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Pharmacology



Results 1 - 9 of 9.


Health - Pharmacology - 24.02.2021
Scientists model a peculiar type of breast cancer
Scientists model a peculiar type of breast cancer
Scientists led by EPFL have developed a breakthrough in vivo model for invasive lobular carcinoma, a serious yet understudied type of breast cancer. The work will open up previously inaccessible study of the tumor's biology and help discover new therapies. Invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) is a type of breast cancer that begins in the milk-producing glands (lobules) of the breast.

Pharmacology - 23.02.2021
Drug-checking services: effective approach to harm reduction
Drug-checking services: effective approach to harm reduction
Drug-checking services with substance analyses help reduce the risks associated with drug use. A study commissioned by the FOPH shows that this service helps protect users from overdoses and adverse reactions to adulterants. The study also underlines the potential of drug checking for identifying vulnerable individuals at an early stage and for monitoring the drug market.

Pharmacology - Health - 17.02.2021
Hide-and-Seek Can Lead to Higher Drug Prices
Pharmaceutical manufacturers and national authorities often negotiate secret rebates when determining drug prices. A UZH study shows that these rebate systems may hamper patient access to drugs. In the medium term, this practice can even lead to increasing drug prices. In Switzerland and other European countries, drug prices are regulated to ensure affordable access to drugs.

Health - Pharmacology - 03.02.2021
Artificial aorta can reduce patients' blood pressure
Artificial aorta can reduce patients' blood pressure
Engineers at EPFL's Center for Artificial Muscles have developed a silicone aorta that can reduce how hard patients' hearts have to pump. Their breakthrough could offer a promising alternative to heart transplants. "Over 23 million people around the world suffer from heart failure. The disease is usually treated with a transplant, but because donated hearts are hard to come by, there is an ongoing need for alternative therapies.

Health - Pharmacology - 03.02.2021
3D-printed bioresorbable airway stent
An ETH Zurich research team is using 3D printing to produce a new type of bioresorbable airway stent. This could greatly simplify the future treatment of upper airway obstruction. Narrowing of the trachea or the main bronchi due to injury or illness can end very badly. If patients get too little oxygen, they risk suffocating and often need medical help as quickly as possible.

Health - Pharmacology - 03.02.2021
Better poison dosages for better prostate cancer therapies
A given substance may be fundamental for life or may serve as a poison. All depends on the specific dose. At first glance, this somewhat paradoxical principle in medicine was first coined by the Swiss physician Paracelsus more than half a millennium ago when he stated: "All things are poison, and nothing is without poison.

Pharmacology - Health - 28.01.2021
New treatment helps patients with a spinal cord injury
Spinal cord injuries disrupt the mechanism by which our bodies regulate blood pressure. A team of Swiss and Canadian scientists have developed a treatment that allows patients to regain control of their blood pressure, using targeted electrical spinal-cord stimulation. No medication is required. The team's findings were published today in Nature.

Health - Pharmacology - 21.01.2021
Detailed tumour profiling
As part of a clinical study involving patients from the University Hospitals in Zurich and Basel, researchers are conducting a thorough and highly precise investigation into the molecular and functional properties of tumours. Their goal is to help physicians to better determine which treatment will best match every patient's cancer and thus be most effective.

Health - Pharmacology - 11.01.2021
Immune cells discovered in the lungs improve virus defense
Immune cells discovered in the lungs improve virus defense
A research team at the University of Basel has discovered immune cells resident in the lungs that persist long after a bout of flu. Experiments with mice have shown that these helper cells improve the immune response to reinfection by a different strain of the flu virus. The discovery could yield approaches to developing longer-lasting vaccinations against quickly-mutating viruses.