificial intelligence to explore the alignments and misalignments between signals - such as words and gestures - and meaning in communication.

Earth Sciences - 01.11.2021
The silent build-up to a super-eruption
The silent build-up to a super-eruption
Geologists from the UNIGE and Peking University have developed a technique that makes it possible to estimate the maximum size of a future super-eruption of Toba volcano in Sumatra. It is estimated that about 5-10 volcanoes worldwide are capable of producing a super-eruption that could catastrophically affect global climate.

Life Sciences - 29.10.2021
Anxiety and the brain’s perception of inner-body signals
Using novel technology, researchers advance our understanding of anxiety's connection to brain-body interactions. For the first time, they show how the brain perceives and predicts altered states of breathing; quantifying links between anxiety and the brain's perception of the body's inner signals. Racing heart, rapid breathing, and sweaty palms - all symptoms of anxiety, but they are also the brain's way of preparing the body for a potential threat.

Life Sciences - 29.10.2021
The delicate dance of developmental genes
The delicate dance of developmental genes
Using CRISPR technology, researchers at EPFL and the University of Geneva have uncovered the complex dance of genes involved in embryonic development. The rapid scientific advancements that followed the mapping of the human genome have revealed just how staggeringly complex the world of genetics is.

Environment - Politics - 29.10.2021
Why biodiversity policy has yet to get off the ground
Why biodiversity policy has yet to get off the ground
Whether a hydroelectric power plant is built, a pesticide is banned or a moor is placed under protection - a wide variety of political decisions have an impact on biodiversity. But does biodiversity play any role at all in such decisions? Researchers at Eawag and WSL have investigated this question and examined Swiss policy over the past 20 years.

Health - Pharmacology - 28.10.2021
'I don't like dogmas much'
’I don’t like dogmas much’
These days, the cause of death in cancer patients often isn't the primary tumour, but metastases. With his research, biochemist Nicola Aceto has found a new way to prevent the formation of such secondary tumours. To achieve this, the Latsis laureate had to repeatedly fight against the prevailing wisdom.

Innovation - Campus - 27.10.2021
A small house raises big questions
A small house raises big questions
Buildings that own and run themselves: this idea, from the think-tank Dezentrum, was put into action for the first time at ETH Zurich in the form of a prototype. The result is a meditation cabin that shakes up the usual economic and social expectations. The outward appearance of the small, prism-shaped hut in the recently opened Student Project House on ETH's Zentrum campus is enough to arouse the curiosity of anyone looking at it.

Astronomy / Space Science - 27.10.2021
The upside-down orbits of a multi-planetary system
The upside-down orbits of a multi-planetary system
Astronomers led by the UNIGE have discovered exoplanets that orbit in planes at 90 degrees from each other. When planets form, they usually continue their orbital evolution in the equatorial plane of their star. However, an international team, led by astronomers from the University of Geneva , Switzerland, has discovered that the exoplanets of a star in the constellation Pisces orbit in planes perpendicular to each other, with the innermost planet the only one still orbiting in the equatorial plane.

Life Sciences - 26.10.2021
The young plant's pantry does more than just feed it
The young plant’s pantry does more than just feed it
A team from the University of Geneva has observed that the role of plant tissue - called endosperm - is not only to feed the seed but is crucial for the development and protection of young plants. The endosperm, the tissue surrounding the plant embryo in the seed, has long been perceived as a nourishing tissue that is abandoned once the transition to the seedling is complete.

Environment - Chemistry - 26.10.2021
Fish are being increasingly exposed to endocrine disrupters
Fish are being increasingly exposed to endocrine disrupters
Microplastics, owing to their chemical properties, can carry micropollutants into a fish's digestive system where they are subsequently released through the action of its gastric and intestinal fluids. Scientists of EPFL and Eawag, working in association with other research institutes, have studied this process by looking specifically at progesterone - often pointed to as an endocrine disrupter.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 26.10.2021
Fossil rivers of the Sahara tell of the threat of warming
Fossil rivers of the Sahara tell of the threat of warming
A UNIGE-led team has studied the fossil rivers of the Egyptian Sahara to reconstruct the region's rainfall rates that led to a major migration of people away from the Nile valley 10,000 years ago. Why did the people living near the Nile river migrate to central Egypt 10,000 years ago, when the Egyptian Sahara was still green? Geologists led by the University of Geneva , Switzerland, have studied the fossil rivers north of Lake Nasser in Egypt in order to reconstruct the palaeo-hydrology of the region and to determine the rainfall rate of this African humid period.

Health - Life Sciences - 25.10.2021
S-acylation enhances COVID-19 infection
S-acylation enhances COVID-19 infection
Like many viruses, SARS-CoV-2 relies on lipid modifications carried by host enzymes to organize their membrane structure and coordinate the function of virulence proteins. Scientists at EPFL have discovered the enzymes that transfer fatty acids to one of the main components of SARS-CoV-2, its fusion protein Spike.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.10.2021
Fighting multiple sclerosis with cold
Fighting multiple sclerosis with cold
Scientists from the University of Geneva are demonstrating how cold could alleviate the symptoms of multiple sclerosis by depriving the immune system of its energy. In evolutionary biology, the "Life History Theory", first proposed in the 1950s, postulates that when the environment is favourable, the resources used by any organism are devoted for growth and reproduction.

Pharmacology - Health - 22.10.2021
Mechanism Behind Ineffective Psoriasis Drugs Identified
Mechanism Behind Ineffective Psoriasis Drugs Identified
Interleukin-12 - a messenger molecule of immune cells - was long considered to trigger the development of psoriasis. Now, researchers at the University of Zurich have shown that interleukin-12 does not actually cause the skin disease but protects against it. This also explains why common psoriasis drugs that block the messenger show insufficient treatment efficacy.