news 2022

Categories


Years
2008 | 2009 | 2010 | 2011 | 2012 | 2013 | 2014 | 2015 | 2016 | 2017 | 2018 | 2019 | 2020 | 2021 | 2022 | 2023 | 2024 |



Results 41 - 60 of 527.


Physics - Innovation - 01.12.2022
Photonics chip allows light amplification
Photonics chip allows light amplification
Scientists at EPFL have developed photonic integrated circuits that demonstrated a new principle of light amplification on a silicon chip. It can be employed for optical signals like those used in Lidar, trans-oceanic fiber amplifiers or in data center telecommunications. The ability to achieve quantum-limited amplification of optical signals contained in optical fibers is arguably among the most important technological advances that are underlying our modern information society.

Research Management - 30.11.2022
Open Science: data sharing struggling
Open Science: data sharing struggling
Despite mandatory data sharing policies adopted by some scientific journals, the potential for reuse of these data remains limited. This is the finding of a meta-research on open science undertaken by Dominique Roche, postdoctoral fellow in biology at the University of Neuchâtel. Open science is a worldwide movement to make scientific research and its data transparent and accessible to all.

Environment - 30.11.2022
Reliable planning tool for the emissions path to achieving the Paris temperature goal
Reliable planning tool for the emissions path to achieving the Paris temperature goal
Researchers at the University of Bern have developed a new method for the successive calculation of the emission reductions which are necessary for achieving temperature targets, such as the 2°C goal. The calculation method is based solely on observation rather than models and scenarios. According to the study, international climate policy has to become even more ambitious.

Pedagogy - 29.11.2022
Cognitive flexibility enhances mathematical reasoning
Cognitive flexibility enhances mathematical reasoning
A team from the University of Geneva shows that using different points of view on a problem helps improve students'proportional reasoning.

Health - Materials Science - 29.11.2022
A sensitive drill
A sensitive drill
Hearing-impaired people whose auditory nerve is still intact can often be helped with a cochlear implant. But inserting the implant into the inner ear is not without risks, as facial nerves can be damaged in the process. researchers have developed a novel smart drill that minimizes the risk by automatically shutting off when it comes near nerves.

Astronomy / Space - Physics - 29.11.2022
Small asteroids are probably young
Small asteroids are probably young
The impact experiment conducted on the asteroid Ryugu by the Japanese Hayabusa2 mission which took place two years ago resulted in an unexpectedly large crater. With the use of simulations, a team led by the University of Bern and the National Center of Competence in Research (NCCR) PlanetS has recently succeeded in gaining new insights from the experiment regarding the formation and development of asteroids.

Social Sciences - Psychology - 28.11.2022
Why we display belonging on Social Media
Why we display belonging on Social Media
Previous research on social media has mainly focused on how often people use it. Researchers from the University of Basel and the University of Koblenz-Landau have developed a new construct for measuring why people spend so much time on these platforms - and what content they post. November 2022 Are you the sort of person who likes to post photos on Instagram or Facebook and tag people in them? Do you frequently add things like "#bestfriends" or "BFFs"- If so, you probably have a high level of DTBP, or desire to belong publicly.

Economics - Environment - 24.11.2022
Smartphone banks compete with traditional banks for business
Smartphone banks compete with traditional banks for business
One in ten people in Switzerland already uses a smartphone bank. Although such neo-banks have so far only been used as secondary and third-party banks, they could also challenge the established banks' status as principal bankers in the future. This is the result of a study by the Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts on the Swiss retail banking market.

Health - Pharmacology - 24.11.2022
Protein shapes indicate Parkinson’s disease
Researchers have found that a set of proteins have different shapes in the spinal fluid of healthy individuals and Parkinson's patients. These could be used in the future as a new type of biomarker for this disease. Many human diseases can be detected and diagnosed using biomarkers in blood or other body fluids.

Environment - 24.11.2022
Pollution of the Glatt by trace substances is decreasing
Pollution of the Glatt by trace substances is decreasing
Together with the Canton of St. Gallen, Eawag has been investigating the impact of the expansion of the wastewater treatment plant at Flawil to include a stage for the removal of micropollutants on water quality in the River Glatt. Initial results now show a very positive picture. The expansion of the Oberglatt WWTP in Flawil with an additional treatment stage to remove micropollutants is having an effect.

Social Sciences - 24.11.2022
Girls are trendsetters on social networks
Girls are trendsetters on social networks
When it comes to widely used social networks, girls set the trends. They join new social networks earlier than boys, as the JAMES 2022 study by ZHAW and Swisscom shows.

Environment - Chemistry - 24.11.2022
Unraveling the secrets of microplastics released by tires
Unraveling the secrets of microplastics released by tires
In Switzerland, tire and road wear particles are one of the biggest sources of microplastics released into the environment, yet the chemical compounds contained in those particles - and their effects - remain largely a mystery. To remedy that knowledge gap, scientists at EPFL and two other Swiss research institutes are conducting a study of the toxicity of tire-particle compounds and how readily they're absorbed by living organisms.

Physics - Electroengineering - 23.11.2022
Spin correlation between paired electrons demonstrated
Spin correlation between paired electrons demonstrated
Physicists at the University of Basel have experimentally demonstrated for the first time that there is a negative correlation between the two spins of an entangled pair of electrons from a superconductor. For their study, the researchers used spin filters made of nanomagnets and quantum dots, as they report in the scientific journal Nature.

Chemistry - Environment - 22.11.2022
Chemicals could undercut global plastics treaty
Chemicals could undercut global plastics treaty
Next week the UN intergovernmental negotiating committee (INC) on plastic pollution will meet in Uruguay to develop an international legally binding instrument against plastic pollution. There is concern among scientists that the negotiations will overlook the diversity and complexity of chemicals present in plastics.

Life Sciences - 22.11.2022
Genes and Languages
Genes and Languages
Does the history of our languages match the history of our genes? A team of scientists at the University of Zurich and the Max-Planck-Institute have revealed a large number of matches - but also widespread mismatches in around 20 percent of cases, including in Malta, Hungary and Namibia. More than 7,000 languages are spoken in the world.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.11.2022
Covid-19: the Spike protein is no longer the only target
Covid-19: the Spike protein is no longer the only target
A research team reveals a hidden cavity on a key SARS-CoV-2 protein to which drugs could bind. With the continuous emergence of new variants and the risk of new strains of the virus, the development of innovative therapies against SARS-CoV-2 remains a major public health challenge. Currently, the proteins that are on the surface of the virus and/or are involved in its replication are the preferred therapeutic targets, like the Spike protein targeted by vaccines.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.11.2022
Scientists unlock nature's secret to super-selective binding
Scientists unlock nature's secret to super-selective binding
Researchers have discovered that it is not just molecular density, but also pattern and structural rigidity, that control super-selective binding interactions between nanomaterials and protein surfaces. The breakthrough could help optimize existing approaches to virus prevention and cancer detection.

Innovation - Environment - 22.11.2022
The Swiss water turnaround: wait and see or take a proactive approach?
The Swiss water turnaround: wait and see or take a proactive approach?
New technologies in the water sector can contribute to the flexible and sustainable development of urban water management and the sustainable utilisation of water as a resource. In a recent article in the journal Aqua & Gas, a team of researchers from the aquatic research institute Eawag shows what opportunities and risks are associated with this.

Astronomy / Space - Chemistry - 22.11.2022
James Webb reveals the atmospheric secrets of an exoplanet
James Webb reveals the atmospheric secrets of an exoplanet
Thanks to the James Webb Space Telescope, an international team including scientists is building a complete picture of the atmosphere of the planet WASP-39b. The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and its unparalleled images of our Universe offer us a new first: by combining several instruments, it draws a molecular and chemical portrait of the atmosphere of the exoplanet WASP-39b.

Physics - Electroengineering - 21.11.2022
A twin pack of cooled nanoparticles
A twin pack of cooled nanoparticles
Researchers at ETH have developed a technique to cool several nanoparticles simultaneously to temperatures of just a few thousandths of a degree above absolute zero. This new method can be used to study quantum effects of several nanoparticles and to build highly sensitive sensors. Over the past forty years, physicists have learned to cool increasingly large objects down to temperatures close to the absolute zero: atoms, molecules and, more recently, also nanoparticles consisting of billions of atoms.