news 2021


Category

Years
2021 | 2020 | 2019 | 2018 | 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008



Results 81 - 100 of 252.


Psychology - Campus - 30.03.2021
Cardiorespiratory fitness improves grades at school
Cardiorespiratory fitness improves grades at school
By confirming the link between children's cardiorespiratory fitness and their school results, researchers at the UNIGE underline the importance of physical education classes at school. Recent studies indicate a link between children's cardiorespiratory fitness and their school performance: the more athletic they are, the better their marks in the main subjects - French and mathematics.

Computer Science - 30.03.2021
Keeping an eye on systems
Even minor disruptions in infrastructure systems can have fatal consequences. Researchers and practitioners counter that risk by taking action on multiple levels. Four examples. Urban systems: increase resilience By trade, Bo¸idar Stojadinovic is an expert in earthquake-proof construction. Now a Professor of Structural Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering, he specialises in urban systems and how to make them more resilient to earthquakes.

Health - Life Sciences - 29.03.2021
Cells rely on their crampons to avoid slipping
Cells rely on their crampons to avoid slipping
Researchers from the University of Geneva identified a new function for a protein that helps cells to sense their environment and dock at their proper place in the body. Each human being is made of billions of cells. In order to ensure his survival, cells must coordinate with each other and attach in the right place to perform their tasks.

Environment - Social Sciences - 26.03.2021
Climate change significantly increases population displacement risk
Climate change significantly increases population displacement risk
The risk of people being forced from their homes by flooding increases by half for each additional degree of global warming, as an international research team led by the Weather and Climate Risks Group at ETH Zurich demonstrate. Every year, millions of people around the world are displaced from their homes due to severe weather caused by climate change.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 26.03.2021
AI provides debris flow warnings
AI provides debris flow warnings
When it comes to debris avalanches and mudslides, there is usually very little warning. Using seismic monitoring and machine learning, researchers from ETH Zurich and WSL have developed an alarm system that can provide early warning of debris flows at Illgraben. Debris flows are a mixture of boulders, sediments and water.

Electroengineering - Physics - 26.03.2021
New nanotransistors keep their cool at high voltages
New nanotransistors keep their cool at high voltages
Power converters play an essential role in electric vehicles and solar panels, for example, but tend to lose a lot of power in the form of heat in the electricity conversion process. Thanks to a new type of transistor developed at EPFL, these converters can perform at substantially improved efficiencies, especially in high-power applications.

Microtechnics - Art and Design - 26.03.2021
Contemplate the nature of robotics at EPFL Pavilions
Contemplate the nature of robotics at EPFL Pavilions
EPFL Pavilions re-opens its exhibition Nature of Robotics which offers perspective on robotics in a human and organic environment. At the entrance of Nature of Robotics a couple of robotic snails slither around the floor, leaving behind slimy trails. Two visitors, young boys, enter the exhibit and squat next to the slimy creatures, trying to follow both of them at once.

Social Sciences - 24.03.2021
Arguing with Strangers on the Internet
Arguing with Strangers on the Internet
Motivated by the goal of reducing the polarization of opinions online, new EPFL/UNIL research indicates that this may be far more difficult than expected, even when using liked or respected celebrities as spokespeople. Celebrities, thanks to their level of fame, are often considered to be influential and many have used their status to campaign for issues they believe to be important - consider Beyoncé's feminist activism or Leonardo DiCaprio's outspokenness on Climate Change.

Environment - Chemistry - 24.03.2021
Aerosol formation in clouds
Aerosol formation in clouds
Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI have studied for the first time how chemical reactions in clouds can influence the global climate. They found that isoprene, the dominant non-methane organic compound emitted into the atmosphere, can strongly contribute to the formation of organic aerosols in clouds.

Life Sciences - Health - 23.03.2021
Study suggests a promising future for soft bioelectronic interfaces in clinical settings
Study suggests a promising future for soft bioelectronic interfaces in clinical settings
Results demonstrate MRI compatibility, good surgical handling and reliable recording in bioelectronic interfaces that conform to the nervous system Geneva, Switzerland - A new study published in Advanced Science by researchers from the Laboratory of Soft BioElectronics Interfaces (LSBI) at EPFL, led by Prof. Stéphanie P. Lacour , has demonstrated MRI compatibility in their soft electrode arrays - a crucial step in translation to the clinic.

Physics - 23.03.2021
New Results Challenge Leading Theory in Physics
New Results Challenge Leading Theory in Physics
Researchers at CERN have just released new intriguing results. According to the international research collaboration that runs the Large Hadron Collider beauty (LHCb) experiment, the latest measurements strengthen hints for a deviation with respect to the theoretical expectations. If confirmed, the findings point towards physics beyond the Standard Model such as a new fundamental force.

Health - Social Sciences - 23.03.2021
Building resilience to COVID-19 and future pandemics
Building resilience to COVID-19 and future pandemics
An international team of scientists has drawn up a report on the resilience capacity needed by our societies to prevent, react to and recover from the COVID-19 crisis. The authors propose a path forward to shape resilient, inclusive, and sustainable societies. The COVID-19 pandemic triggered a global systemic crisis.

Computer Science - Physics - 23.03.2021
New high-performance computing hub aims to harness the sun's energy
New high-performance computing hub aims to harness the sun's energy
EPFL will soon be home to a European hub for high-performance computing focused on fusion power - a potential source of clean, risk-free energy. As part of this effort, EPFL's Swiss Plasma Center will lead a campus-wide, cross-disciplinary research team. EUROfusion - or the European Consortium for the Development of Fusion Energy, which consists of organizations from 28 European countries - has just selected EPFL as the site for its Advanced Computing Hub.

Materials Science - 23.03.2021
Knitting roads
Knitting roads
Empa scientists are investigating how roads could be reinforced with simple means and recycled easily after use. Their tools are a robot and a few meters of string. A robotic arm lays out a string in a mandala-like pattern on a bed of gravel. What appears to be a contemporary art performance is basic research that explores new ways in road construction.

Environment - 22.03.2021
A new dye shakes up solar cells
A new dye shakes up solar cells
Scientists have developed a new dye for solar cells that enables high power-conversion efficiency while being simple and cheap to make. The dye also works exceptionally well under low-light conditions, which is key for selfand low-powered devices. In 1991, scientists Brian O'Regan and Michael Grätzel at EPFL published a seminal paper describing a new type of solar cell: the dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC), also known as "Grätzel cell".

Health - Life Sciences - 22.03.2021
Lung cancer resistance: the key is glucose
Lung cancer resistance: the key is glucose
Lung tumors are home to immune cells that affect their growth and resistance to treatment. Looking at neutrophils, scientists led by EPFL have discovered that the key might lie in the cells' ability to metabolize glucose, opening an entirely new target for improving radiotherapy. Cancers are not only made of tumor cells.

Health - 19.03.2021
Novel Diagnostics to Improve Migrant and Refugee Health
Novel Diagnostics to Improve Migrant and Refugee Health
Swiss TPH is launching a new project on the development of an integrated infectious disease diagnosis and surveillance system (NIIDS) to improve migrant and refugee health. NIIDS will assess healthcare needs of migrants and refugees, as well as set up a platform to support the diagnosis and management of clinically relevant infectious diseases in these vulnerable populations.

Health - Chemistry - 19.03.2021
Particulates are more dangerous than previously thought
Particulates are more dangerous than previously thought
Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI have for the first time observed photochemical processes inside the smallest particles in the air. In doing so, they discovered that additional oxygen radicals that can be harmful to human health are formed in these aerosols under everyday conditions. They report on their results today .

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 19.03.2021
Revealing the way a critical enzyme works in the cell
Revealing the way a critical enzyme works in the cell
Combining structural biology, molecular simulations, mutagenesis, and in vivo assays, EPFL scientists have made the first extensive study of the mode of action of the enzyme acyl thioesterase, which regulates deacylation, one of the most critical functions of the cell. S'acylation is the process of chemically linking a lipid to protein via a thioester bond.

Life Sciences - 18.03.2021
Scaled, armoured or naked: how does the skin of fish evolve?
Scaled, armoured or naked: how does the skin of fish evolve?
Researchers at the UNIGE have traced the family tree of ray-finned fish in order to reconstruct the evolution of the protective structures of their skin. Usually scaled, the skin of fish can also be naked or made up of bony plates that form an armour, sometimes even covered with teeth. But how has this skin evolved over the ages? To answer this question, researchers at the University of Geneva , Switzerland, have reconstructed the evolution of the protective skin structures in fish, going back to the common ancestor of ray-finned fish, more than 420 million years ago.