news 2021


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Results 81 - 100 of 553.


Microtechnics - 07.10.2021
Flying High-Speed Drones into the Unknown with AI
Flying High-Speed Drones into the Unknown with AI
Researchers at the University of Zurich have developed a new approach to autonomously fly quadrotors through unknown, complex environments at high speeds using only on-board sensing and computation. The new approach could be useful in emergencies, on construction sites or for security applications. When it comes to exploring complex and unknown environments such as forests, buildings or caves, drones are hard to beat.

Health - Pharmacology - 07.10.2021
Financial rewards lead to higher vaccination uptake
Modest financial rewards can help increase COVID-19 vaccination rates. This is the conclusion of an international study co-lead by Swiss universities, based on data from Sweden. Despite countless appeals from politicians and scientists, stagnating vaccination rates hamper the containment of coronavirus.

Materials Science - Architecture - 06.10.2021
Light construction, efficient operation
Light construction, efficient operation
Boasting an intricate, doubly curved concrete roof, lightweight funicular floors, and self-learning building technology, the latest addition to Empa and Eawag's NEST research building in Duebendorf, Switzerland officially opened today. The innovative unit illustrates nearly a decade of formative ETH Zurich research in architecture and sustainable technologies.

Social Sciences - Health - 06.10.2021
Mindfulness meditation helps preterm-born adolescents
Mindfulness meditation helps preterm-born adolescents
The practice of mindfulness shows a positive impact of the intervention on the adolescents' everyday life and on their ability to react to new events. Adolescents born prematurely present a high risk of developing executive, behavioural and socio-emotional difficulties. Now, researchers from Geneva University Hospitals (HUG) and the University of Geneva have revealed that practicing mindfulness may help improve these various skills.

Life Sciences - Health - 06.10.2021
War in the gut: How human microbiota resist the cholera bacterium
War in the gut: How human microbiota resist the cholera bacterium
Bacteria in the human gut go to war in order to protect themselves against attacks of the "spear-wielding" cholera bacterium Vibrio cholerae or other pathogens, an EPFL study has found. Image: V. cholerae's growth and competition on natural surfaces (left). The framed area is zoomed-in on the right and shows the killing of a bacterium (indicated by the red arrow) by the two V. cholerae cells.

Computer Science - 05.10.2021
Worm atlas could help crack mysteries in animal evolution
Worm atlas could help crack mysteries in animal evolution
Researchers in the Friedrich group have contributed to create an atlas that links subcellular structures to gene expression in each cell of the sea worm Platynereis dumerilii , a key model organism for the study of development and evolution. The atlas will help researchers to shed light onto molecular and cellular mechanisms at play in our very ancient ancestors.

Health - Life Sciences - 05.10.2021
Simultaneous optical and electrical tracking of heart activity
Simultaneous optical and electrical tracking of heart activity
It is still elusive to what extent interactions between different cell types of the heart influence the normal heart rhythm and possibly trigger life-threatening arrhythmias. A new measurement method developed at the University of Bern combines for the first time optical and electrical recording of cardiac ventricular activation which, in conjunction with optogenetics, will permit finding comprehensive answers to these questions.

Health - Physics - 05.10.2021
Next-generation camera can better locate tumors
Next-generation camera can better locate tumors
Scientists at EPFL and Dartmouth College in the US have developed a system that can, for the first time, both pinpoint the exact location of a tumor and measure its depth. Their technology employs a high-tech camera developed at EPFL's Advanced Quantum Architecture Laboratory. A few years ago, Edoardo Charbon, an EPFL professor and head of the Advanced Quantum Architecture Laboratory, unveiled a new, ultra-high-power camera called SwissSPAD2.

Environment - Life Sciences - 05.10.2021
The role of adaptive evolution in ecosystem collapse and recovery
The role of adaptive evolution in ecosystem collapse and recovery
Evolution plays a crucial role in ecosystem tipping points, as shown in two recently published studies by researchers. If this influence is taken into account, ecosystem collapses can be better predicted in the future. At the same time, the studies reveal how the risk of ecosystem collapse can be reduced and the chances of recovery increased.

Transport - Environment - 04.10.2021
Transport pricing in practice
Transport pricing in practice
In the largest worldwide pricing experiment to date, researchers have demonstrated that road users change their behavior when they must pay for the social and environmental effects of their transportation. The study was led by researchers from the University of Basel, ETH Zurich and ZHAW. Transportation causes a variety of costs that individual road users do not have to pay themselves.

Physics - Chemistry - 01.10.2021
Extending the power of attosecond spectroscopy
Extending the power of attosecond spectroscopy
Scientists at EPFL have shown that the powerful transient absorption spectroscopy technique can unravel ultrafast motion of electrons and nuclei in a molecule in real time and with atomic spatial resolution. The last few decades have seen impressive progress in laser-based technologies, which have led to significant advancements in atomic and molecular physics.

Life Sciences - Health - 01.10.2021
A single gene can disrupt the sleep-wake cycle
A single gene can disrupt the sleep-wake cycle
A team from the University of Geneva has identified a gene that is essential for regulating the sleep-wake cycles of Drosophila. All living organisms are subject to an internal biological rhythm, which controls many physiological processes. In humans in particular, this internal clock follows a 24-hour cycle and occurs even in the absence of external triggers, such as changes in light or temperature.

Computer Science - Life Sciences - 01.10.2021
Deep-learning-based image analysis is now just a click away
Deep-learning-based image analysis is now just a click away
Under an initiative by EPFL's Center for Imaging, a team of engineers from EPFL and Universidad Carlos III de Madrid have developed a plugin that makes it easier to incorporate artificial intelligence into image analysis for life-science research. The plugin, called deepImageJ, is described in a paper appearing today.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 01.10.2021
A tool to interrogate a new class of drugs
Reactive electrophilic drugs like Tecfidera, approved for the treatment of relapsing multiple sclerosis, show a lot of potential but are also mystery. Their effects are notoriously difficult to study, which hampers progress testing and approving them. scientists have now used an innovative chemical method to uncover the biological mechanisms of Tecfidera, providing a powerful tool for exploring other reactive electrophilic drugs.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 30.09.2021
Relieving pain by mapping its biological signatures
Relieving pain by mapping its biological signatures
Researchers at the University of Geneva and the Clinique romande de réadaptation in Sion have mapped the biomarkers of different types of pain to categorise and better treat them in the future. Many people are confronted with chronic pain that can last for months or even years. How to best treat chronic pain? First, pain must be categorized for the right treatment to be prescribed.

Environment - Psychology - 30.09.2021
Successfully introducing innovations
Although the consequences of climate change are becoming more and more visible and tangible, the transition to climate-friendly energy systems is only proceeding slowly. In a field experiment, Eawag and the University of Groningen (NL) investigated what kind of measures could be used to better promote innovations such as heat pumps.

Environment - 30.09.2021
Commercially viable production of climate-neutral plastic is possible
By cleverly combining different technologies, manufacturers can produce plastic that is climate neutral over its entire life cycle. A new study by an international team of researchers has shown that this combination requires less energy than alternatives and costs the same - or even less. Since the early 1950s, plastics have found their way into almost every area of modern life.

Life Sciences - Health - 30.09.2021
New photoelectric implant controls the activity of spinal neurons
New photoelectric implant controls the activity of spinal neurons
A revolutionary implant developed at EPFL allows neuroscientists to activate or inhibit specific spinal-cord neurons by applying light at a specific wavelength. It will give researchers insight into how the nervous system works and the chance to develop new ways of treating neurological disorders. Grégoire Courtine doesn't hesitate to use the word "revolutionary" when describing the emerging field of optogenetics - a technology that uses pulses of light to control individual neural activity - and what it could mean for neuroscience.

Health - Psychology - 29.09.2021
An algorithm to predict psychotic illnesses
An algorithm to predict psychotic illnesses
Teams from the UNIGE and EPFL have used for the first time the method of longitudinal network analysis applied to children, in order to detect the symptoms that herald the development of psychotic illness in the future. One third of children with a microdeletion of chromosome 22 will later develop a psychotic illness such as schizophrenia.

Life Sciences - 29.09.2021
Robust gene networks from the depths of our evolutionary history
A sophisticated system guides the development of our limbs. Researchers at University of Basel have shed new light on the genetic toolkit used during evolution to create a range of different extremities such as fins, wings, hooves, toes and fingers. Much can go wrong when a fertilized egg develops into an embryo and ultimately gives rise to a newborn as mutations in the genome that affect development are relatively common.