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Earth Sciences



Results 61 - 66 of 66.


Earth Sciences - 20.02.2012
Science of the stick-slip
Science of the stick-slip
Scientists have succeeded in modelling what happens when two bodies slide against each other and thereby release the pressure; a discovery that has implications for the understanding of the magnitude of earthquakes. David Kammer from EPFL has developed a digital model that explains what happens at the interface between two materials when they slide against each other; like a book on a table, rubber soles on linoleum, or - more to the point - tectonic plates.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 28.08.2011
Simulations to protect the Valais
Simulations to protect the Valais
Scientists model sediment deposits carried by the Naviscence River in the Swiss Valais canton. They are simulating possible scenarios for the future of the Zinal ski area, which could be threatened by the river.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 11.07.2011
From raindrop to flood
From raindrop to flood
Scientists are starting a new field campaign in the Val Ferret. They're collecting data to study how the environment influences flood rates in mountain valleys. Predicting natural disasters in order to inform and warn populations residing in risk zones is a major challenge today. “Mathematical models exist, but they still don't take into account all the data that are needed to establish reliable predictions, such as the influence of air temperature, the formation of thermal winds or the impact of precipitation,” explains Professor Marc Parlange.

Life Sciences - Earth Sciences - 04.08.2010
The oldest dog of the world
The oldest dog of the world
A fossil found more than 100 years ago in a cave in Switzerland may belong to the oldest domestic dog in the world.

Physics - Earth Sciences - 17.12.2009
Astronomers find world with inhospitable atmosphere
Astronomers find world with inhospitable atmosphere
Astronomers have discovered the second super-Earth exoplanet for which they have determined the mass and radius, giving vital clues about its structure.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 09.05.2008
It's in the water
What if hydrology is more important for predicting biodiversity than biology?bAn international team involving EPFL scientists has published research in the May 8th issue of the journal Nature that ch