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Results 21 - 40 of 190.


Life Sciences - Health - 15.11.2021
A digital reconstruction of the brain's power source
A digital reconstruction of the brain's power source
The EPFL Blue Brain Project has created the first digital reconstruction of the Neuro-Glia-Vascular Architecture providing a new framework to study brain function in health and disease. The study, published in Cerebral Cortex, represents a major milestone: researchers can now reconstruct the architecture of non-neuronal entities such as blood vessels and the supporting cells called glia.

Life Sciences - 11.11.2021
How does a wing grow? A journey on the path of proteins
How does a wing grow? A journey on the path of proteins
To form an organ, cells must communicate properly and develop their number, shape and size down to the smallest detail. A research team at the University of Basel investigates wing growth in the fruit fly and now has refuted a long-standing dogma. Contrary to what was previously assumed, the team showed that the dispersal of a signalling molecule called Dpp is not responsible for the entire wing shape and size.

Life Sciences - Computer Science - 10.11.2021
When algorithms get creative
Uncovering the mechanisms of learning via synaptic plasticity is a critical step towards understanding how our brains function and building truly intelligent, adaptive machines. Researchers from the University of Bern propose a new approach in which algorithms mimic biological evolution and learn efficiently through creative evolution.

Life Sciences - Health - 09.11.2021
Brain connections have their own tempo
Brain connections have their own tempo
Scientists from the University of Geneva show that during development, the different populations of neurons needed for connections between brain areas share similar genetic programs, but which unfold at different speeds. The cerebral cortex, located at the surface of the brain, handles the cognitive, language, and complex functions that allow us to represent the world or project ourselves into the future.

Health - Life Sciences - 05.11.2021
New Insights into Kidney Disease with Tropical Frog Models
New Insights into Kidney Disease with Tropical Frog Models
Using cutting-edge genetic engineering, researchers have developed a model to study hereditary kidney disease with the help of tropical frogs. The method allows them to collect large amounts of data on anomalies, which can then be analyzed using artificial intelligence. The research opens up new opportunities in the search for new treatment approaches for the hitherto incurable disease.

Life Sciences - Environment - 03.11.2021
A natural CO2-sink thanks to symbiotic bacteria
A natural CO2-sink thanks to symbiotic bacteria
Like many land plants, seagrasses live in symbiosis with nitrogen-fixing bacteria. Researchers of the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen and Eawag now show that seagrass in the Mediterranean Sea lives in symbiosis with bacteria that reside in their roots and provide the nitrogen necessary for growth.

Environment - Life Sciences - 02.11.2021
Discover the underwater world
Discover the underwater world
Our lakes, rivers and streams are teeming with the smallest creatures, plants and bacteria that are barely visible to the naked eye, if at all. An underwater camera makes it possible to observe and identify the species of these creatures in real time. "Wow, that's so beautiful!" - Children and adults were audibly enthralled by images from the Eawag underwater camera Aquascope during the "Science City 2019 Meeting Point" exhibition at the ETH Zurich.

Life Sciences - 29.10.2021
Anxiety and the brain’s perception of inner-body signals
Using novel technology, researchers advance our understanding of anxiety's connection to brain-body interactions. For the first time, they show how the brain perceives and predicts altered states of breathing; quantifying links between anxiety and the brain's perception of the body's inner signals. Racing heart, rapid breathing, and sweaty palms - all symptoms of anxiety, but they are also the brain's way of preparing the body for a potential threat.

Life Sciences - 29.10.2021
The delicate dance of developmental genes
The delicate dance of developmental genes
Using CRISPR technology, researchers at EPFL and the University of Geneva have uncovered the complex dance of genes involved in embryonic development. The rapid scientific advancements that followed the mapping of the human genome have revealed just how staggeringly complex the world of genetics is.

Life Sciences - 26.10.2021
The young plant's pantry does more than just feed it
The young plant’s pantry does more than just feed it
A team from the University of Geneva has observed that the role of plant tissue - called endosperm - is not only to feed the seed but is crucial for the development and protection of young plants. The endosperm, the tissue surrounding the plant embryo in the seed, has long been perceived as a nourishing tissue that is abandoned once the transition to the seedling is complete.

Health - Life Sciences - 25.10.2021
S-acylation enhances COVID-19 infection
S-acylation enhances COVID-19 infection
Like many viruses, SARS-CoV-2 relies on lipid modifications carried by host enzymes to organize their membrane structure and coordinate the function of virulence proteins. Scientists at EPFL have discovered the enzymes that transfer fatty acids to one of the main components of SARS-CoV-2, its fusion protein Spike.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.10.2021
Fighting multiple sclerosis with cold
Fighting multiple sclerosis with cold
Scientists from the University of Geneva are demonstrating how cold could alleviate the symptoms of multiple sclerosis by depriving the immune system of its energy. In evolutionary biology, the "Life History Theory", first proposed in the 1950s, postulates that when the environment is favourable, the resources used by any organism are devoted for growth and reproduction.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.10.2021
The human immune system is an early riser
The human immune system is an early riser
Swiss and German scientists show that activation of the immune system oscillates throughout the day, with a peak just before the start of the day. Circadian clocks, which regulate most of the physiological processes of living beings over a rhythm of about 24 hours, are one of the most fundamental biological mechanisms.

Life Sciences - Health - 18.10.2021
New active agent against parasites
New active agent against parasites
Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI have identified a chemical compound that may be suitable as an active agent against several different unicellular parasites. Among these are the pathogens that cause malaria and toxoplasmosis. The point of attack for this promising substance is the protein tubulin: It helps cells divide and therefore is essential for the multiplication of the parasites.

Environment - Life Sciences - 15.10.2021
Plankton head polewards
Ocean warming caused by anthropogenic greenhouse-gas emissions will prompt many species of marine plankton to seek out new habitats, in some cases as a matter of sur-vival. researchers expect many organisms to head to the poles and form new communities - with unforeseeable consequences for marine food webs.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.10.2021
A cryptography game-changer for biomedical research at scale
Personalized medicine is set to revolutionize healthcare, yet large-scale research studies towards better diagnoses and targeted therapies are currently hampered by data privacy and security concerns. New global collaborative research has developed a solution to these challenges, described. Predictive, preventive, personalized and participatory medicine, known as P4, is the healthcare of the future.

Life Sciences - Health - 06.10.2021
War in the gut: How human microbiota resist the cholera bacterium
War in the gut: How human microbiota resist the cholera bacterium
Bacteria in the human gut go to war in order to protect themselves against attacks of the "spear-wielding" cholera bacterium Vibrio cholerae or other pathogens, an EPFL study has found. Image: V. cholerae's growth and competition on natural surfaces (left). The framed area is zoomed-in on the right and shows the killing of a bacterium (indicated by the red arrow) by the two V. cholerae cells.

Health - Life Sciences - 05.10.2021
Simultaneous optical and electrical tracking of heart activity
Simultaneous optical and electrical tracking of heart activity
It is still elusive to what extent interactions between different cell types of the heart influence the normal heart rhythm and possibly trigger life-threatening arrhythmias. A new measurement method developed at the University of Bern combines for the first time optical and electrical recording of cardiac ventricular activation which, in conjunction with optogenetics, will permit finding comprehensive answers to these questions.

Environment - Life Sciences - 05.10.2021
The role of adaptive evolution in ecosystem collapse and recovery
The role of adaptive evolution in ecosystem collapse and recovery
Evolution plays a crucial role in ecosystem tipping points, as shown in two recently published studies by researchers. If this influence is taken into account, ecosystem collapses can be better predicted in the future. At the same time, the studies reveal how the risk of ecosystem collapse can be reduced and the chances of recovery increased.

Life Sciences - Health - 01.10.2021
A single gene can disrupt the sleep-wake cycle
A single gene can disrupt the sleep-wake cycle
A team from the University of Geneva has identified a gene that is essential for regulating the sleep-wake cycles of Drosophila. All living organisms are subject to an internal biological rhythm, which controls many physiological processes. In humans in particular, this internal clock follows a 24-hour cycle and occurs even in the absence of external triggers, such as changes in light or temperature.