« BACK

Life Sciences



Results 1 - 20 of 363.
1 2 3 4 5 ... 19 Next »

Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
23.04.2018
Dicer is not rolling dice
Dicer is not rolling dice
Researchers keep discovering new functions of small RNAs. For instance, they can be used as a defense mechanism against viruses or self-replicating genome invaders. These tiny pieces of RNA are often produced by a cleavage of long precursors by so called Dicer proteins. To their surprise, researchers from the University of Bern have found that some Dicers acquired a unique and as yet unknown feature that allow them to cleave the RNA precursors in a very specific way, resulting in small RNAs that work much more efficiently.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
20.04.2018
New Novartis analyses at AAN show siponimod’s efficacy on disability and cognition in secondary progressive MS patients
Analyses of the EXPAND study showed that siponimod (BAF312) reduced the risk of disability progression largely disassociated from relapses in patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS)   In EXPAND, siponimod also had a meaningful benefit on patients' cognitive processing speed   Findings add to clinical evidence for siponimod in SPMS, an area with a high unmet need for well-tolerated and effective new therapies - Novartis toda
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
11.04.2018
Double hit on melanoma unlocks barrier to immunotherapy
Double hit on melanoma unlocks barrier to immunotherapy
Researchers at EPFL and UNIL have discovered a dangerous liaison between immune cells that limits the efficacy of immunotherapy in melanoma. But they also found a way to disrupt it. Immunotherapies are treatments that stimulate a patient's immune cells to attack the tumor. They can be very effective in melanoma - a common and aggressive form of skin tumor - but still fail in the majority of the patients.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Life Sciences
10.04.2018
When Enemies Come to Help
When Enemies Come to Help
Interactions between organisms such as plants and animals can be found everywhere in nature. Anina Knauer and Florian Schiestl, a professor at UZH's Department of Systematic and Evolutionary Botany, has taken a closer look at one such instance: the interaction between crab spiders and the buckler-mustard, a yellow flowering plant common in Europe.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
05.04.2018
Efficient genetic modification of immune cells
Efficient genetic modification of immune cells
A new method enables genes in living T-cells in mice to be modified quickly and efficiently. It makes use of plasmids, a tried-and-tested method of genetic engineering. Researchers from the Department of Biomedicine at the University of Basel and University Hospital Basel reported these findings in the Journal of Immunology.
Life Sciences - History/Archeology
04.04.2018
Inner Ear Provides Clues to Human Dispersal
Inner Ear Provides Clues to Human Dispersal
The early migration of humans out of Africa and across the world can be proven using genetic and morphological analyses. However, morphological data from the skull and skeleton often only allow limited conclusions to be drawn about the geographical dispersal pattern, especially because of the many ways in which the human skeleton adapts to local environmental conditions.
Life Sciences - Administration/Government
29.03.2018
Gene rhythm: how the circadian clock regulates 3D chromatin structure
Gene rhythm: how the circadian clock regulates 3D chromatin structure
EPFL biologists and geneticists have uncovered how the circadian clock orchestrates the 24-hour cycle of gene expression by regulating the structure of chromatin, the tightly wound DNA-protein complex of the cell. The work is published in Genes & Development. The circadian clock is an internal, biological "metronome" that dictates our 24-hour activity pattern.
Life Sciences - Innovation/Technology
26.03.2018
A smart car that can read brain signals
A smart car that can read brain signals
EPFL and Nissan researchers are able to read a driver's brain signals and send them to a smart vehicle so that it can anticipate the driver's moves and facilitate the driving process.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
22.03.2018
Attacking lymphoma at the source
Attacking lymphoma at the source
The efficacy of target specific therapies in lymphoma is limited to subgroups of patients. EPFL scientists have identified a mechanism that confers resistance against a common therapy for lymphoma.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
19.03.2018
Tiny implants for cells are functional in vivo
Tiny implants for cells are functional in vivo
For the first time, an interdisciplinary team from the University of Basel has succeeded in integrating artificial organelles into the cells of living zebrafish embryos. This innovative approach using artificial organelles as cellular implants offers new potential in treating a range of diseases, as the authors report in an article published.
Life Sciences
16.03.2018
Mice Change Their Appearance as a Result of Frequent Exposure to Humans
Mice Change Their Appearance as a Result of Frequent Exposure to Humans
Dogs, cows, sheep, horses, pigs, and birds - over the past 15,000 years, our ancestors domesticated dozens of wild animals to keep them as farm animals or pets. To make wild wolves evolve into tame dogs, the least aggressive animals, or most gentle ones, were selected for breeding. Tameness was therefore the key criterion for selection.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
08.03.2018
Why asbestos is so dangerous
Why asbestos is so dangerous
Long, pointed asbestos fibres induce chronic inflammation, which can lead to cancer. SNSF-funded researchers have found underlying mechanisms for this and hope their results will help prevent damage. The fact that asbestos causes cancer has been largely undisputed for nearly 50 years. Now, researchers supported by the Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF) have discovered why the fibres cause such damage to the body.
History/Archeology - Life Sciences
08.03.2018
StructuralNavigation_Title
StructuralNavigation_Title
Deep in a swamp in the Russian republic of Tuva, SNSF-funded archaeologist Gino Caspari has discovered an undisturbed Scythian burial mound. All the evidence suggests that this is not only the largest Scythian princely tomb in South Siberia, but also the earliest - and that it may be harbouring some outstandingly well-preserved treasures.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
08.03.2018
Inherited mutation leads to overproduction of EPO
Inherited mutation leads to overproduction of EPO
A newly-discovered hereditary mutation is responsible for an increased production of erythropoietin (EPO) in the blood. This mutation causes a messenger RNA (mRNA) that is not normally involved in the formation of proteins to be reprogrammed so that it produces EPO, thus abnormally increasing the number of red blood cells.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
08.03.2018
Recovery from Spinal Cord Injuries Can Be Predicted
Recovery from Spinal Cord Injuries Can Be Predicted
A trauma to the spinal cord, quickly leads to a progressive loss of nerve tissue. This not only affects the injured area, but over time affects also other parts of the spinal cord and even the brain. These neurodegenerative changes can be explored in detail using magnetic resonance imaging.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
08.03.2018
Canadian researchers open a new front in the fight against MS
By Ross Neitz, University of Alberta A discovery led by scientists at the University of Alberta and McGill University is providing hope of a new therapeutic target in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) patients, which could one day be used to prevent the symptoms and progression of the disease. In examining donated human brain tissues, the researchers unexpectedly found that MS brains have extremely high content of a protein named calnexin, compared to those without MS.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
06.03.2018
Our circadian clock sets the rhythm for our cells' powerhouses
Our circadian clock sets the rhythm for our cells’ powerhouses
Cellular energy metabolism also follows the rhythm of the circadian clock. A University of Basel study has now shown exactly how this works by revealing the relationship between the circadian rhythm and the mitochondrial network for the first time. Countless genetically controlled clocks tick inside different parts of our bodies, such as the liver, kidneys and heart.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
01.03.2018
A near-universal way to measure enzyme inhibition
Researchers at McGill University have invented a new technique for measuring how quickly drugs interact with their molecular targets. The discovery provides scientists with a new way to investigate the effectiveness of drug candidates that might otherwise have been overlooked. The new method centres on the principle of enzyme inhibition.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
01.03.2018
Acetylcholine Wakes Silent Neural Network by Targeting Nicotine Receptors - News - Carnegie Mellon University
Neuroscientists at Carnegie Mellon University have, for the first time, used acetylcholine to functionally rewire a dense matrix of neurons in the brain's cerebral cortex. Using optogenetics, they found that the chemical released by nerve cells to send signals to other cells, also known as a neurotransmitter, can turn on the normally silent network by binding to the same receptors targeted by nicotine.
Physics/Materials Science - Life Sciences
28.02.2018
Super-resolution microscopy in both space and time
Super-resolution microscopy in both space and time
In a breakthrough for biological imaging, EPFL scientists have developed the first microscope platform that can perform super-resolution spatial and temporal imaging, capturing unprecedented views inside living cells. The landmark paper is published. Super-resolution microscopy is a technique that can "see" beyond the diffraction of light, providing unprecedented views of cells and their interior structures and organelles.
1 2 3 4 5 ... 19 Next »