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Results 1 - 20 of 1022.
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Life Sciences - Health - 25.01.2022
Alzheimer's disease: an alternative hypothesis based on synaptic alterations
Alzheimer’s disease: an alternative hypothesis based on synaptic alterations
New research suggests that targeting proteins essential to neurotransmission could be a promising alternative to treat Alzheimer's disease New research published today in Alzheimer's & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association could explain why neurons fail to communicate effectively in people with Alzheimer's disease (AD).

Health - Life Sciences - 20.01.2022
What lies beneath COVID-19 inflammation
What lies beneath COVID-19 inflammation
Scientists at EPFL and the University Hospital of Lausanne (CHUV) have found the biological mechanism behind the inflammation seen in COVID-19 infections that involve a rise in interferons in the lungs and skin. As the COVID-19 pandemic rages on, scientists across the world are looking at the pathology of the SARS-CoV-2 virus in an effort to find effective treatments for patients.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.01.2022
Neutral mutants can prevail in gut microbiota, enhancing diversity
Scientists at EPFL and Sorbonne propose a new model of the diversity and evolution of gut bacteria that shows how the gut environment helps neutral mutations become prevalent, with significant potential implications on health and metabolic diseases. -We are used to thinking of evolution as a very slow process, and this is definitely the case for large mammals etc,- says Professor Anne-Florence Bitbol at EPFL's School of Life Sciences.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 12.01.2022
Shape guides the growth of organoids
Shape guides the growth of organoids
Organoids are miniature lab-grown tissue structures that can mimic real organs. But guiding stem cells to grow an organoid of defined shape and size is difficult. Now, EPFL bioengineers have developed new methods for successfully guiding the stem cells to grow into intestinal tissues with real-life 3D structure and function.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.01.2022
Decoding inner language to treat speech disorders
Decoding inner language to treat speech disorders
A research team from the UNIGE and the HUG has succeeded in identifying certain signals produced by our brain when we speak to ourselves. What if it were possible to decode the internal language of individuals deprived of the ability to express themselves? This is the objective of a team of neuroscientists from the University of Geneva and the University Hospitals of Geneva (HUG).

Health - Life Sciences - 10.01.2022
Novel method to track precisely prostate cancer progression
In the fight against tumours, how the key driver mutations related to disease progression and metastatic spread regulate gene expression to promote ultimately tumor progression and cancer cell adaptation to therapies have remained largely elusive. Using the gene expression fingerprint of cancer cells, researchers at the Istitute of Oncology Research (IOR, affiliated to USI Università della Svizzera italiana) in Bellinzona have now developed a novel method to track precisely prostate cancer progression in an unprecedented manner.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 10.01.2022
Improved motor, sensory, and cognitive recovery after stroke
Improved motor, sensory, and cognitive recovery after stroke
Stroke survivors have improved recovery of hand and arm function with the help a new rehabilitation protocol thanks to finely tuned electrostimulation of target muscles in the arm. After lying for a while in a way that puts pressure on a nerve in your arm, it may happen that you no longer feel your arm anymore.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 07.01.2022
The neuronal mechanism behind motivation
The neuronal mechanism behind motivation
Our actions are motivated by the goals we want to achieve. However, little is known about the mechanism in our brains that allow us to make the right decisions to reach our goals. Researchers at the Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research (FMI) and the University of Basel now identified the sequence of events taking place in a mouse brain when the mouse behaves in a certain way to obtain a reward.

Life Sciences - Physics - 03.01.2022
More insight into how vision works
More insight into how vision works
PSI scientists have shed light on an important component of the eye: a protein in the rod cells of the retina which helps us see in dim light. Acting as an ion channel in the cell membrane, the protein is responsible for relaying the optical signal from the eye to the brain. If a genetic disorder disrupts the molecular function in a person, they will go blind.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 29.12.2021
Omicron's secrets revealed under a microscope
Omicron’s secrets revealed under a microscope
Thanks to the high-power electron microscopes at the Dubochet Center for Imaging (DCI), scientists were able to observe the configuration of the Omicron variant's spike protein at a near-atomic scale. This should provide fresh insight into the mechanisms the variant uses to evade vaccines and antibodies.

Life Sciences - Physics - 22.12.2021
How do our organs know when to stop growing?
How do our organs know when to stop growing?
A multidisciplinary team led by researchers from the University of Geneva and MPIPKS has solved with a mathematical equation the mystery of how an organ changes its size depending on the size of the animal. The smallest fish in the world, the Paedocypris, measures only 7 millimeters. This is nothing compared to the 9 meters of the whale shark.

Life Sciences - Campus - 22.12.2021
Academic Education Can Positively Affect Aging of the Brain
Academic Education Can Positively Affect Aging of the Brain
The benefits of good education and lifelong learning extend into old age. The initial findings of a long-term study show that certain degenerative processes are reduced in the brains of academics. Their brains are better able to compensate age-related cognitive and neural limitations. A good education is an excellent way to embark on a successful career and develop your personality.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.12.2021
T cells: No time to die
T cells: No time to die
They are at the forefront in the fight against viruses, bacteria, and malignant cells: the T cells of our immune system. But the older we get, the fewer of them our body produces. Thus, how long we remain healthy also depends on how long the T cells survive. Researchers at the University of Basel have now uncovered a previously unknown signaling pathway essential for T cell viability.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.12.2021
Mechanism for DNA invasion of Adenoviral Covid-19 Vaccines Discovered
Mechanism for DNA invasion of Adenoviral Covid-19 Vaccines Discovered
Adenoviruses have a linchpin protein that stabilizes their DNA until it reaches the infected cell's nucleus. The protein then detaches from the viral genome, and the virus uncoats. Only then are the genes released into the nucleus, which is necessary for the production of new viruses. This process, discovered by researchers at the University of Zurich, is a key for effective functioning of various Covid-19 vaccines.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.12.2021
New muscle layer discovered on the jaw
New muscle layer discovered on the jaw
Human anatomy still has a few surprises in store for us: researchers at the University of Basel have discovered a previously overlooked section of our jaw muscles and described this layer in detail for the first time. The masseter muscle is the most prominent of the jaw muscles. If you place your fingers on the back of your cheeks and press your teeth together, you'll feel the muscle tighten.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.12.2021
An enemy within: Pathogens hide in tissue
An enemy within: Pathogens hide in tissue
Antibiotics cure many bacterial infections. However, some patients suffer a relapse. A research group at the University of Basel has now discovered why some bacteria can survive antibiotic therapy. The team uncovered where the bacteria hide in the body and how the body's own immune system also plays an important role.

Life Sciences - 14.12.2021
When the brain switches from hearing to listening
What happens in the brain when simply hearing becomes listening? To answer this question, researchers at the University of Basel have traced the neuronal fingerprint of the two types of sound processing in the mouse brain. It is intuitively clear to us that there is a difference between passive hearing and active listening.

Life Sciences - 13.12.2021
A missing genetic switch at the origin of malformations
A missing genetic switch at the origin of malformations
UNIGE Scientists have discovered how the absence of a genetic switch can lead to malformations during embryonic development. Embryonic development follows delicate stages: for everything to go well, many genes must coordinate their activity according to a very meticulous scheme and tempo. This precision mechanism sometimes fails, leading to more or less disabling malformations.

Life Sciences - 10.12.2021
Mechanical forces shape the 'immortal' Hydra
Mechanical forces shape the ’immortal’ Hydra
Hydras are tiny creatures with regenerative superpowers: they can renew their stem cells and replace damaged body parts in only a few days. Now, researchers in the Tsiairis group have found that mechanical forces turn on key genes as the mighty Hydras regenerate their entire bodies from scraps of tissue.

Life Sciences - 07.12.2021
How sound changes sight
How sound changes sight
When we learn to associate an auditory stimulus with a visual stimulus, the perception of that visual stimulus changes, but this phenomenon is not well understood. For the first time, the Keller group has now identified a mechanism in the brain that enables auditory information to influence visual representations.
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