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Results 141 - 160 of 173.


Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 09.03.2022
Connecting stress, weight, and social anxiety in early adolescence
Scientists at EPFL have found a biological connection explaining why there is an increased predisposition to develop obesity and being less sociable in individuals that have experienced stress during early puberty. Between the end of childhood and the beginning of adolescence, there is a critical window of time referred to as -peripuberty-.

Life Sciences - 07.03.2022
Microbial cleaning crew scours sewage plants
Microbial cleaning crew scours sewage plants
Ciliates and rotifers are the 'cleaners' in sewage treatment plants. That is the result of a study by Jule Freudenthal and Kenneth Dumack from the University of Cologne's Institute of Zoology, together with their Swiss colleagues Feng Ju and Helmut Bürgmann from the aquatic research institute Eawag.

Life Sciences - Health - 07.03.2022
Astrocyte Networks in the Mouse Brain Control Spatial Learning and Memory
Astrocyte Networks in the Mouse Brain Control Spatial Learning and Memory
Astrocytes form large networks of interconnected cells in the central nervous system. When these cell-to-cell couplings are disrupted in the brain of adult mice, the animals are no longer able to store spatial information. The astrocytes network is thus essential for spatial learning and memory formation, as neuroscientists of the University of Zurich now show.

Life Sciences - Physics - 07.03.2022
Physics and biology explore together the mechanisms of life
Physics and biology explore together the mechanisms of life
Researchers created a model to disentangle how proteins are unevenly distributed in cells, a process at the very basis of the development of living beings. Each of our cells contains about 40 million proteins that together perform all the tasks the cell needs to survive. For a smooth action, the right proteins must be concentrated in specific amounts, at a specific time and at a specific location.

Innovation - Life Sciences - 04.03.2022
EPFL spin-off develops protein to boost immunotherapy
EPFL spin-off develops protein to boost immunotherapy
EPFL spin-off Leman Biotech has developed a protein that can improve the effectiveness of immunotherapy drugs used to treat some types of cancer. The firm has just completed its first funding round, in the amount of $11 million. Immunotherapy is a promising new weapon in the fight against some types of cancer.

Life Sciences - Health - 03.03.2022
Communication defect in psychotic disorders
Communication defect in psychotic disorders
Scientists at the University of Geneva demonstrate how a defect in communication between brain areas is linked to the onset of psychotic disorders. Deficits in the maturation of the gamma response to auditory stimulation in childhood and adolescence are predictive of the risk of developing psychotic disorders.

Life Sciences - Health - 01.03.2022
The role of lipids in the development of Alzheimer's disease
The role of lipids in the development of Alzheimer’s disease
A European consortium coordinated by UNIGE shows how a mutation in the APOE protein changes the lipid transport in the brain and could promote the arise of Alzheimer's disease. Neurons in the brain coexist with and rely on many other cell types to function properly. Astrocytes, which take their name from their star shape, ensure the survival of neurons by feeding and detoxifying them with the help of a multifunctional protein, APOE.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 28.02.2022
Familiar objects can prevent autism-like behaviors in mouse model
Familiar objects can prevent autism-like behaviors in mouse model
The emergence of autism traits can result from different factors, such as a person's environment and genetic background. FMI researchers and their Novartis collaborators showed that exposing mice with an autism mutation to a new environment can trigger autism-like behaviors — through faulty signaling in the brain.

Health - Life Sciences - 25.02.2022
Gut Microbiota Influences Treatment against Parasitic Worms
Gut Microbiota Influences Treatment against Parasitic Worms
Almost a quarter of the world's population is at risk of helminth infections and available treatment options are limited. Therefore, a better understanding of why anti-parasitic drugs fail in certain cases is crucial. A new study by Swiss TPH sheds light on how gut bacteria affect treatment outcomes against parasitic worms.

Life Sciences - Environment - 24.02.2022
Legacy of extinct species is retained in genomes of their extant relatives
Legacy of extinct species is retained in genomes of their extant relatives
The carefully labelled paper bags look fairly plain, but they are actually a piece of luck for research. They contain historical scale samples, collected on a regular basis from all Lake Constance whitefish species by fisheries authorities for more than 100 years to determine age and growth rates. David Frei, from Eawag's Fish Ecology and Evolution Department, was able to extract genetic material from these scales collected from whitefish that lived in Lake Constance around 90 years ago.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.02.2022
New Blood Marker Provides Insight into MS Disease Activity
New Blood Marker Provides Insight into MS Disease Activity
Nerve damage in multiple sclerosis can be detected via the concentration of neurofilament light chain in the blood. According to researchers from the University of Basel and University Hospital Basel, this neuron-specific protein provides valuable information on future disease course and the effectiveness of therapies.

Life Sciences - Health - 16.02.2022
Multiple Sclerosis: Study with Twins Untangles Environmental and Genetic Influences
Researchers at the University of Zurich and Munich's LMU Klinikum hospital have studied the immune system of pairs of monozygotic twins to identify the influence of the environment and of genetics in cases of multiple sclerosis. In the process, they may have discovered precursor cells of the disease-causing T cells.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 14.02.2022
DisCo: boosting the efficiency of single-cell RNA sequencing
DisCo: boosting the efficiency of single-cell RNA sequencing
Bioengineers at EPFL have found a way to radically increase the efficiency of single-cell RNA-sequencing, a powerful tool that can -read- the genetic profile of an individual cell. Single-cell RNA sequencing, or -scRNA-seq- for short, is a technique that allows scientists to study the expression of genes in an individual cell within a mixed population - which is virtually how all cells exist in the body's tissues.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.02.2022
IOR and IOSI gold medal in lymphomas
The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM), the world's leading medical journal, has entrusted the lymphoma group of the Institute of Oncological Research (IOR, affiliated to USI and member of Bios+) and the Oncological Institute of Southern Switzerland (IOSI, Ente Ospedaliero Cantonale) with the task of compiling a state-of-the-art report on malignant lymphomas.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 10.02.2022
Illuminating Real-Time Brain Dynamics of Neuropeptides with a Fluorescent Biosensor
Illuminating Real-Time Brain Dynamics of Neuropeptides with a Fluorescent Biosensor
Neuropeptides play fundamental roles in modulating cellular and circuit functions within the brain. One such signaling molecule - orexin - regulates arousal and wakefulness, and its failure can lead to constant daytime sleepiness (narcolepsy). University of Zurich researchers have now developed a fluorescent orexin biosensor to observe this molecule "live" in the living mouse brain.

Life Sciences - Physics - 10.02.2022
Cellular tornadoes sculpt our organs
Cellular tornadoes sculpt our organs
A team from the UNIGE has demonstrated that cells self-organise to generate forces that model the shapes of our tissues. How are the different shapes of our organs and tissues generated? To answer this question, a team from the University of Geneva , Switzerland, forced muscle cells to spontaneously reproduce simple shapes in vitro .

Health - Life Sciences - 04.02.2022
A bacteria-killing helper against hospital-acquired infections
Bacteriophages are viruses that look like lunar modules. But instead of landing peacefully on celestial bodies, they dock onto bacteria to destroy them a short time later. They need the bacteria as hosts in order to reproduce: By injecting their DNA, they make the bacteria produce new phages until they finally burst.

Life Sciences - Health - 03.02.2022
USI’s commitment to reducing and replacing animal testing
USI Pro-Rector for Research Prof. Patrick Gagliardini talks about USI's commitment to reduce, where possible, the use of animal experiments by replacing them with alternative models, bringing concrete examples of approaches to achieve this goal. USI has been actively involved in the Swiss 3R Competence Centre (3RCC) since its founding in 2018 and has recently renewed its commitment.

Health - Life Sciences - 03.02.2022
Early detection of dementia
Early detection of dementia
Alzheimer's and other dementias are among the most widespread diseases today. Diagnosis is complex and can often only be established with certainty late in the course of the disease. A team of researchers, together with clinical partners, is now developing a new diagnostic tool that can detect the first signs of neurodegenerative changes using a sensor belt.

Life Sciences - Environment - 01.02.2022
Revealing the genetic code of Europe's species diversity
Revealing the genetic code of Europe’s species diversity
Like a building plan, reference genomes provide a nearly complete genetic code of an organism, acting as a representative example of the entire species. "Comparisons of other genome sequence data with such a reference genome allow, for example, to describe in detail the variety of genetic differences amongst individuals of a species," explains Philine Feulner, Group Leader of the Department of Fish Ecology and Evolution at Eawag.