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Health - Life Sciences - 18.03.2020
Loss of Protein Disturbs Intestinal Homeostasis and Can Drive Cancer
Loss of Protein Disturbs Intestinal Homeostasis and Can Drive Cancer
An international team of researchers from the University of Zurich, the University Hospital Zurich, Heidelberg and Glasgow has identified a novel function for the cell death regulating protein MCL1: It is essential in protecting the intestine against cancer development - independent of bacterial-driven inflammation.

Health - 17.03.2020
New mechanisms of regulation of our immune system
New mechanisms of regulation of our immune system
A group of researchers from the Institute for Research in Biomedicine in Bellinzona (IRB, affiliated to USI) and the European Institute of Oncology (IEO) in Milan have identified a molecular mechanism that maintains the regulation of the response of our immune system avoiding excessive responses that can damage the body.

Health - Environment - 16.03.2020
Better Understanding of Air Pollution and Health in Europe
Better Understanding of Air Pollution and Health in Europe
To date, air pollution represents the largest environmental risk to health. According to the World Health Organization, air pollution is responsible for about one in every nine deaths annually. A new study by Swiss TPH used robust modelling methodology to estimate nitrogen dioxide levels in Europe through the combination of monitors, satellites and chemical transport models.

Life Sciences - Health - 16.03.2020
The importance of gene position for muscle development and integrity
The importance of gene position for muscle development and integrity
Mutations in the nuclear structural protein lamin A produce rare, tissue-specific diseases called laminopathies. To study these diseases, researchers from the Gasser group introduced a mutation inducing a human laminopathy in C. elegans and monitored its effect on chromatin. Not only did they understand the molecular basis of the disease, they found a way to counteract the dominant defects of the mutation, suggesting a novel therapeutic pathway.

Health - Environment - 13.03.2020
Reducing the risk of infection
Reducing the risk of infection
Biology shows us that there are additional ways to reduce the risk of serious coronavirus infections, in addition to hand hygiene and keeping distance, Viola Vogel writes. We all know the importance of good hand hygiene and of keeping our distance if we want to protect ourselves and others from infection with the novel coronavirus.

Health - Life Sciences - 12.03.2020
Gold nanoparticles uncover amyloid fibrils
EPFL scientists have developed powerful tools to unmask the diversity of amyloid fibrils, which are associated with Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. The scientists made the breakthrough by developing gold nanoparticles that combine with cryogenic transmission electron microscopy, to provide rapid and unprecedented images of fibrils.

Health - Pharmacology - 09.03.2020
Circulatory failure is predictable
Circulatory failure is predictable
Researchers at ETH Zurich and Bern University Hospital have developed a method for predicting circulatory failure in patients in intensive care units - enabling clinicians to intervene at an early stage. Their approach uses machine learning methods to evaluate an extensive body of patient data. Patients in a hospital's intensive care unit are kept under close observation: clinicians continuously monitor their vital signs such as their pulse, blood pressure and blood oxygen saturation.

Life Sciences - Health - 28.02.2020
Calculating the beginnings of the coronavirus epidemic
Calculating the beginnings of the coronavirus epidemic
Analyses of publicly available genome data provide clues to the beginnings of the coronavirus epidemic in China. Researchers from the Department of Biosystems Science and Engineering at ETH Zurich in Basel used a statistical model they had developed in recent years. Since the current coronavirus epidemic started, scientists and authorities have determined the genetic fingerprint of virus samples from numerous affected countries.

Physics - Health - 26.02.2020
Glass slides that stand to revolutionize fluorescence microscopy
Glass slides that stand to revolutionize fluorescence microscopy
EPFL scientists have developed a new type of microscope slide that can boost the amount of light in fluorescence microscopy by a factor of up to 25. These new slides can both amplify and direct light, making them ideal for applications ranging from early-stage diagnosis to the rapid archiving of pathology samples.

Health - Chemistry - 26.02.2020
Better care: fast, sensitive blood tests for use at home
Better care: fast, sensitive blood tests for use at home
They should be fast, portable and easy to use: blood tests that can be done at home. Having already come up with a prototype, ETH Pioneer Fellow Alexander Tanno is working with doctoral student Yves Blickenstorfer to bring the idea to market. The prototype that Alexander Tanno is holding between his thumb and forefinger doesn't look particularly impressive.

Health - Pharmacology - 21.02.2020
A better diagnosis of rare diabetes to adapt treatment
A better diagnosis of rare diabetes to adapt treatment
Scientists highlight the importance of monogenic diabetes and the consequences in terms of care of a precise diagnosis. Diabetes affects more than 400 million people worldwide and is a major public health problem. Although commonly referred to as a single disease, it actually constitutes a group of metabolic disorders with hyperglycaemia as a common feature.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.02.2020
A scaffold at the center of our cellular skeleton
A scaffold at the center of our cellular skeleton
UNIGE researchers have discovered a new nano-structure that lies at the center of our cellular skeleton. This discovery will allow to better understand how the cell maintains its architecture as well as the pathologies associated with dysfunctions of this structure. All animal cells have an organelle called a centrosome, which is essential to the organization of their cell skeleton.

Health - Pharmacology - 20.02.2020
Decision time predicts the risk of depression relapse
Decision time predicts the risk of depression relapse
In a study, researchers have shown that it is possible to predict the risk of relapsing into depression after stopping antidepressant medication. People who relapse take longer to decide how much effort to invest for a reward. Depressive disorder is a major public health problem with an unpredictable course.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.02.2020
New insights into the processes that cause Parkinson's disease
New insights into the processes that cause Parkinson's disease
In a breakthrough for Parkinson's disease, scientists at EPFL have reconstructing the process by which Lewy bodies form in the brain of patients. The study offers new insights into how Parkinson's disease begins and evolves, and opens up a set of potential new treatment targets. The brains of patients with Parkinson's disease contain distinct, characteristic structures called 'Lewy bodies', after Friedrich Heinrich Lewy who first reported their discovery in 1912.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.02.2020
From obesity to liver cancer: can we prevent the worst?
From obesity to liver cancer: can we prevent the worst?
By identifying the role of a specific protein in the development of obesity-related liver diseases, UNIGE researchers pave the way for better diagnosis, and potentially better treatment. Hepatocellular carcinoma, a very common liver cancer linked to the presence of fat in the liver, is one of the leading causes of cancer death worldwide.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.02.2020
Fruit flies have a radical strategy for dealing with free radicals
Flies belonging to the genus Drosophila combat oxidative stress by removing excess fat from their blood. This remarkable mechanism proves that evolution has no shortage of answers to a problem that affects all life on Earth. Oxidative stress affects all living organisms, and the damage it causes is believed to play a part in cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer's disease and a number of other health conditions.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.02.2020
Printing tiny, high-precision objects in a matter of seconds
Researchers at EPFL have developed a new, high-precision method for 3D-printing small, soft objects. The process, which takes less than 30 seconds from start to finish, has potential applications in a wide range of fields, including 3D bioprinting. It all starts with a translucent liquid. Then, as if by magic, darker spots begin to form in the small, spinning container until, barely half a minute later, the finished product takes shape.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.02.2020
Algorithms for identifying new
Algorithms for identifying new "cancer genes"
It is estimated that the number of cancer cases worldwide will double by 2040. This makes the search for genes that cause cancer even more important. A team of researchers from the University of Bern and Inselspital, University Hospital Bern, has now developed algorithms that massively simplify the hunt for "cancer genes" in a poorly understood part of our genome.

Health - Physics - 11.02.2020
Bacteria under the microscope: a new growth model for tuberculosis
Bacteria under the microscope: a new growth model for tuberculosis
New research has shed light on how mycobacteria grow. This discovery could explain why some members of this family of single-celled organisms, which includes the bacillus that causes tuberculosis, can develop resistance to antibiotics For centuries, scientists have peered down the lens of a microscope and watched as bacteria - some circular, others rod-shaped - multiply before their eyes.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.02.2020
Connecting two important processes in gene expression
Connecting two important processes in gene expression
RNA decay plays a fundamental role in gene expression by controlling the quality and quantity of messenger RNAs. However, it has proved difficult to study and is still shrouded in mystery. Scientists from the Bühler group now uncovered key targets, components and functions of mammalian RNA decay pathways, and found that RNA decay is tightly connected to another crucial stage of gene expression: protein synthesis (translation).