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Results 41 - 60 of 67.


Environment - Transport - 07.04.2022
On the way to climate-neutral road traffic
On the way to climate-neutral road traffic
If 60% of the conventional gasolineand diesel-powered passenger cars in Switzerland were to be converted to "electricity-based" vehicles by 2050, i.e.

Life Sciences - Environment - 07.04.2022
Role of fish in mixing and spreading nutrients in coastal waters revealed
Role of fish in mixing and spreading nutrients in coastal waters revealed
A new study has shown how fish influence oceans- ecosystems in coastal regions, revealing for the first time the role they play in distributing heat, nutrients and oxygen that keep the system functioning. Oceans are made up of multiple layers, ranging from lighter, warmer waters at the top to denser, cooler waters at the bottom.

Agronomy / Food Science - Environment - 05.04.2022
Hardy Grazing Livestock: Protectors of the Mountain Landscape
Hardy Grazing Livestock: Protectors of the Mountain Landscape
Biodiverse mountain pastures are being overgrown by green alder shrubs. A study conducted by Agroscope and ETHZ shows that hardy sheep and goats can stop shrub encroachment. In particular, the traditional Engadine sheep has a taste for green alder. By debarking the shrub it damages it, thus preventing its spread and protecting valuable alpine pastures.

Computer Science - Environment - 04.04.2022
Gliding to Greater Sustainability
Gliding to Greater Sustainability
Imagine designing a robotic glider able to accelerate to 800km per hour using only the wind at its back. Combining passion with work, EPFL Professor Pascal Fua is leading research to develop the required capabilities, with important implications for sustainability. Head of EPFL's Computer Vision Laboratory (CV) in the School of Computer and Communication Sciences and a passionate gliding enthusiast, Pascal Fua always wanted to fly.

Environment - Life Sciences - 31.03.2022
A Single Gene Controls Species Diversity in an Ecosystem
A Single Gene Controls Species Diversity in an Ecosystem
To test if a single gene could affect an entire ecosystem, a research team of the University of Zurich conducted a lab experiment with a plant and its associated ecosystem of insects. They found that plants with a mutation at a specific gene foster ecosystems with more insect species. The discovery of such a -keystone gene- could change current biodiversity conservation strategies.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 29.03.2022
Restoring dammed rivers using artificial floods
Restoring dammed rivers using artificial floods
Naturally, water levels of rivers and streams are variable and fluctuate between drier and wetter periods. Spring snowmelt and the timing and location of rainfall events often drive these fluctuations, especially in alpine areas. Sediment and adsorbed nutrients are mobilised by flowing water and transported through river valleys.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 22.03.2022
'Groundwater, the invisible treasure'
’Groundwater, the invisible treasure’
Groundwater serves as drinking water for around half of the world's population and provides water for over 40 percent of the world's agriculture. So, there is no question that groundwater research plays an important role at Eawag. The aquatic research institute deals with groundwater quality, the regeneration of groundwater, geochemical processes in the subsurface and the treatment of groundwater to produce drinking water , both nationally and internationally.

Life Sciences - Environment - 18.03.2022
Genomics can help restore coral reefs in the Indian Ocean
Genomics can help restore coral reefs in the Indian Ocean
Two scientists are putting their expertise in coral reefs to work in Mauritius and Seychelles. The pair has joined a United Nations program that aims to restore reefs affected by human and environmental pressure using a method known as seascape genomics.

Environment - 17.03.2022
Making cities more livable
Making cities more livable
To meet the challenges in cities related to climate change and increasing urbanization, new approaches to transforming urban space are needed. One possibility are so-called Superblocks, large-scale city blocks with little or even no motorized through traffic inside them. An Empa study has analyzed the potential of different cities to be redesigned according to this principle.

Environment - Chemistry - 01.03.2022
Scientists map Arctic aerosols to better understand regional warming
Scientists map Arctic aerosols to better understand regional warming
Scientists at EPFL and the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) have studied the chemical composition and origin - whether natural or anthropogenic - of aerosols in a region spanning from Russia to Canada. Their findings provide unique insights for helping researchers better understand climate change in the Arctic and design effective pollution-mitigation measures.

Life Sciences - Environment - 24.02.2022
Legacy of extinct species is retained in genomes of their extant relatives
Legacy of extinct species is retained in genomes of their extant relatives
The carefully labelled paper bags look fairly plain, but they are actually a piece of luck for research. They contain historical scale samples, collected on a regular basis from all Lake Constance whitefish species by fisheries authorities for more than 100 years to determine age and growth rates. David Frei, from Eawag's Fish Ecology and Evolution Department, was able to extract genetic material from these scales collected from whitefish that lived in Lake Constance around 90 years ago.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 11.02.2022
Studying clouds can provide deeper insight into climate change
Studying clouds can provide deeper insight into climate change
An international team of scientists conducted CALISHTO, a large-scale air measurement campaign in Greece last fall, with the goal of surveying, counting and characterizing the tiny particles and their impact on cloud formation. The goal is to incorporate this information in climate models for improved predictions of clouds, precipitation and climate.

Environment - Health - 11.02.2022
Multi-Insecticide Resistant Malaria Vectors Remain Susceptible to Malathion Insecticide
Multi-Insecticide Resistant Malaria Vectors Remain Susceptible to Malathion Insecticide
Insecticide resistant mosquitoes are a growing concern in malaria control. A study conducted by Swiss TPH and partners raises hope that multi-resistant malaria vectors remain largely susceptible to the insecticide malathion. By studying field mosquito populations in Côte d'Ivoire, the authors found that genes which cause resistance to the widely used pyrethroid insecticides likely increase susceptibility to malathion.

Environment - Materials Science - 11.02.2022
Solar and wind power are key to decarbonising Switzerland
Solar and wind power are key to decarbonising Switzerland
A team from the UNIGE and Empa demonstrate that a mix of photovoltaic and wind power is optimal for reducing the carbon footprint of Swiss electricity consumption . How can we reduce the carbon footprint of electricity consumption in Switzerland? The country relies on electricity imports from fossil fuel power plants, which are major emitters of greenhouse gases.

Environment - Computer Science - 09.02.2022
Artificial intelligence and big data can help preserve wildlife
Artificial intelligence and big data can help preserve wildlife
A team of experts in artificial intelligence and animal ecology have put forth a new, cross-disciplinary approach intended to enhance research on wildlife species and make more effective use of the vast amounts of data now being collected thanks to new technology. Their study appears today. The field of animal ecology has entered the era of big data and the Internet of Things.

Environment - 08.02.2022
Arctic Winter Warming Causes Cold Damage in the Subtropics of East Asia
Arctic Winter Warming Causes Cold Damage in the Subtropics of East Asia
Due to climate change, Arctic winters are getting warmer. An international study by researchers shows that Arctic warming causes temperature anomalies and cold damage thousands of kilometers away in East Asia. This in turn leads to reduced vegetation growth, later blossoming, smaller harvests and reduced CO2 absorption by the forests in the region.

Environment - Social Sciences - 08.02.2022
Citizen Science: Knowledge as a weapon in the fight for clean water
Citizen Science: Knowledge as a weapon in the fight for clean water
There is too much nickel, too much arsenic and far too much manganese. The research project by Désirée Ruppen, who is doing her doctorate at the aquatic research institute Eawag and the ETH Zurich, provides watertight proof for the first time of what everyone on the ground already knew. The Deka River in the Hwange district is heavily polluted by coal mining and the coal-fired power plant, and is a serious health risk for the people who drink its water or fish in it.

Innovation - Environment - 07.02.2022
Making installed train windows permeable to mobile-phone signals
Making installed train windows permeable to mobile-phone signals
EPFL spin-off nu glass has successfully tested a portable system that makes the window panes on railcars permeable to mobile communications. This can bring significant environmental and cost benefits to railway companies and mobile-phone operators, since they'll no longer have to install signal boosters to provide wireless connectivity for passengers.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 02.02.2022
The last ice age widened the Aare and Gürbe valleys
The last ice age widened the Aare and Gürbe valleys
A team led by the University of Bern was able to proof that the glaciers of the penultimate ice age ('Riss' glaciation) mainly eroded the bedrock between Thun and Bern, but that during the last glaciation (' Würm'- glaciation) glacial carving resulted in a widening and not in a further deepening of the valleys.

Life Sciences - Environment - 01.02.2022
Revealing the genetic code of Europe's species diversity
Revealing the genetic code of Europe’s species diversity
Like a building plan, reference genomes provide a nearly complete genetic code of an organism, acting as a representative example of the entire species. "Comparisons of other genome sequence data with such a reference genome allow, for example, to describe in detail the variety of genetic differences amongst individuals of a species," explains Philine Feulner, Group Leader of the Department of Fish Ecology and Evolution at Eawag.