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Life Sciences
16.06.2017
Distant Brain Regions Selectively Recruit Stem Cells
Distant Brain Regions Selectively Recruit Stem Cells
Stem cells persist in the adult mammalian brain and generate new neurons throughout life.
Life Sciences
06.06.2017
In vitro testing could be improved
In vitro testing could be improved
EPFL researchers propose a new approach of performing in vitro tests on nanoparticles that could enhance a correlation to in vivo results. This involves reproducing in the lab the dynamic and fluidic variations that these particles experience in the human body. Before new nanoparticles or other nanomedicines can be injected into the human body, a whole series of tests must be conducted in the laboratory, then in living cells, and in the end on humans.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
06.06.2017
Dogs Help in Breast Carcinoma Research
Dogs Help in Breast Carcinoma Research
Cancer is one of the most frequent diseases not only in people, but in pets as well. Like people, dogs can also suffer from cancer of the mammary glands (mammary tumors). Dog mammary tumors are very similar to breast carcinoma in humans, and much more so than those of rats or mice, for example. For this reason, research on canine mammary tumors is important for human medicine as well.
Life Sciences
01.06.2017
Ultra-stable perovskite solar cell remains stable for over a year
Ultra-stable perovskite solar cell remains stable for over a year
EPFL scientists have built a low-cost and ultra-stable perovskite solar cell that has been running at 11.2% efficiency for over a year, without loss in performance.
Life Sciences
31.05.2017
Horses masticate similarly to ruminants
Horses masticate similarly to ruminants
The mastication halters indicate that horses fragment their food with the same rhythmic chewing movements as ruminants do during rumination (Image: UZH).
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
30.05.2017
Better Treatment for Kidney Cancer Thanks to New Mouse Model
Better Treatment for Kidney Cancer Thanks to New Mouse Model
Roughly 2-3 percent of all people suffering from cancer have kidney cancer. The most common form of this disease is called clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). In roughly half of all patients with this disease, the tumor develops metastases and generally cannot be cured. New Mouse Model for Investigating Kidney Cancer The research of different types of cancer and the testing of new treatments depends on accurate mouse models.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
29.05.2017
Detailed view of a molecular toxin transporter
Detailed view of a molecular toxin transporter
Transport proteins in the cells of our body protect us from particular toxins. Researchers at ETH Zurich and the University of Basel have now determined the high-resolution three-dimensional structure of a major human transport protein.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
23.05.2017
A New T-cell Population for Cancer Immunotherapy
A New T-cell Population for Cancer Immunotherapy
Scientists at the University of Basel in Switzerland have, for the first time, described a new T'cell population that can recognize and kill tumor cells.
Life Sciences - Environment/Sustainable Development
23.05.2017
‘Pregnant' Housefly Males Demonstrate the Evolution of Sex Determination
‘Pregnant’ Housefly Males Demonstrate the Evolution of Sex Determination
Sex is one of the most essential characteristics of an individual – not only for humans, but also for animals and plants.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
22.05.2017
Deep Sleep Maintains the Learning Efficiency of the Brain
Deep Sleep Maintains the Learning Efficiency of the Brain
Most people know from their own experience that just a single sleepless night can lead to difficulty in mastering mental tasks the next day. Researchers assume that deep sleep is essential for maintaining the learning efficiency of the human brain in the long term. While we are awake, we constantly receive impressions from our environment, whereby numerous connections between the nerve cells – so-called synapses – are excited and intensified at times.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Life Sciences
18.05.2017
A tool for monitoring the biodiversity of Swiss livestock
A tool for monitoring the biodiversity of Swiss livestock
EPFL researchers have created an online platform for monitoring the genetic diversity of livestock and the sustainability of animal farming in Switzerland. This project, which was developed in partnership with the Federal Office for Agriculture, could serve as a model for other countries. "With the GenMon platform, our aim was to develop a practical tool for automating the process of monitoring livestock in Switzerland," explains Solange Duruz, a PhD student in the Laboratory of Geographic Information Systems (LASIG) and lead author of the article, which appeared in the journal PLOS One .
Environment/Sustainable Development - Life Sciences
16.05.2017
Coral reefs in the Gulf of Aqaba may survive global warming
Coral reefs in the Gulf of Aqaba may survive global warming
Coral reefs in the Red Sea's Gulf of Aqaba can resist rising water temperatures. If they survive local pollution, these corals may one day be used to re-seed parts of the world where reefs are dying.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
10.05.2017
A possible way to new antibiotics
A possible way to new antibiotics
Two research teams from the University of Bern and the ETH Zurich have developed a new method to shed light onto a mostly unknown process of bacterial protein production. Their results could be used for the design of new antibiotics. Ribosomes are the factories of the cell and, as such, are responsible for the fabrication of proteins.
Life Sciences - Media
09.05.2017
Closing the Gate to Mitochondria
Closing the Gate to Mitochondria
A team of researchers have developed a new method that enables the identification of proteins imported into mitochondria. This leads to a better understanding of disease mechanisms linked to defective cellular functions. Eukaryotic cells contain thousands of proteins, which are distributed to different cellular compartments with specific functions.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
09.05.2017
With Stem Cells to New Intervertebral Discs
With Stem Cells to New Intervertebral Discs
It is the “shock absorber” between the vertebrae of the spine, cushioning every step, bend and jump: the intervertebral disc. If the fibrocartilage tissue in the spine degenerates over time, an intervertebral disc can “slip” – pinching the medulla or nerves. The consequences include intense pain or even paralysis.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
03.05.2017
Elephant Herpes: Super-Shedders Endanger Young Animals
Elephant Herpes: Super-Shedders Endanger Young Animals
Many herpesviruses infect only a few animal species. Elephants also have their own spectrum of herpesviruses, which can cause infections that end in death.
Life Sciences
01.05.2017
The gene that starts it all
The gene that starts it all
EPFL scientists have discovered the protein that kick-starts gene expression in developing embryos. The formation of a human embryo starts with the fertilization of the oocyte by the sperm cell. This yields the zygote, the primordial cell that carries one copy each of the maternal and paternal genomes.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
26.04.2017
Novel Antibiotic Resistance gene in Milk
Novel Antibiotic Resistance gene in Milk
Media releases, information for representatives of the media Media Relations (E) Researchers of the University of Bern have identified a new antibiotic resistance gene in bacteria from dairy cows. This gene confers resistance to all beta-lactam antibiotics including the last generation of cephalosporins used against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.
Life Sciences
25.04.2017
A novel form of iron for fortification of foods
A novel form of iron for fortification of foods
Whey protein nanofibrils loaded with iron nanoparticles: ETH researchers are developing a new and highly effective way of fortifying iron into food and drinks.
Life Sciences
20.04.2017
Cameras can reveal images that are hidden to the naked eye
Cameras can reveal images that are hidden to the naked eye
EPFL researchers took advantage of the limits of human vision to hide an image in a video. The image is invisible to the human eye, but not to a camera. Human visual perception works well and is very effective at seeing what's important to us. But our eyes are not capable of analyzing video images that last longer than 40 milliseconds.
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