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Life Sciences - Health - 26.10.2022
A key regulator of cell growth deciphered
A key regulator of cell growth deciphered
A team from the University of Geneva has identified the structure of a protein complex controlling the activity of the major regulator of cell growth. The mTOR protein plays a central role in cell growth, proliferation and survival. Its activity varies according to the availability of nutrients and some growth factors, including hormones.

Life Sciences - Health - 25.10.2022
How a key immune protein is regulated in the cell
How a key immune protein is regulated in the cell
Scientists at EPFL have determined how a protein that is critical in our first line of immune defense is regulated in the cell to prevent autoinflammatory diseases. How does a cell "know" that it's infected? This is a key question for innate immunity, our first line of defense to any infection or injury, made up of cells that quickly identify pathogens, like viral DNA.

Health - Innovation - 21.10.2022
Flexible surgical needle offers enhanced precision
Flexible surgical needle offers enhanced precision
Engineers from EPFL and the University of Strasbourg have developed an innovative surgical needle whose trajectory can be corrected on the fly, thanks to a flexible tip controlled with a simple button. Intended for use in image-guided surgery, the needle offers greater precision in surgeon's movements and reduces the risk for patients.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.10.2022
How genes, sex, growth and age impact lifespan
How genes, sex, growth and age impact lifespan
Scientists led by groups at EPFL and the University of Tennessee Health Science Center (UTHSC) explore the elaborate interplay between genes, sex, growth, and age and how they influence variation in longevity. Their results point at fundamental processes of aging that help in improving human healthspan.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.10.2022
Discovery of a new antibiotic against resistant pathogens
Discovery of a new antibiotic against resistant pathogens
For a long time, antibiotics were considered a silver bullet against bacterial infections. Over time, many pathogens have adapted to resist antibiotics, so the search for new drugs is becoming increasingly important. An international team of researchers including scientists at the University of Basel, has now discovered a new antibiotic by computational analysis and deciphered its mode of action.

Life Sciences - Health - 07.10.2022
Zinc could treat a rare genetic disorder
Zinc could treat a rare genetic disorder
By deciphering mutations in the GNAO1 gene, which cause severe mental and motor disabilities, a team from the University of Geneva is showing how zinc could improve the brain defects at stake. Paediatric encephalopathies of genetic origin cause severe motor and intellectual disabilities from birth. One of these diseases, first identified in 2013, is caused by mutations in the GNAO1 gene.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.10.2022
Discovering New Cancer Treatments in the 'Dark Matter' of the Human Genome
Discovering New Cancer Treatments in the ’Dark Matter’ of the Human Genome
Researchers of the University of Bern and the Insel Hospital, University Hospital Bern, have developed a screening method to discover new drug targets for cancer treatment in the so-called -Dark Matter- of the genome. They applied their method to non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the greatest cancer killer for which effective therapies are urgently sought.

Psychology - Health - 06.10.2022
New function of the cerebellum
New function of the cerebellum
The cerebellum is known primarily for regulation of movement. Researchers at the University of Basel have now discovered that the cerebellum also plays an important role in remembering emotional experiences. The study appears in the journal PNAS. October 2022 Both positive and negative emotional experiences are stored particularly well in memory.

Health - Innovation - 06.10.2022
Researchers deliver science for humanitarian action
Researchers deliver science for humanitarian action
Using innovative technologies and scientific expertise to help people in need is the goal of the Engineering for Humanitarian Action initiative launched by the ICRC, ETH Zurich and EPFL in 2020. Six of the projects are already offering results for tangible improvements for the ICRC. "By highlighting key sustainability principles in a simple way, the tool will help us make more informed decisions when designing our construction projects," says ICRC's Pavlos Tamvakis.

Life Sciences - Health - 04.10.2022
The cell sentinel that neutralises hepatitis B
The cell sentinel that neutralises hepatitis B
A team from the University of Geneva deciphers the three-step mechanism that allows our body to defend itself against hepatitis B. Confocal microscopy images showing in the cell nucleus (blue), the recruitment of Smc5/6 (green) by SLF2 (red) into PML bodies. UNIGE - Laboratory of Professor Michel Strubin - Regulation of hepatitis B virus gene expression - Department of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine.

Life Sciences - Health - 26.09.2022
Genetic Defects Lead to Enamel Malformations
Genetic Defects Lead to Enamel Malformations
Mutations in a certain molecule result in severe damage in the structure and mineral composition of tooth enamel in mice, according to a study conducted at the UZH Center of Dental Medicine. The researchers combined genetic, molecular and imaging techniques. Enamel is the hardest organic tissue found in nature.

Life Sciences - Health - 22.09.2022
Protein scissors for more effective cancer treatment
Biologist Daniel Richter has developed a method that enables proteins to be linked to a drug molecule or biomarker with a high level of stability. He plans to use this method in the future to identify tumor cells and open the door to more effective cancer drugs. White surfaces, brightly colored liquids in glass containers and appliances that wouldn't look out of place in the average kitchen.

Health - Chemistry - 22.09.2022
Fighting fungal infections with metals
Fighting fungal infections with metals
An international collaboration led by researchers from the University of Bern and the University of Queensland in Australia has demonstrated that chemical compounds containing special metals are highly effective in fighting dangerous fungal infections. These results could be used to develop innovative drugs which are effective against resistant bacteria and fungi.

Health - Life Sciences - 21.09.2022
Researchers turn cancer cells into less harmful cell types
Researchers turn cancer cells into less harmful cell types
Cancer cells resemble stem cells in being extremely adaptable. University of Basel researchers have identified compounds that artificially mature breast cancer cells of the highly aggressive triple negative subtype and convert them to a state that resembles normal cells. Cancer occurs when cells grow uncontrollably and spread to other organs in the body.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.09.2022
Genetics and diet influence bile acid homeostasis
Genetics and diet influence bile acid homeostasis
Scientists have used a systems genetics approach to unravel novel genetic and environmental modulators of bile acid homeostasis. Their findings provide new insights into the regulatory mechanisms of bile acid homeostasis and may have implications for the treatment of metabolic diseases. Image: Circos plot summarizing the bile acid species quantified in different biological compartments, their changes, correlation and associations with quantitative trait loci in two different diets.

Health - 19.09.2022
Diabetes: when circadian lipid rhythms go wrong
Diabetes: when circadian lipid rhythms go wrong
A team from Geneva, Switzerland, shows that the disruption of lipid temporal profiles in type 2 diabetes stiffens the membrane of pancreatic endocrine cells, which could alter their function. Like all living beings, human physiological processes are influenced by circadian rhythms. The disruption of our internal clocks due to an increasingly unbalanced lifestyle is directly linked to the explosion in cases of type 2 diabetes.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.09.2022
Awakening 'dormant' cells to fight cancer
Awakening ’dormant’ cells to fight cancer
A team from the UNIGE and the HUG has succeeded in identifying a drug-targetable mechanism whose blockage reduces the capacity of melanoma cells to adapt and resist to treatment. The advent of small-molecule targeted therapies, a decade ago, revolutionized the treatment of metastatic melanoma, provided that the tumors carry the mutations to respond to these treatments.

Health - Innovation - 19.09.2022
Bone fragility: EU green light for new diagnostic tool
Bone fragility: EU green light for new diagnostic tool
A new device for diagnosing bone fragility invented by the HUG and the UNIGE has been approved for marketing in the European Economic Area and Switzerland. A new device for diagnosing bone fragility invented by the University Hospitals of Geneva (HUG) and the University of Geneva has been approved for marketing in the European Economic Area and Switzerland.

Health - Life Sciences - 16.09.2022
Science Publication: SARS-CoV-2 Genomic Surveillance in Africa
Science Publication: SARS-CoV-2 Genomic Surveillance in Africa
A new study in Science shows how the rapid expansion of genomic surveillance in Africa allowed the continent to describe the introduction and spread of SARS-CoV-2 variants in African countries. Swiss TPH contributed to these efforts as part of the SARS-CoV-2 surveillance programme in Equatorial Guinea.

Health - Life Sciences - 15.09.2022
Immunotherapy Reduces Lung and Liver Fibrosis in Mice
Immunotherapy Reduces Lung and Liver Fibrosis in Mice
Chronic diseases often lead to fibrosis, a condition in which organ tissue suffers from excessive scarring. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now developed an immunotherapy that specifically targets the cause - activated fibroblasts - while leaving normal connective tissue cells unharmed.