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Health - Life Sciences - 23.06.2022
With a hydrogel against black skin cancer
With a hydrogel against black skin cancer
Researchers at the University of Bern have developed a therapy option that activates the body's own defense system against black skin cancer. Components of a bacterium are embedded in gel and applied directly to the area of the tumor. In the model, the gel was shown to reduce tumor growth, inhibit its spread to other organs and thereby prolong survival.

Life Sciences - Environment - 22.06.2022
Tapping the ocean as a source of natural products
Tapping the ocean as a source of natural products
Using DNA data, researchers from ETH and Eawag have examined seawater to find not only new species of bacteria, but also previously unknown natural products that may one day prove beneficial as they report today. The oceans are teeming with countless forms of life, from the world's largest creature - the blue whale - to miniscule microorganisms.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.06.2022
Neutralizing antibodies control bacterial infection
Neutralizing antibodies control bacterial infection
University of Basel researchers have discovered neutralizing antibodies which prevent bacterial infection or bring them to a halt. Only changes in the antibody docking sites on the bacterial cell surface enables the pathogen to evade this effective immune defense. Bartonella are bacteria that are transmitted from blood-sucking insects to mammals, including humans.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.06.2022
A new hope for a therapy against retinitis pigmentosa
A new hope for a therapy against retinitis pigmentosa
A team led by the UNIGE has identified a molecular mechanism that causes degeneration of the eye's photoreceptors, which can lead to blindness. Retinitis pigmentosa , a degenerative genetic disease of the eye, is characterized by progressive vision loss, usually leading to blindness. In some patients, structural defects in the photoreceptor cells have been observed, but the molecular mechanisms involved are not understood.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.06.2022
Streamlining stem cells to treat macular degeneration
Streamlining stem cells to treat macular degeneration
Scientists at EPFL and the Karolinska Institute have tested and confirmed a protocol for growing human embryonic stem cells into retina cells to treat eye diseases such as age-related macular degeneration. As we age, so do our eyes; most commonly, this involves changes to our vision and new glasses, but there are more severe forms of age-related eye problems.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 13.06.2022
An anti-cancer drug acts as an epigenetic memory aid, scientists find
An anti-cancer drug acts as an epigenetic memory aid, scientists find
Scientists have discovered how an anti-cancer drug could be repurposed to improve memory. It does so by supporting the cell's ability to read the very genes that are important for learning. The epigenetic mechanism of the drug is shown in mice. If you are scared of spiders, you may soon benefit from a drug to enhance your ability to unlearn your arachnophobia, without any undesirable side-effects.

Health - Life Sciences - 09.06.2022
Good bacteria to tackle depression
Good bacteria to tackle depression
Intestinal flora plays an important role in health - including mental health. Researchers from the University of Basel and the University Psychiatric Clinics Basel (UPK) have shown that probiotics can support the effect of antidepressants and help to alleviate depression. When he was visited by what he called "the black dog", Winston Churchill could barely get out of bed.

Environment - Life Sciences - 09.06.2022
Scientists compile an inventory of endangered microorganisms
Scientists compile an inventory of endangered microorganisms
Cryospheric ecosystems are some of the oldest on the planet. scientists have found that the microorganisms living in them have a unique genetic signature. They performed an inventory of the microorganisms in these ecosystems and complied the information into a database, which will be a useful resource for future studies on climate change microbiology.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.06.2022
Meteorite impact in the brain
Meteorite impact in the brain
A blood clot in the brain that blocks the supply of oxygen can cause an acute stroke. In this case, every minute counts. A team from Empa, the University Hospital in Geneva and the Hirslanden Clinic is currently developing a diagnostic procedure that can be used to start a tailored therapy in a timely manner, as they write in the current issue of the scientific journal Scientific Reports.

Life Sciences - Health - 07.06.2022
How animals reach their correct size
How animals reach their correct size
Adults of the same species usually differ very little in their size. A team from the University of Bern and the Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research (FMI) in Basel has now discovered a mechanism that ensures such size uniformity. The research using nematodes showed that the speed of growth determines the speed of a genetic clock that times development.

Environment - Life Sciences - 30.05.2022
Unselfish behavior has evolutionary reasons
Unselfish behavior has evolutionary reasons
Altruistic behavior is often seen as an exclusively human characteristic. However, behavioral research has uncovered numerous examples of altruistic behavior in the animal kingdom. In a new study, researchers at the University of Bern show that animals that help others -selflessly- to raise their young generate an evolutionary advantage.

Life Sciences - 26.05.2022
Olfactory neurons adapt to the surrounding environment
Olfactory neurons adapt to the surrounding environment
A team from the UNIGE has highlighted the great variability and continuous adaptation of olfactory neurons. Olfactory receptors, present on the surface of sensory neurons in the nasal cavity, recognize odorant molecules and relay this information to the brain. How do these neurons manage to detect a large variability of signals and adapt to different levels of stimulation? A joint team from the Faculty of Science and the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Geneva investigated the gene expression profile of these neurons in the presence or absence of odorant stimulation.

Health - Life Sciences - 24.05.2022
Cystic fibrosis: restoring airway integrity
Cystic fibrosis: restoring airway integrity
A team from the University of Geneva reveals that hydrating the surface of the airways of people with cystic fibrosis restores their protective barrier against unwanted bacteria. Cystic fibrosis is a rare genetic disease which can cause very serious symptoms. In particular, patients suffer from chronic bacterial infections that can lead to respiratory failure.

Computer Science - Life Sciences - 18.05.2022
A component for brain-inspired computing
A component for brain-inspired computing
Researchers from ETH Zurich, Empa and the University of Zurich have developed a new material for an electronic component that can be used in a wider range of applications than its predecessors. Such components will help create electronic circuits that emulate the human brain and that are more efficient than conventional computers at performing machine-learning tasks.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.05.2022
Change of temperature causes whole body reprogramming
Scientists have discovered that changes in temperature cause marked and organ-specific effects in all tissues. Human beings, like most organisms, are constantly exposed to alternating colder or warmer temperatures. These environmental variations cause striking metabolic effects and require constant adaptations.

Life Sciences - Computer Science - 16.05.2022
NeuroMechFly: a digital twin of Drosophila
NeuroMechFly: a digital twin of Drosophila
Scientists have developed a digital model of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, which realistically simulates the movements of the animal. The twin is a big step towards reverse engineering the neuromechanical control of animal behavior, and developing bioinspired robots. "We used two kinds of data to build NeuroMechFly," says Professor Pavan Ramdya at EPFL's School of Life Sciences.

Life Sciences - Mathematics - 13.05.2022
How cells correct errors under time pressure
How cells correct errors under time pressure
How does a cell balance risk and speed when dividing? scientists have developed and experimentally tested the first mathematical theory that describes the cell's best strategy for dividing safely and efficiently. Cells go through a life cycle that includes growing to the right size, being equipped to perform its functions, and finally dividing into two new cells.

Life Sciences - 13.05.2022
Our cells take their ease in the curves
A team from the University of Geneva shows that cells that make up our tissues increase in volume when tissues bend. A key discovery for the culture of in vitro organs. "Sheet" of curved cells in the form of a tube: the cells initially organized flat were forced to curl. (c) Aurélien Roux How do our cells organize themselves to give their final shape to our organs? The answer lies in morphogenesis, the set of mechanisms that regulate their distribution in space during embryonic development.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.05.2022
When unconscious, the brain is anything but 'silent'
When unconscious, the brain is anything but ’silent’
The cerebral cortex is thought to be the seat of conscious processing in the brain. Rather than being inactivated, specific cells in the cortex show higher spontaneous activity during general anesthesia than when awake, and this activity is synchronized across those cortical cells. Improving our understanding of the neuronal mechanisms of general anesthesia could lead to better anesthetic drugs and improved surgical outcomes.

Life Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 12.05.2022
The genetic origins of the world's first farmers clarified
The genetic origins of the world’s first farmers clarified
The genetic origins of the first agriculturalists in the Neolithic period long seemed to lie in the Near East. A new study published in the journal Cell shows that the first farmers actually represented a mixture of Ice Age hunter-gatherer groups, spread from the Near East all the way to south-eastern Europe.
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