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Health - 16.08.2022
Detecting diabetes among people at risk
Detecting diabetes among people at risk
A team from the UNIGE in collaboration with the HUG has discovered a molecule that can identify the development of diabetes before the first symptoms appear. Diabetes is a severe and growing metabolic disorder. It already affects hundreds of thousands of people in Switzerland. A sedentary lifestyle and an excessively rich diet damage the beta cells of the pancreas, promoting the onset of this disease.

Environment - Health - 16.08.2022
The unequal distribution of noise
The unequal distribution of noise
In cities, those who earn more are better able to protect themselves against noise and its associated health risks. This is shown by two new ETH studies conducted in Bern, Zurich, Hannover and Mainz. Too much noise is detrimental to health: it leads to sleep disorders, increased blood pressure and cardiovascular disease.

Health - Life Sciences - 05.08.2022
Hydrogel keeps vaccines alive
Hydrogel keeps vaccines alive
Most vaccines require constant refrigeration during shipment to remain effective. An international research team led by ETH Zurich has now developed a special hydrogel that vastly improves the shelf life of vaccines, even without refrigeration. The development could save many lives and lower the cost of cold chains.

Life Sciences - Health - 03.08.2022
Low addiction risk with medical use of ketamine
Low addiction risk with medical use of ketamine
By demonstrating that ketamine induces only a brief increase in dopamine and does not alter neuronal communication, a team from the UNIGE suggests that its therapeutic use may be safe. Commonly used in medicine as an anaesthetic, ketamine is also increasingly prescribed to relieve depressive symptoms.

Health - Life Sciences - 03.08.2022
First map of immune system connections reveals new therapeutic opportunities
First map of immune system connections reveals new therapeutic opportunities
Researchers of the Wellcome Sanger Institute and ETH Zurich have created the first full connectivity map of the human immune system, showing how immune cells communicate with each other and ways to modulate these pathways in disease. The immune system is made up of specialised cells, some of which individually travel through the body to scan for signs of injury or disease.

Health - Life Sciences - 02.08.2022
Improved COVID-19 vector vaccine candidate
Improved COVID-19 vector vaccine candidate
Scientists at the Institute of Virology and Immunology (IVI) and the University of Bern report on a Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV)-vectored COVID-19 vaccine candidate. Their work shows that intramuscular immunization of mice with VSV-vectored COVID-19 vaccines is inducing strong antibody responses against the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein if the vector has been complemented with a specific protein.

Health - Campus - 28.07.2022
Half of the population of Geneva have antibodies that neutralize the Omicron variants
Half of the population of Geneva have antibodies that neutralize the Omicron variants
A study by the HUG, the UNIGE and the EPFL shows that almost all Genevans (93.8%) have antibodies against SARS-CoV 2 but less than one in two (46.7%) have them against the BA.4/BA. Omicron sub-variants. A study by the Geneva University Hospitals (HUG), the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Geneva and the EPFL shows that almost all Genevans (93.8%) have antibodies against SARS-CoV 2, almost three quarters of whom acquired them through an infection.

Health - Innovation - 26.07.2022
Digital Tool Improves Quality of Care for Children
Digital Tool Improves Quality of Care for Children
Digital tools are critical to improve the care for sick children, particularly in resource-constrained settings. In a new study, Swiss TPH and partners were able to show the positive impact of a digital clinical decision support system on improving the management of childhood illness in primary care in Nigeria.

Health - Earth Sciences - 26.07.2022
Imaging the brain with ultrasound waves
Imaging the brain with ultrasound waves
As wave specialists, seismologists map the structure of planets from the information that seismic waves carry. Now, the team led by ETH professor Andreas Fichtner is also using this knowledge for medical imaging. Both ultrasound for medical imaging and seismology for imaging the Earth's interior measure the propagation of waves through matter.

Environment - Health - 20.07.2022
One step closer to providing customized climate control in the office
One step closer to providing customized climate control in the office
Researchers have shown that people's perception of office temperature can vary considerably. Personalized climate control could therefore help enhance workers' comfort - and save energy at the same time. Global warming means that heatwaves are becoming ever-more frequent. At the same time, we're in a global race against the clock to reduce buildings' energy use and carbon footprint by 2050.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.07.2022
Monitoring SARS-CoV-2 mutations thanks to wastewater sampling and bioinformatics
A study published today in Nature Microbiology highlights the great advantage of wastewater monitoring as being rapid, unbiased and cost-effective: the detection of genomic variants of SARS-CoV-2 in wastewater offers an early alert and can be based on fewer samples as compared to clinical samples. The bioinformatics tool developed by the groups of Niko Beerenwinkel and Tanja Stadler (ETH, Department of Biosystems Science and Engineering) in collaboration with Eawag and EPFL identifies variants of concern even at low abundance.

Health - Life Sciences - 15.07.2022
Diabetes: a step closer to a life without insulin
Diabetes: a step closer to a life without insulin
A team from the University of Geneva reveals how the S100A9 protein improves metabolism of insulin-dependent diabetics by avoiding the deleterious effects of insulin. People with a severe form of diabetes, where the beta cells of the pancreas do not produce or no longer produce enough insulin, have no choice but to inject themselves regularly with artificial insulin in order to survive.

Health - Innovation - 14.07.2022
The Right Environment for Fighting Cancer
The Right Environment for Fighting Cancer
Cancer immunotherapy is a successful form of treatment in oncology, but it doesn't work for every patient. One problem may be the lack of a specific type of immune cell in the tumor, researchers in the Department of Biomedicine at the University of Basel have found. The researchers were able to partially replace the cell's function using a signaling molecule.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.07.2022
Also dogs develop malignant lymphoma
Also dogs develop malignant lymphoma
A study conducted by scientists at the Institute of Oncology Research (IOR, affiliated with USI and a member of Bios+) in collaboration with researchers specialized in veterinary oncology at the Universities of Turin and Bologna, identified the most frequent mutations in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), one of the most frequent tumors in both humans and dogs, opening new therapeutic opportunities.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.07.2022
Severe flu risk as immune cells swap with age
Severe flu risk as immune cells swap with age
Researchers found that in mice, long-lived embryonic macrophages in the lungs die upon aging and during infection and are replaced by inflammatory bone marrow-derived macrophages. This causes severe disease progression when infected with viral flu. Lung infections with the influenza virus or a coronavirus more frequently result in severe disease progression in older people.

Life Sciences - Health - 07.07.2022
Copper leads to protein aggregation
Copper leads to protein aggregation
Copper exposure in the environment and the protein alpha-synuclein in the human brain could play an important role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. A team from Empa and the University of Limerick was able to show how the protein takes on an unusual shape when exposed to large amounts of copper ions.

Health - 06.07.2022
Gestures Can Improve Understanding in Language Disorders
When words fail, gestures can help to get the message across - especially for people who have a language disorder. An international research team has now shown that listeners attend the gestures of people with aphasia more often and for much longer than previously thought. This has implications for the use of gestures in speech therapy.

Life Sciences - Health - 06.07.2022
Making CRISPR hype more of a reality
The latest CRISPR-based genome editing systems function more like molecular taxis rather than a pair of molecular scissors. This makes them much safer for patients who will soon benefit from gene therapies, as Eric Aird explains. This year we celebrate 10 years of genome editing with CRISPR. The system is often referred to as molecular scissors, and this designation is quite accurate for its first applications.

Health - Pharmacology - 05.07.2022
How Omicron dodges the immune system
How Omicron dodges the immune system
By comparing the neutralisation capacity induced by the different variants of SARS-CoV-2, a team from the UNIGE and the HUG reveals the exceptional capacity of Omicron to evade our immunity. The current wave of COVID-19 highlights a particularly high risk of reinfection by the Omicron variant of SARS-CoV-2.

Health - Psychology - 01.07.2022
New Diagnosis for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
New Diagnosis for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
The World Health Organization (WHO) recently listed a new sibling diagnosis for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), termed complex post-traumatic stress disorder (CPTSD). An international team with the involvement of the University of Zurich has now summarized the symptoms of the long-awaited new diagnosis and issued guidelines for clinical assessment and treatment.
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