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Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
26.04.2017
Novel Antibiotic Resistance gene in Milk
Novel Antibiotic Resistance gene in Milk
Media releases, information for representatives of the media Media Relations (E) Researchers of the University of Bern have identified a new antibiotic resistance gene in bacteria from dairy cows. This gene confers resistance to all beta-lactam antibiotics including the last generation of cephalosporins used against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.
Life Sciences
25.04.2017
A novel form of iron for fortification of foods
A novel form of iron for fortification of foods
Whey protein nanofibrils loaded with iron nanoparticles: ETH researchers are developing a new and highly effective way of fortifying iron into food and drinks.
Life Sciences
20.04.2017
Cameras can reveal images that are hidden to the naked eye
Cameras can reveal images that are hidden to the naked eye
EPFL researchers took advantage of the limits of human vision to hide an image in a video. The image is invisible to the human eye, but not to a camera. Human visual perception works well and is very effective at seeing what's important to us. But our eyes are not capable of analyzing video images that last longer than 40 milliseconds.
Life Sciences
10.04.2017
Brain stimulation influences honest behavior
Brain stimulation influences honest behavior
Honesty plays a key role in social and economic life. Without honesty, promises are not kept, contracts are not enforced, taxes remain unpaid. Despite the importance of honesty for society, its biological basis remains poorly understood. Researchers at the University of Zurich, together with colleagues from Chicago and Boston, now show that honest behavior can be increased by means of non-invasive brain stimulation.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
04.04.2017
Using drugs to weaken traumatic memories
Physical violence, war or a natural disaster can trigger posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Those affected keep reliving the traumatic event – through memories that hit them out of the blue or as recurring nightmares. As this psychological wound can't always be treated successfully with psychotherapy, scientists have long been looking for a way to influence trauma memory using drugs.
Life Sciences - Sport Sciences
03.04.2017
Area of the brain affected by autism detected
Area of the brain affected by autism detected
Brain researchers at ETH Zurich and other universities have shown for the first time that a region of the brain associated with empathy only activates very weakly in autistic people. This knowledge could help to develop new therapies for those affected by autism. Professor Nicole Wenderoth and her senior scientist Joshua Balsters, both researchers at ETH, have used functional MRI images (fMRI) from autistic adolescents to discover unusual activity in a particular region of the brain, the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC).
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
30.03.2017
Anti-cancer drug gets a boost when combined with antirheumatic
Anti-cancer drug gets a boost when combined with antirheumatic
Scientists at EPFL and NTU have discovered that combining an anticancer drug with an antirheumatic produces improved effects against tumors. The discovery opens a new path for drug-drug synergy. One of the goals in pharmacology is to increase the efficiency of drugs by minimizing their side effects.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
28.03.2017
Inflammation awakens sleepers
Inflammation awakens sleepers
The inflammatory response that is supposed to ward off pathogens that cause intestinal disease makes this even worse.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
28.03.2017
Cracking the code of Huntington's disease
Cracking the code of Huntington's disease
Huntington's disease is caused by a gene mutation that causes a protein to build up in the brain. In a world first, EPFL scientists have synthesized and studied modified forms of a mutant part of the protein, deepening our understanding of how it contributes to the disease, and pointing to new therapeutic strategies for treating it.
Life Sciences - Mathematics
23.03.2017
Fighting malaria through metabolism
Fighting malaria through metabolism
EPFL scientists have fully modeled the metabolism of the deadliest malaria parasite. The model offers unprecedented tools for developing a new generation of antimalarial therapies to overcome drug resistance. Image: Computational analysis of the malaria parasites' metabolism aids in the understanding of observed phenotypes.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
21.03.2017
Testing the Efficacy of New Gene Therapies More Efficiently
Testing the Efficacy of New Gene Therapies More Efficiently
Chronic Granulomatous Disease is a hereditary disease of the immune system. Due to a gene defect, phagocytes of affected patients are unable to kill ingested bacteria and fungi.
Life Sciences - Environment/Sustainable Development
14.03.2017
Flies and bees act like plant cultivators
Flies and bees act like plant cultivators
Not much plant sex happens without pollinator insects: Bees, flies or butterflies transfer the male pollen grains to the stigma of a plant's female style, thereby ensuring its sexual reproduction.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
08.03.2017
The proteins that domesticated our genomes
The proteins that domesticated our genomes
EPFL scientists have carried out a genomic and evolutionary study of a large and enigmatic family of human proteins, to demonstrate that it is responsible for harnessing the millions of transposable elements in the human genome. The work reveals the largely species-specific gene-regulatory networks that impact all of human biology, in both health and disease.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
08.03.2017
How stable manure protects against allergies
How stable manure protects against allergies
Researchers funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF) studied laboratory mice growing up in a cowshed. This enabled them to investigate how the farm environment modifies the immune system and provides protection against allergies. Improved hygiene has largely eliminated infectious diseases from everyday life.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
02.03.2017
Genome Editing: Pressing the «Delete» Button on DNA
Genome Editing: Pressing the «Delete» Button on DNA
Until recently, genomics was a «read-only» science. But scientists led by Rory Johnson at the University of Bern and the Centre for Genomic Regulation in Barcelona, have now developed a tool for quick and easy deletion of DNA in living cells. This software will boost efforts to understand the vast regions of non-coding DNA, or «Dark Matter», in our DNA and may lead to discovery of new disease-causing genes and potential new drugs.
Life Sciences - Chemistry
01.03.2017
Molecular structure of the cell nucleoskeleton revealed for the first time
Molecular structure of the cell nucleoskeleton revealed for the first time
Compared to bacteria, in eukaryotes the genetic material is located in the cell nucleus. Its outer shell consists of the nuclear membrane with numerous nuclear pores. Molecules are transported into or out of the cell nucleus via these pores. Beneath the membrane lies the nuclear lamina, a threadlike meshwork merely a few millionths of a millimeter thick.
Astronomy - Life Sciences
28.02.2017
Cells adapt ultra-rapidly to zero gravity
Cells adapt ultra-rapidly to zero gravity
Mammalian cells are optimally adapted to gravity. But what happens in the microgravity environment of space if the earth‘s pull disappears' Previously, many experiments exhibited cell changes – after hours or even days in zero gravity. Astronauts, however, returned to Earth without any severe health problems after long missions in space, which begs the question as to how capable cells are of adapting to changes in gravity.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
23.02.2017
Rare proteins collapse earlier
Rare proteins collapse earlier
Some organisms are able to survive in hot springs, while others can only live at mild temperatures because their proteins aren't able to withstand such extreme heat. ETH researchers investigated these differences and showed that often only a few key proteins determine the life and heat-induced death of a cell.
Life Sciences - Architecture
21.02.2017
New computer model shows how proteins are controlled
New computer model shows how proteins are controlled "at a distance"
EPFL scientists have created a new computer model that can help better design of allosteric drugs, which control proteins ‘at a distance'. Enzymes are large proteins that are involved in virtually every biological process, facilitating a multitude of biochemical reactions in our cells. Because of this, one of the biggest efforts in drug design today aims to control enzymes without interfering with their so-called active sites - the part of the enzyme where the biochemical reaction takes place.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Life Sciences
15.02.2017
Laissez-faire is not good enough for reforestation
Laissez-faire is not good enough for reforestation
If degraded and logged areas of tropical forests are left to nature, the populations of certain endangered tree species are not able to recover. This applies in particular to trees with large fruit where the seeds are distributed by birds, as ETH scientists have shown in a rainforest in India. In order to restore tropical rainforests, it is not enough to simply set up protected areas and leave them to their own devices.
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