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Life Sciences - Health - 31.08.2012
Genetic observation reveals a bone-weakening mechanism
Genetic observation reveals a bone-weakening mechanism
A research team has used a novel method to identify a gene involved in bone building. "Real life genetics" works. This research method involves observing physiological traits or metabolic disease in a large population of "wild-type" mice (those which have not been genetically modified), and then isolating the genes that could be responsible.

Health - Life Sciences - 05.07.2012
Demystifying the immortality of cancer cells
Demystifying the immortality of cancer cells
In cancer cells, normal mechanisms governing the cellular life cycle have gone haywire. Cancer cells continue to divide indefinitely, without ever dying off, thus creating rapidly growing tumors.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.05.2012
Light is good for our brains
Light is good for our brains
Scientists have proven that light intensity influences our cognitive performance and how alert we feel, and that these positive effects last until early evening. Tests conducted at EPFL have confirmed the hypothesis that light influences our subjective feeling of sleepiness. The research team, led by Mirjam Münch, also showed that the effects of light exposure last until the early evening, and that light intensity has an impact on cognitive mechanisms.

Health - Microtechnics - 04.05.2012
A Robot for Spinal Column Operations
A Robot for Spinal Column Operations
With less than a 0.5 mm margin of error, Neuroglide, the robot developed by researchers allows for the placement of screws in small vertebrae with unequaled precision.

Health - Economics / Business - 01.05.2012
Actelion ensures his future with Macitentan
Actelion ensures his future with Macitentan
Actelion announced today that initial analysis indicates that the pivotal, long-term, event-driven study SERAPHIN with macitentan, a novel dual endothelin receptor antagonist, in 742 patients sufferi

Agronomy / Food Science - Health - 26.03.2012
Analyzing food quality with an artificial intestine
Analyzing food quality with an artificial intestine
Researchers have developed a miniature on-chip gastrointestinal tract in order to observe the effects of various nutrients on health. The “NutriChip? project's in vitro tests have already begun, on dairy products. What happens in our bodies when we have eaten something? Are “healthy? food products actually good for us, once they have been digested and absorbed? Supported by Nano-Tera and Nestlé, the NutriChip project developed by Martin Gijs's team at the Laboratory of Microsystems at EPFL provides new insights to these questions.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.03.2012
Understanding the propagation of Alzheimer's Disease
Understanding the propagation of Alzheimer’s Disease
The connections between neurons might play a role in neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's Disease (AD). In a pioneering approach to studying how neurodegenerative diseases like AD spread within the brain, researchers have developed a novel in vitro experimental method that allows them to connect healthy neurons with “infected? neurons and then observe the results.

Life Sciences - Health - 09.03.2012
Chemical Biology of Parkinson's disease
Chemical Biology of Parkinson’s disease
Elucidating the role of C-terminal post-translational modifications using protein semisynthesis strategies: α-synuclein phosphorylation at tyrosine 125.

Health - 05.03.2012
New point of attack for breast cancer
New point of attack for breast cancer
Scientists describe how the protein phosphatase SHP2 promotes breast cancer with poor prognosis. SHP2 is necessary for the maintenance of the few tumor initiating cells (TICs) in a breast tumor.

Health - Materials Science - 30.01.2012
Protective covering for implants
Protective covering for implants
A new technology could prevent most breast implant rejections. So far, more than a quarter of all breast implants must be removed within four years, because neighboring tissues develop a rigid envelope of fibrous tissue to protect themselves from the foreign body. A company has developed a protective covering made up of a nanostructured surface and a layer of collagen that will prevent the body from rejecting the implant.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.12.2011
Starving cancer
Starving cancer
A research group has developed a new strategy to fight cancer. Blood vessels in the environment of tumours are killed with a new molecule which leads to the ?starvation? of the tumour. Compared to currently applied treatments, this new strategy has a series of advantages. Modern cancer therapeutics produced by biotechnological methods, often are based on antibodies.

Health - Life Sciences - 24.11.2011
Repairing UV damage in the skin
Repairing UV damage in the skin
Scientists have elucidated the mechanisms underlying the repair of UV-induced damage in DNA, which frequently causes skin cancer. The protein structures additionally determined by these researchers will improve our understanding of how the body protects itself against skin cancer. These studies lay the foundations for the development of a new class of anti cancer agents.

Pharmacology - Health - 17.11.2011
New dual-acting class of antimalarial compounds
New dual-acting class of antimalarial compounds
Researchers from Novartis have reported new dual-acting class of antimalarial compounds with potential to both prevent and treat malaria infections. A new class of antimalarial drug candidates inhibits malaria parasite liver-and blood-stages in malaria models. Most current malaria treatments target blood infections but researchers believe both liver and blood infections need to be treated to eliminate malaria.

Health - Pharmacology - 11.11.2011
New therapeutic avenues for obesity
New therapeutic avenues for obesity
Newly discovered mechanisms lay the foundation for a new therapeutic avenues that one day may be beneficial in treating diseases, ranging from muscle weakness and frailty to obesity and diabetes. Researchers from EPFL published a study which highlight on the roles of a nuclear receptor co-repressor, NCoR1.

Health - 14.09.2011
Camera reveals blood circulation
Camera reveals blood circulation
A device shows how blood is circulating in the skin. It already facilitates the work of burn specialists and plastic and reconstructive surgeons.

Health - Chemistry - 01.09.2011
Profiler at the cellular level
Researchers have successfully incorporated a diagnostic biological "computer" network in human cells. This network recognizes certain cancer cells using logic combinations of five cancer-specific molecular factors, triggering cancer cells destruction. Yaakov (Kobi) Benenson, from ETH Zurich, has spent a large part of his career developing biological computers that operate in living cells.

Health - Life Sciences - 30.08.2011
Combating fungal diseases
Combating fungal diseases
Scientists have discovered a potential new approach for inhibiting the growth of pathogenic fungi. Ultimately, immunocompromised patients with fungal infections, in particular, could benefit from this work. As temperatures soar and more and more people cool off at outdoor pools, the incidence of so called swimmer's ear - an infection of the ear canal - also rises.

Health - Physics - 02.08.2011
New method for the diagnosis of cancer
New method for the diagnosis of cancer
Researchers have developed a new breast cancer diagnostic method, and is now carrying out first tests on non-preserved human tissue. This new method should be able to reveal structures that cannot be seen using conventional mammography. Standard procedures only determine the extent to which X-rays are attenuated by various tissue structures.

Health - 06.06.2011
Remote diagnosis for medical ultrasound
Remote diagnosis for medical ultrasound
An ultrasound machine has been transformed into a telediagnosis tool. Specialists in other hospitals can see images in real time, pinpoint the exact zone they're coming from, and interact. Making a diagnosis using ultrasound images often requires advice from experts in other hospitals, particularly in neurology.

Health - Life Sciences - 21.04.2011
HIV: alerts sent by a protein
HIV: alerts sent by a protein
Scientists now understand how the TRIM5 protein works and particularly how it temporarily blocks spread of the retrovirus in humans.
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