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Life Sciences - Health - 29.02.2024
The 'switch' that keeps the immune system from attacking the body
The ’switch’ that keeps the immune system from attacking the body
Scientists at EPFL uncover the mechanism by which cells mark the protein cGAS for degradation, which is critical in preventing the immune system from mistakenly attacking the body's own tissues. A microscopic battle rages in our bodies, as our cells constantly fend off invaders through our immune system, a complex system of cells and proteins designed to protect us from harmful pathogens.

Health - Innovation - 27.02.2024
Finding and blocking infection routes in hospitals
During the COVID-19 pandemic, hospitals often became hubs of infection. Researchers from ETH Zurich, EPFL and the ISI Foundation are developing a wearable tracking system for healthcare facilities that can identify the risks of infections. Initial tests in Switzerland and Africa show its potential. Hospital-acquired infections are an immense problem.

Health - Physics - 27.02.2024
Nanotweezers accelerate phage therapy
Nanotweezers accelerate phage therapy
Scientists at EPFL have developed a game-changing technique that uses light to manipulate and identify individual bacteriophages without the need for chemical labels or bioreceptors, potentially accelerating and revolutionizing phage-based therapies that can treat antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections.

Health - Life Sciences - 26.02.2024
Arterial Connections Improve Treatment Outcomes Following Stroke
Arterial Connections Improve Treatment Outcomes Following Stroke
Blood vessels that cross-connect adjacent arterial trees regulate blood flow to the brain in stroke patients. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now shown that these vessels prevent brain hemorrhage following treatment to remove blood clots. They play a crucial role in the recovery of stroke patients.

Health - Pedagogy - 26.02.2024
Anything-in-anything-out: a new modular AI model
Researchers at EPFL have developed a new, uniquely modular machine learning model for flexible decision-making. It is able to input any mode of text, video, image, sound, and time-series and then output any number, or combination, of predictions. We've all'heard of Large Language Models, or LLMs - massive scale deep learning models trained on huge amounts of text that form the basis for chatbots like OpenAI's ChatGPT.

Life Sciences - Health - 22.02.2024
Cracking the Code of Neurodegeneration
Cracking the Code of Neurodegeneration
Scientists at the University of Zurich have developed an innovative neural cell culture model, shedding light on the intricate mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration. Their research pinpointed a misbehaving protein as a promising therapeutic target in the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD).

Life Sciences - Health - 21.02.2024
Bio-inspired neuroprosthetics: sending signals the brain can understand
Bio-inspired neuroprosthetics: sending signals the brain can understand
Prostheses that connect to the nervous system have been available for several years. Now, researchers at ETH Zurich have found evidence that neuroprosthetics work better when they use signals that are inspired by nature. A few years ago, a team of researchers working under Professor Stanisa Raspopovic at the ETH Zurich Neuroengineering Lab gained worldwide attention when they announced that their prosthetic legs had enabled amputees to feel sensations from this artificial body part for the first time.

Life Sciences - Health - 16.02.2024
Protein modifications key influencers in neurodegenerative diseases
Protein modifications key influencers in neurodegenerative diseases
Exploring the post-translational modifications of a key protein in Parkinson's disease, researchers at EPFL and USC uncover potential pathways for future therapies in neurodegenerative diseases in general. Neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, present a significant health challenge, affecting over 50 million people globally.

Health - Life Sciences - 12.02.2024
Rare retinal diseases: detective work for the eyesight
Rare retinal diseases: detective work for the eyesight
A team at the Institute of Molecular and Clinical Ophthalmology Basel (IOB) and the University of Basel is hunting for the causes of hereditary retinal diseases.

Health - Life Sciences - 07.02.2024
Stress Influences Brain and Psyche Via Immune System
Stress Influences Brain and Psyche Via Immune System
Chronic stress affects the immune system and the brain. researchers now show that a particular enzyme found in cells of the immune system enters the brain under stress. In mice, it causes them to withdraw and avoid social contact. This newly discovered connection between body and mind in stress-related mental illnesses could lead to new treatments for depression.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.02.2024
A machine learning framework that encodes images like a retina
A machine learning framework that encodes images like a retina
Researchers have developed a machine learning approach to compressing image data with greater accuracy than learning-free computation methods, with applications for retinal implants and other sensory prostheses. A major challenge to developing better neural prostheses is sensory encoding: transforming information captured from the environment by sensors into neural signals that can be interpreted by the nervous system.

Physics - Health - 05.02.2024
Visualising multiple sclerosis with a new MRI procedure
Visualising multiple sclerosis with a new MRI procedure
The loss of myelin sheaths in the brain is a hallmark of multiple sclerosis. Researchers at ETH Zurich have now developed an MRI method that maps the condition of this nerve insulation layer more accurately than before. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a neurological disease that usually leads to permanent disabilities.

Health - Life Sciences - 01.02.2024
Resistant bacteria can remain in the body for years
Resistant bacteria can remain in the body for years
Fighting disease-causing bacteria becomes more difficult when antibiotics stop working. People with pre-existing conditions in particular can carry resistant germs and suffer from repeated infections for years, according to a study by the University and University Hospital of Basel. Pneumonia, urinary tract infections, sepsis: diseases like these can become fatal without antibiotics.

Life Sciences - Health - 01.02.2024
'Genomic time machine' reveals secrets of our DNA
’Genomic time machine’ reveals secrets of our DNA
Researchers reveal a novel method to uncover bits of our genetic blueprint that come from ancient genetic parasites, offering fresh insights into human evolution and health. The human genome, an intricate tapestry of genetic information for life, has proven to be a treasure trove of strange features.

Life Sciences - Health - 31.01.2024
Firing Nerve Fibers in the Brain Are Supplied with Energy on Demand
Firing Nerve Fibers in the Brain Are Supplied with Energy on Demand
To rapidly transmit electrical signals in the brain, the long nerve fibers are insulated by specialized cells called oligodendrocytes. These cells also respond to the electrical signals of active nerve fibers and provide them with energy on demand, as researchers have discovered. If this process, regulated by potassium, is disabled in mice, the nerve fibers are severely damaged as the animals age - resembling the defects of neurodegenerative diseases.

Health - 31.01.2024
COVID-19: How effective was contact tracing?
COVID-19: How effective was contact tracing?
Based on data from Geneva, Switzerland, a team from the University of Geneva and the HUG assessed the effectiveness of contact tracing in controlling the pandemic. During the COVID-19 pandemic, Switzerland, like many other countries, relied on contact tracing to identify people likely to have been contaminated by an infected acquaintance.

Health - 29.01.2024
Reducing Health Inequities in the Prevention of Cervical Cancer
Reducing Health Inequities in the Prevention of Cervical Cancer
Cervical cancer is the leading cause of cancer related deaths among women in sub-Saharan Africa. Women living with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are six times more likely to develop cervical cancer than those who are HIV negative. To tackle this issue, Swiss TPH together with partners developed the Cervical Cancer Prevention and Care Cascade - a framework to enhance cervical cancer screening programmes for women living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa.

Pharmacology - Health - 24.01.2024
Innovative dengue vaccine successfully tested
Innovative dengue vaccine successfully tested
Unisanté (University of Lausanne) has conducted a clinical study on a new type of vaccine that induces cellular immunity to combat dengue fever. The results have just been published in The Lancet eBioMedicine. They are positive and encourage further investigation. This approach is also promising for other diseases.

Health - History / Archeology - 24.01.2024
Syphilis-like diseases were already widespread in America before the arrival of Columbus
Syphilis-like diseases were already widespread in America before the arrival of Columbus
Researchers at the Universities of Basel and Zurich have discovered the genetic material of the pathogen Treponema pallidum in the bones of people who died in Brazil 2,000 years ago. This is the oldest verified discovery of this pathogen thus far, and it proves that humans were suffering from diseases akin to syphilis - known as treponematoses - long before Columbus's discovery of America.

Health - Environment - 23.01.2024
Heat islands have an impact on health costs
Heat islands have an impact on health costs
A new study has produced the first cost estimate of the impact that urban heat islands have on human health. The study looked at 85 European cities over the course of three full years, meaning it also took into account the protection that heat islands offer in winter - an aspect that has been little studied until now.



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